Kroc School at the University of San Diego Director of the Center for Peace & Commerce (CPC)
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How did you get to where you are today? What is your story? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
so as as a working mom, Um, and a scientist and a professional. You always have those those people pulling on you, those those different perspectives you have. At that point, I had toddlers pulling on every part of me possible to go play with them. But I also had a career. Um, and I also was gonna be a professional woman. I wouldn't have it any other way. Um, but also, I needed to learn about business. So I decided to to enroll in an MBA program, which is a radio school of management that really focused on start ups and innovation. So really, when you're doing that, that next step in your career and then you're gonna go after an M B. A. Really find out what that MBA school really focuses on, because whatever you want to focus on next, then you can go in and get that that, um, that return that reciprocity of your next step. So at that point, I also decided to do it part time. So it was two years part time. The part time was every Friday and Saturday. All days was kind of crazy to do, like 2.5 days of full MBA, and it was very rigorous. But I was able to be a mom the rest of the time. I was able to be a mom Monday through Thursday and then go in for Friday and Saturday. And so those the kinds of decisions that we as professional women, have to make it like, how do I make everything work right? S so that was That was a really huge blessing for me for two years, getting that rigor. But during that time, my father passed away. And, um, I was I was working on start ups since ever that the thing that always came up was access to capital. Access to capital for start ups is super hard on DTI. Get an investment is incredibly difficult, especially for women and people of color, very, very hard. So I knew that dearth of of that access to capital. So when I received capital, which I never even knew in 1000 years, I would ever get that, you know, I was a shock to the entire family, you know, the wealth that we we inherited. So I said, You know what? I don't need another good cheaper. I don't even have a Gucci purse, by the way, but I don't need a purse. I don't need a car I don't need. I think I want to invest. I want to make an impact on women and on people of color. So basically, I transitioned into being an investor really overnight, and I was able to help startups received the funding that they deserve. Red se eso fast forward 10 years I'm up to about 40 companies in my portfolio Onley women only people of color, period. That is just what I do. That's not gonna change ever on dso I'm involved in a very different, um places like ad Astra Ventures, NextWave Impact fund that allow me to invest in women and people of color through spv special people. Purpose vehicles through my own investments have actually arrested in five companies even during cove it because that was just the right thing to do. Um and then also I work at the university. So that's why I'm more on this call. Is that at the University of San Diego? They were looking for a director of the Center for Peace and Commerce. So again we talked really a long time ago about how much I love undergrads and how much I loved their their view of the world being huge and attainable and so many great things. That's the them. The let's say, the the spark in any student right, that's your in tow. Learn more as a zone undergraduate or graduate student. That's what I really love about my career. And so I went back into the University of San Diego, and we have a social innovation challenge, which is called the Fowler Global Social Innovation Challenge that any undergrad aggressions across the globe can apply to through that university. So it's a really great way to stick with my important investing ceases stick with, you know, helping undergrounds and grad students Trivoli I'm launching.

What responsibilities and decisions does one handle in a job like yours? Tell us about weekly work hours, including the time spent on work travel and working from home.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
Yeah, well, Kobe changed everything. So, um, I before Kobe it I traveled a lot. So for the directors economy, I only started pretty in January. So about six months, eso usually a director position like that one you really are involved with, You know, developing a financial model sustainable model for this temper. So how do you get grants and sponsors and people who will help you grow the program? So that's one piece of it. Another piece is teaching undergrads and grad students about the business model canvas. How do we build out of pitch pitch deck had? How do you pitch? All of that is part of that curriculum based aspect of it. And the third part is a lot of relationship building, right? It's about connecting to another university. We have about 20 university that are part of our global network, and we want to grow that more and more each year. So to do that, you need to kind of be talking to universities and before covert it. But a former assistant director would go to different countries and different universities to talk to them and bring one or two the network right, and so um, you want a mute yourself? Totally. Yeah. Do you want a mute yourself or or is it just recording me? Okay. Perfect. Um, so the former assistant director really traveled everywhere. And that's what a usually a director position does. Is the relationship building a super important? So now, with Kobe, everything is virtual. So it's easier but harder to get. Um, um, let's say a meeting, because it's easier because you could just jump on a zoom. But it's harder because those relationship builds its about person to person, right? It's about the connection that you have with somebody or traveling to have travelled to Russia and Malaysia to visit universities and before I was a director. But it's a similar type of thought process to be there to bring value to students, to bring value to organizations like a university. Um, you can really, I mean, not only do it in person, but it's a lot more valuable in person, right? So that's why I'm saying, through covert and doing everything virtual, you have to really up your playing field off, making sure that you are very approachable during a zoom, ask questions and stuff like that so that relationship build piece of a director is a little harder but challenging. But great. I'm all that mixed together in the in the current Cove it situation and other questions that you had was telling about work hours including, you know, spent work on So So travel right now is zero, but it usually is quite a bit of travel. I was traveling before, probably every month somewhere, right, so over a weekend or a Tuesday Wednesday, Thursday to different universities or different entities that are working on innovation. So I'm an innovation like guru and ecosystem builder for social innovation, which is part of what we do at the Center for Peace and Commerce. So where do I go anywhere that people need me right now with Zuma. Secondly, whatever people need me like you is getting on a zoom, bringing value to people, making sure that we are spreading the world about social innovation, about innovation in general, about peace, about commerce, about business. All of that is something that, as a director, you're constantly putting value out their value. Value value, mentoring people. Yeah, I'll be there. I'm connecting with other directors connecting with other service providers, other students, other universities. That's that, that ecosystem that you're building. Um and I think that one of the questions that I get a lot from, actually students and other, um, you know, suit undergrads and grad students is that do you need to be an extra vert to do this, right? How do you get this energy? So a lot of people don't know that I'm a complete introvert. I would love to just be reading a book in a corner, but because you are so passionate about connecting people so passionate about innovation, so passionate about I want to get students launching their businesses. I mean, the ego that I have of like, I want to be in a corner, like is away because it shines in that I want to make this impact. I want to be there for the students. I want to help them. How way I'm going to do it, man. I'm gonna do it right. So I think that it's not an extroverted versus introvert. It's more of like What is your impact and what is your why right? And my wife is a director for peace and commerce is to amplify social innovation in general, in higher education and secondly, is launching scale student ventures, period, Right? So you're really saying OK, that's my why that's my impact. That's my North Star. If I'm an introvert, extrovert, high hybrid, introvert, extrovert or whatever it is, I'm going to get to this right, because that's what really matters. And that's why I want to make that impact. That's the legacy. I want him. I want to leave behind me. I want a big bring up the next person that's more important that yourself, right? So I think that that's a question that I get a lot and this time of outward facing person, so weekly hours, including spent on travel and work at home. Right now, I'm working from home all the time, so that's always a challenge, right? Is that how do you manage being virtual? How do you manage doing tasks value? Add like these arm types of opportunities and getting like, you know, um, operations done in a In a position that I'm in right now and having three Children, I have, ah, college age student that came home. So how do you do that? So really managing everything That's a lot of a woman's. As a woman leader, you have to manage a lot

What are the challenges in a job like yours? What approaches are effective in dealing with these challenges? Discussing examples will help students learn better.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
I think the challenges of a job like this is, um, really making sure that you are, um, being very mindful of your time Right on. And I think that goes with any job that you have. Um is that what is a priority? What's not a priority? What do you need to work on today? What do you need to work on tomorrow? How do you build that out? And it's not that. Let's say you're in a job and, um, there's like, let's say my boss, right? She gives me my hi goals, right? That my boss is the dean of the school. So she gives me my hurdles. But I have a lot of goals that are task oriented. How? No. I work on these tasks. How do I communicate to her? I'm working on it, but not so detailed oriented so that she understands. How do we build this out?

What are the job titles of people who someone in your role routinely works with, within and outside of the organization? What approaches are effective in working with them?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
so the types of people that, um, and job descriptions that I worked with on a regular basis are at a level of people who can make decisions on their own for the company that they're involved with. Let's say somebody who's working a large organization like Sony or Qualcomm or Microsoft that are possibly in their community. Um, community outreach group that needs to be out of director position or a high level position that can have conversations. We could feel like myself about funding and sponsorship and opportunities for of the larger organization. And then usually, if it's a small organization, the CEO who I can talk to and say, Okay, what? How would it be to partner with you or to have a strategic partnership with you? And I would say that, too. The two definitions of those two is a partnership is just okay. We help each other, right? You have some mentoring, you come in. You mentioned for us as a CEO or maybe one or two of your other people. A strategic partnership would be okay. You provide this service and we have these students. Can you give any gifts in kind? Can you have a year long commitment with us to do X Y Z. So that's the more strategic partnership that is more part of the DNA of that company. Eso Those are the types of people that I work with.

How would you describe your management style? How has it evolved over the years? Can you tell about experiences or books that influenced your management style?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
My management style is 100% servant as a servant leader actually published a book on it s O because it's so important to be Ah, a leader for others. You serve before yourself. You serve others. You ask others you have empathy. You have high e que about how people are working in your company, how you're managing others. I'm asking them how you conserve them or what recommendations can you make for them. How do you bring them up in their career? Always them first. So that you agreed. An amazing team, an amazing team and ecosystem around you that really serves before others. Because you are also being that that example right of that servant leadership, right? Or that servant leader Ah, saying OK. So if I do it this way, everybody else will do it this way. And everybody is moving towards a better good right. Not a better good of themselves or you gonna better good of an increased r a y of a company or organization. It's about really making sure that everybody is a line to this servant hood, um of of, you know, bringing this forwards and the ways that you can be more of that of that servant leadership is really it's all kind of all over. Instagram usually is kindness and gentleness and, um, showing kindness to others, even not just your boss or your, you know, subordinate, but your peers as well. How do you build each other up? How do you support each other? If one person is marching in the black lives matter go march with them, right? Or if they are LGBT Q Ask them. How can I help you? How can I be your ally? Um, you know, not just say OK, great job. You're doing this and I'm over here. No, really Being really empathetic to everybody around you, asking them how you feeling today or having a smile. A simple smile is amazing, right? S Oh, that's how you build this culture of trust and reciprocity around yourself. And that's that kind of leadership that I always have emulated towards. And sometimes you feel like Oh my gosh, I should be more direct. You are pretty. I mean, I'm a type a person already set, like three times. I'm very much that goal oriented. Let's get this stuff done. Let's make the impact that we want to dio, but with grace and with a smile and never putting anybody down. Always. How do I pull the next person up? How do I pull everybody alongside with me? That's important, because that really allows you to multiply the impact that you want to make, like you know, it's, um, Mahatma Gandhi said that is that, you know, you throw a pebble in and that's the ripple effect. That is what you you need to to really, constantly be thinking about. And sometimes that ripple effect goes away from you, right? You feel like Oh my gosh, like, Whoa, where is it going to go? Where's my reach? Who cares? You know, you see the pebble, you know, you did that and you know you have the ripple effect and just own that and say, OK, I'm good. If you always do that, then nothing will come back to you and kind of mess things up. I was just talking to somebody. I was recruiting somebody and for a job, and we're having a job interview. So he's like, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah right? And I said, Well, you know, he says, What's very important for this straw. What's the number one thing that you're looking for? I said culture fit right, and he says, already know that about you, right? So that if you are always constantly thinking about others and you constantly have that leadership style, even when you're an undergrad, even if you think you're not a leader yet you are leader. First of all, um, and really thinking about that nobody will challenge you on who you are when something is challenging, then people know she's always saying the right thing I got challenged about six months ago was a press really oppress piece that was pretty deteriorating for me, right? It was like, Oh my gosh, that was out. That's not me, that she misquoted me. What's going on? People responded to that by texting me, saying, I know you would have never said that. I'm like, OK, so you know, by really leading and going along that path always, then nobody challenges you. Nobody says she's not that way. She's always this way, so I would say that that's that's my leadership style

How do you manage conflicts within and across teams? How do you promote trust, openness and a healthy work culture? Sharing stories will greatly help.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
um So this question about I'm conflict and how do you manage conflict? I think early in my career I would always be saying I deflect, right. I don't want conflict. Um, and most of term, when you're starting off, you can deflect, right? Because you're like, I'm gonna go underneath the radar. Right. Um and I always was about gland is the radar. I'm always gonna do my good work, right? Nobody needs to, like, pat me on the back. I don't need that right. But that actually doesn't serve me very well sometimes because I wanted toe fly. So under that, I did not promote myself enough. And I didn't. There was not not not that it was conflict, but it was like little things that I didn't stand up for myself. And I thought, I'm good. I'm fine. I'm just gonna keep on doing. But the more that you can speak up for yourself saying, Hey, I did do this or you know what? This you can You can change the conversation by saying I recommend this is that might not be a conflict that somebody says, Well, you should have done it this way. Well, I would recommend that we could. We could look at this situation. And the reason why for the situation is this. These data points again like I'm a scientist, so I'm a little biased on that aspect. So So, data pointing. I recommend this and this is the data points and just leaving like that, not making it personal, making it more about the data. And then also again, the theme shows through throughout this whole interview is that What's the North Star? What's the impact that we're all trying to make? So there's a conflict about something I always I don't deflect. Now I basically just remind people and recommend right. Remind them. Hey, our impact is here and there's some there's some conflict down here. Does that really make any difference to the impact that we want to make or any difference to the customers that were that were selling to or the stakeholders that we have? Then people kind of think you know what doesn't make sense like it doesn't really matter. Let's go back to the North Star. Let's go back to the stakeholders, okay? One of the stakeholders need Oh wow, They need this and we're we're challenged over here. Well, let's go over here. Let's get re focused on what's important. So again, not men, take it personal and and really neutralizing. That lets a personal attack by recommending and, you know, acknowledging that there's a different way to approach things. It's about impacts, about legacy. It's about stakeholders. Is about customers the core of what you're trained to, dio right? And sometimes it's hard because it's more like a detailed oriented thing that you're like, Oh my gosh is a conflict when I'm gonna do right But I think that just just reminding people about the why behind things gets people to kind of reframe, maybe an attack that they're having.

What indicators are used to track performance in a job like yours? Think of the indicators such as key performance indicators (KPIs), objectives & key results (OKRs), or so on.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
Yeah, you know, KP eyes Key performance indicators are really about that performance that you want to have, and the KP eyes are attached to smart goals. Smart girls are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound goals that have numbers that have time limits that have specificity, that everybody understands that. And then you can create a plan that really aligns with all of those things, right? So it's kind of like a pyramid effect right of saying Okay, the KP eyes here right then. It's like, OK, what are the? Some of the goals may be just one goal. Then it's like, OK, one of the two DUIs and who's assigned to those things? So it's it makes it sometimes feels like, Oh my gosh, I'm doing so much. It's like, OK, over overkill, right, that I'm building out every single thing for these KP eyes. But it makes sense because it decreases anxiety amongst the team. It increases. Let's say, um, challenges that might come up of like, Well, did you do this? Did you do that? What about this? And what about this number? No, it's all there. It kind of d d personalizes things and say OK, well, that goal is here. Do we hit it? And even if you don't hit it, I think that that's something that I talk about a lot. Is that okay? You might set a goal, right? A realistic goal, right? Not like over the top, but realistic. And you don't make it. Don't, like, beat yourself up. It's really think about why did it not work? Oh, interesting. The customers didn't like there was a link. There was a link missing in the, um let's say the stream of going from on a customer that is knowledge about your product to somebody who gets on your website to actually buy that. That process was broken somehow. Wear. Oh, interesting. This s e o was a live it off. Oh, well, if we fix that, could we get to the numbers that we that we actually had as a goal? I think that that's a very interesting discussion again that allows people to have a discussion about the UAE behind what you're doing. So so I would suggest command that people do have the smart goals, put him out there, And don't be scared. Have it really kind of tied into numbers and dates and assignments. And then again, if you don't a lot if it you don't make it, have a fabulous discussion about why we did it. Not tearing anybody down Just saying, Hey, what what was wrong? What was not was wrong. But what can we improve, right? And then switch those KP eyes or switch those goals to what you've learned, right? That's the learned by doing right Learn, grow, evolve, resets and see if you can match And then you're like, Wow, we superseded that. Well, that's kind of cool. That was just a s CEO fixed. Wow. Okay, great, then. No, those are Those are the things that are really exciting. To have people evolves. I'm through.

What qualities do you look for while hiring? What kind of questions do you typically ask from candidates?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
so I'm a little bit different than most people. So I always am going to look for culture fit first, right? Because I can always train somebody to do in excel. She I could always train something to do a better power point. Can Va name your platform? Anybody can learn, really? Right. You just have to take the time to have them are. But there if they're not very aligned to the why the reason why you're around the culture fit of reciprocity and trust and giving a mother, especially with with it's a program that I run for undergrads. If that student or that coordinator or that person that I'm hiring does not have that s o. C in them. I cannot teach that I cannot maneuver, that I cannot mentor that I have to have them have that that core sense of being and this course sense of giving and serving and trust from the beginning. So for me, it's the interview process. Is Mawr of asking that question up front? Why did you apply for this and see what the kind of you know? So you know things that he he or she responds and maybe ask another culture question similar to let's say, you know, have you gone on our website? What do you see as our core DNA of our organization? Because that allows me to understand a couple things. Do they do their homework, right? If they didn't, they'd be like, what website? Right here. Like hoof bad, bad form, bad form. Or they say, Hamlet on your website and some recommendations that I have are this or, you know, what I saw was you are always showing happiness, and you're always showing relationships. You're always seeing people communicating with each other. That seems to be something that is really important to you. Yes, Thank you for catching that. How did you catch up? What did you see? Oh, I saw this video and I saw this photo. And what I saw was this That gives me Ah, look into who they are and what makes them tick. And that's enough for me for the first interview, right? And what I do is I flip the interview. Then from then on, I said, um, what are your questions? Right? And if they say I have no questions, I'm like, if you should have had a question. First of all, right, if they have a question and the first question is, talk to me about your five year vision about the center. That means that that tells me that that that person is interested in strategy is more about like looking at the bigger picture. Where do you want to go? Where's your vision? Cause that's what's important to them. That first question that they ask is what's their first like Number one question on other questions that I've got well, but I've got in the past was What's the compensation? Well, obviously that means to me. They're interested in, like, the dollars and cents, not necessarily what we're all about. Because again, I've only asked two questions that are pretty high level. Right then I'm asking, What are your questions I've had people go into like, Well, what's the 30 60 90 day plan for the center? Okay, they're more operational. You see how by that first question, it tells me a lot. And then I answered movable, and they're like, Oh, wow, I'm curing us about this. Oh, curiosity, innovation. You know, they're telling me by the questions that they ask, Who they are, and then I leave it like that. So great. Thank you so much. Like, you have no more questions for me. And I already got all my questions answered, Right, Because I want them to break down the barrier. I don't want them to be like, so scared, E, Like, what is she gonna ask me? Right? I'm or of that piece. So I would recommend anybody. I'm a different type of person, right? But if you're going after a job, have those things prepared. What are your first questions? What would be your first question when you're asked, Do you have any questions? And even if all of your questions were answered because of the interview, maybe they super asked you, like, 10,000 questions. You're like, You know what? Um you answered all of my questions, but my 1st 1 was this. And I'm so glad we discussed this, right? So if my first question was the vision, we already talked about that. But, you know, ask them something that is a some because that allows you to let have them understand where you are, right? So hopefully that helps with with that an interview process everybody is different, right? And that I was really talking about that first interview. The second interview is more of okay. We already gone past this right now. These are the things that we need to kind of nail down about compensation about this, about whatever else there is. There's probably a bunch of different question answers. And if you get to, let's see if there's 1/3 interview, it's more of a do we really see eye to eye on things. You're probably at the very top of our of our candidates and tell me more about you, right? That's more of that third interview piece, so just be yours.

What helped you to stand out in your hiring process? How should someone prepare for an interview for a job like yours?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
um, great question. Eso I'm very spiritual. So before my interview, I really I just kind of like mindfully meditated in my car and saying, Okay, everything was going all over the place, right? So I said, OK, in my car before the interview said, Okay, Um, just just close my eyes and I said, Okay, I am good. I am worthy of this job. I really would be the best fit for this job and to visualize that whatever religion you are right to visualize yourself receiving that job because you really wanted right. And again that that is, if you really want that job, sometimes you're going after, like, 20 jobs, and one of them is like That's my my safe, my safe job, but the one that you really, really want. Let's talk about that. It's like you really want to be very honed in on why that you are ready for any questions. And if any question does come up, I know that you can breathe and then answer that question. You have all that it takes because you're going after that job. Even if it is, let's say, a job that you're going after. That's higher than you think. Or exactly where you are. I was exactly where I was. I was actually more prepared than that. That position. So I just wanted to be, like, very grounded. So you walk into that interview incredibly grounded and confident, right? Instead of being like, Oh, my gosh, your money late. Or like, even if you're on time, you're Russian, and you're okay. I'm gonna sit down. Okay, Good. And that that that will, That will kind of have that type of, like, anxiety will transfer to the interviewer. They've probably interviewed 1000 people, and they will feel that. But if they feel a calm confidence Wow, that's transformational, right? Cause then they're like, So why why are you here? And you're like, Well, I really love this job. I think I could make the impact that you really deserve. But that's what this conversation is all about, right? Right. And that's kind of how I started my my questions. I had the hardest person first. So, um, he asked me. He says, I'm gonna ask you the hardest question. I said, bring it on. He was Oh, okay. On that. He didn't expect that. Um And the question that he asked was a question that I absolutely loved to answer, right? So in ah position that I had it's more of like, How do you make the impact that you need to do as a university leader? Right. How do you measure that impact? How do you measure the impact on the students? How do you measure the impact pounds two different stakeholders? Well, that's a piece of what I do as a researcher. That I really love to research is how do you measure impact? That is something that's kind of a really interesting piece of economics and of of impact in general. So we went on for 45 minutes, talking about How do you How do you measure impact? Because both of us were very excited about it. It wasn't the deep tale of I might have been completely wrong, I told him. I said, You know what? That's a question. I get a lot and measuring impact is incredibly difficult and nobody gets it right. And he was like, You're absolutely right, right? Even though, even though I thought it wasn't the great greatest answer because he's an economic economist and I am not right. I knew where he was. So know that no, the interviewer who they are and secondly, is meet them where you where you are passionate about that. So I was very passion, like That's a question I get all the time. I'm not an economist. You are, but I know that it's very, very hard to to track. But what I have done is X y Z, and what I what I research and what I have read is X y Z and that we had a great discussion about what that looks like. And what does that mean for universities? Does that make sense? Right? So I think that that being being vulnerable, being uniquely you and I answer your question based on your passion is the way to go.

Can you discuss career accomplishment(s) that you feel good about? Please discuss the problem context, your solution, and the impact you made.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
so I think I would have to responses to that. Is that And this is something that I've been challenged even throughout my career is that you know, you wanna have this? I don't. The dawn I landed, I arrived. I have this great accomplishment, and that sometimes never happens. You're you're waiting for that like, Oh, and I've got in lots of awards, like award for, um, you know, diversity Champion of the year from Ex Economy. Um, you know, Forbes everything right, but it's like when it happens, you're like, Oh, that was in Oh, Okay. Well, next. Right. So I think that it's one thing as a buildup of your career, Um, be celebratory on the small winds, right? I even just got a text from one of my portfolio companies. And she's like, You know what? I'm I just wanted to text you and let you know how amazing you were as an advocate in the early stages of our startup. And I've never really to tell you that, but I was thinking about you today. Wow, like that is, like, super amazing. And I've had students that that sent me cards saying, You know, you were transformational, my career and even know that, like at the time, I was just doing my job right? And and mentoring students and growing startups and helping people. So I think that that that accumulative success of just being a good person and doing exactly what you need to dio and always be driven by that impact in that North Star you might be grinding all the time. But man is that successful and then, you know, celebrate those small ones even if it's a text, even if it is just like somebody like saying something nice to you in person. I mean, just those are the kinds of things that, um I think we don't realize because I've always wanted, like, the bomb. I have done this and I have arrived. I will never arrive. I'm always the grinder, right? I'm like, Let's go, Let's go, Let's be better. I can always be better. Um, I think the second thing is more of like, OK, it was a moment of I arrived and I'm like, Wow, this is pretty spectacular and I worked really hard for it, and it was just so surreal, right? So I was I applied to have a ted X talk. So, um and I've always wanted I wanted to do a Ted X talk. So I have had already applied three times and did not get did not get picked. And this fourth time I got picked, right, So I was like, Oh, my gosh, like amazing. But the process is so, so, so, so grueling like with speech coach and I've done like keynotes like I don't know how many keynotes I've got done. Lots of panels, lots of things like I'm good. But, man, did they challenge me, like, you know, really understanding at Ted Ted X. They want you to present a gift to the audience. What is your gift? And that was like, Wow, that's like, That's super like, um impactful you liked Oh, my gosh, what is that gift? And I'm really going to give that gift to the audience and the audience is sitting in front of you and you have the audience of the recording. You're like, How do I transform my my lecture? My talk, I'm It's on electorates. More talk into the recording and the audience. Right? So it was a really hard, grueling process and throughout the whole thing had lots of conflict, right? What? The person who was who was managing all good, but just kind of like, wow, challenging me here and there. And he always was saying, Well, the person was gonna go first. You know, I'm not gonna pick until the neck the last two weeks of this process. And I was like, I am not going to be first. I'm, like, the worst person I've had so much challenges. I've changed my talk 1000 and one times I'm, like, the worst student, right? Because I was so like, I wanted to be perfect. Um, imperfection. You're never gonna get there, by the way, um, and he picked me as first. I was like, Oh, my gosh, like, really, really want May 1st. After all that we've gone through, like, what's going on? Right? So that was just so like, meaningful and minds full that he did. And then, you know, when you're on that stage, you're like, Wow, this was really hard. And I'm here and I'm just gonna have to do it. It's all memorised. I've got it. And at the end, I was like, Wow, that was That was pretty amazing, right? And that was just It's It's something that I will always remember how I felt bad day and just, you know, no matter if I don't get a lot of views on my Ted X talk or anything, um, it's it's that it's that, you know, I think it's it was a hard thing to do and that prize at the end, we'll is that that really good Ted X talk that everybody was clapping at the end. It was just so it was so beautiful. And I had my family there and I had two of my students there, so just just like, amazing, um, piece of giving of myself and others giving of me and it just a great experience.

What responsibilities and decisions does one handle in a job like yours? What are the challenges? What strategies are effective in dealing with these challenges?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, adastra.ventures
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
So at extra ventures is a early stage venture group and fund for female led businesses. So it is something that we, you know, we do boot camps. We do accelerator programs to be able to have women launch and grow their businesses. I think the challenging thing is you don't know what walks through that door, right? You don't know who applies. So really, being able to be nimble in the responses that you have for each of the start ups that come through is challenging an awesome at the same time, right? Is. But the cool thing is that we do have such how do you mitigate that? But I was one of the questions. How you manage that is that you mitigate that by having a great group of mentors that my dogs sorry. There. Okay, So, um, a group of mentors and experienced people that I can bring on board to help that start up so it doesn't have to fall on my shoulders. And especially with two other partners, we can all work on work on it together

How did the school prepare you for your career? Think about faculty, resources, alumni, exposure & networking. What were the best parts?

Based on experience at: MBA, Business Strategy and Marketing, University of California, San Diego - Rady School of Management
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
eso you have. My MBA was two years long. It was at Rady School of Management at UCSD University of California, San Diego, and I picked it for the reasons of why the school is around. So I think that whenever you're looking at any MBA school or undergrad or grad students look at why they're around right. There's other MBA schools that are more corporate fabby or more tech, heavy or more internationally focused for like an international business on the green. Um, for for me it was innovation and startups and in San Diego, So I had my three kids. I wanted to stay in San Diego. I wanted to build more of my startup ecosystem in San Diego, So it made sense to decide on going after Radi right Rady School of Management. Um, so the parts of the MBA program that I like I was I was a different type of MBA because I didn't need to get the straight days like I didn't need to have that like I didn't need that sense. What I really wanted was to learn a lot and have all the opportunities that they gave us. I wanted to hone in on it. So I did a independent studies. I did all the projects that I could I didn't really care about that. A on the final I once. Okay? Did I really understand it? And I went after, like, the the purpose of why were were working on and sometimes, like, it was one class at my quant class. That was my hardest quantitative analysis. I wasn't very good at it, right. Um and that was okay. I didn't do good on my final. Still got in a because I can't do lesson in a um but, um, but I at a point of time, I had to have that That, like, thought process in my head is like, I'm never gonna be that analyst. But do I have enough to be able to understand the analysis? Yes, I do. Good. Great. That's all I needed. So that was my most challenging piece. The funnest classes that I had. Where to one is a negotiations class. That was super amazing, I think. Even though I knew that I was a good negotiator, I learned a lot about just the process of negotiation. Um, and the professor was amazing and gave me his own book for me to read. I mean, just like just that personal connection was great. And then the other class was our lab to market. So the final class that we had by doing like your senior process, your senior designer, a senior project as an undergrad, anything like that, I think a super important because you put a lot of your effort into it. So I really love that. And I think that what I learned to was that the n b a. School. Um, I just was so want instrumental for me in the alumni piece of it, right? So even though they didn't have a large and allow my program, they asked me one time. And this cut is really good for students to understand is that, um, they asked me to be part of a small project that they had about giving back to their sponsors. They said, We're like the tenure, I think, was a 10 year anniversary, and they said, Can you write a little note about what your experience was? And we'll take a picture of you and do you mind just coming in for a couple hours and Yeah, I could have said no, I could have said like That's not really aligned to what? Like is my career. But I'm like, Yeah, I think that's a great thing of giving back and really allowing the sponsors to know, Um, how important? My my my education waas So I went in. Yes. I don't look young. I'm an older student on Guy was okay with that and had some pictures taken of me. Um, and they had such a great reception from that that they said, Well, you know what? Let's take another couple pictures and put you on social media. Do you mind? I I really don't care, right? Sure, I'm not the prettiest, but let's just put it out there, right? And they said, Well, we've had such a great reception for that was about three months later. Can you come in for a couple more pictures, Mike? Okay, I'll put on my makeup again. I don't put on makeup all the time, but I make up. I'll go on in. I'll do the thing. I ended up on a bus on a billboard like a humongous billboard. Next, the freeway. Uhm uhm on like bus when you know, you sit down and you have the little bus terminals I was on that. I was in the airport, like on this. It was, like all over the place and wow. Like, so that small? Yes, that I said yes. Two of saying I want to give back Really magnified that small? Yes, Back to me. I don't use it. Don't put people's in people's faces that I was on a billboard. I have the pictures. And when it was there Sorry. People saying I just saw you on a bus. So, Mike Yeah, that's me. So it helped me be that bigger person, the ecosystem that I really wanted. It kind of amplified it just a little bit more that I was I was able to capitalize on that. Um So So really, really great opportunity. There

How did the school prepare you for your career? Think about faculty, resources, alumni, exposure & networking. What were the best parts?

Based on experience at: BS, Biology, Pepperdine University
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
my bachelors. Uh, it was interesting because I had just come from Venezuela. I'm an international student, so I was not born and raised in America. So I came to the United States as an immigrant when I was 17 years old to Pepperdine University. So for me, my BS was just kind of, um, getting used to the American culture. I couldn't believe that there was more than one ketchup in one more than one man is right on in the markets. There were paved streets everywhere. Um, just that's just the the piece of it that was, like, kind of Wow. Okay, this is America. And then, secondly, is that opportunities? Like there were so many opportunities. I just wanted to do it all. I came from a very small school, very small American school overseas. So this bigger universes, I could do anything. Wow. That's so great. So I'm not that I had a lot of confidence, to be honest with you people always ask, Did you always have this much confidence? Absolutely not. You know, I came here. Um, I didn't have a lot of confidence. I just kind of loved what I did as an undergrad. I was a biology major, so I was in lab all the time. I was a total lab rat. Um, and I actually know a couple of times that I lived in my car overnight to be able to do experiments overnight. So that's like the geek that I was has as a Zaha as a bachelor's and proud of it. So on. And that was at Pepperdine again. And that was just a great you know, It was a growth for me. It wasn't like this transformational thing. Um, that happened. It was just a growth for me. The United States growing, graduating, Um, and then I went straight into my PhD. So a lot people don't do that. They go Studio masters and then a PhD at the time for science is a masters was more like a terminal master's. You did two years of a small research project or you did two years more of classes, and then you're done right? But I was very interested in research. I really wanted to do a research project with this professor that I that I met at a conference. So again the conference as an undergrad, you just go after everything. I go after everything. If you love something, do everything do Conferences go to places. You know, There's always gonna be some kind of funding at your university. Ask asked for funding. I asked all the time. I'm Hey, do you have some funding for me to go to this? This, um um you know, conference. Do you have money to pay for my, um, my research paper to be Do just ask. Alright, Do as much as you can. So I met my professor at one of those conferences. I replied to Scripps Institution of Oceanography again, That is a very high level university and only like the straight A pluses plus, like 10 years of Adul, it's it's really hard. I did not have those those grades, but I knew him and I connected with him and I set of emails and I called him saying that I really want to get into your lab and I applied for a grant. So I bite a for a grant from the NSF. I received it, so he got three years of free graduate student in me. Boom. Right? So you make opportunities happen for yourself. Really um, go after anything and it will come to you if you have the passion and determination to to to put it forwards.

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? Please discuss the stories behind these lessons, if possible. Stories could be yours or observed.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
one of them I speak a lot on. So let me start there. So the 1st 1 is when you are given a challenge when you have a big life decision to make your at this crossroads, right? Let's go like this. Crossroads. Um, you really don't know what's in front of you. You don't know, right? And you don't know if you're gonna make the right decision. And people are gonna give you lots of input, Okay? Like, you know, when I give you the example of graduate student when I finished my grad degree, my PhD and going into the next whatever this was a lot of people giving you input. Do this. Do that. Want not don't do this. Don't do that. Yesterday Study that what you have to do is be very data driven of guests. Biases. I'm a scientist. Right. So, um, get all the data that you have together, right? And just kind of I'm a spreadsheet girl. Right, Almonte? Right. I'm all out. These are the pros and the cons. This is all the data that I have not biased sjust all the data good, bad and ugly. And you make the decision that you feel is best for you, right? And as a woman again, I'll give you the example. What happened? I had family, right? That's a decision. That's one of the things that's not just professional, right? It's all the things but all the data professional, personal, religious, cultural, everything on Just put it all on. And then you have to decide, and whatever decision that you make, you go forwards. You never look back because you can't say what if What if leva, You know, what about if this was changing? If I only knew this, I could have done a better job, No cool swords, just go floors and never looked back. You're gonna learn, right? As you go forward. You're like, Oh, I didn't have this Data said. But as I bring it in, Aiken, maybe transfer my my degree. This were my professional career this way, and that's okay. Pivots are ok, but that that piece of going forwards and not saying what ifs don't ever say that right. Say I had all the data that I had. The only data that I had was this I do not have the data from 10 years later I only have a date. And I made the best decision for me that I could at that time. And I went forwards and make the best out of it. Right. So, for example, when I finished my PhD crossroads, right, what do I do, Right. Dry going to academia? Do I get a job and pharmaceuticals? What do I do? Right. So I applied for a grant for a, um ah, to go on with the research that I was working on and I would have to move to UC Santa Barbara from San Diego. Right. So, man gosh, the grant was I mean, I wrote it incredibly well, and I've never not gotten a grant except that one after about 25 years of my career. So it was it We did not receive it. And then I'm like, Well, I can't move to Santa Barbara. She had no money for as you know, I was gonna go postdoc position with her with this professor shouldn't have any money. I didn't have any money to move there. So that grand idea of doing more with as a postdoc was gone, so I had to make So that's one data point. The other data point was, um, at that time, there was not a lot of jobs in biotech in San Diego. And so it's okay. Well, what am I gonna do with such If I and the other data point of if I want to go into academia, I will have to move. Some other university is going to give me some job, right? It could be a small one. I can't. I don't have any, like control over that. I just have to put it out there. And the other data point was that I had two Children. I had two boys at that time. One was two years old. The other one was about six or seven. And my 2nd 1 mice, two year old had is special needs. And we would be down Children's hospital three or four times a week. And I have to be his mom like I have, You know, he couldn't walk. He couldn't do anything. We didn't know if he was gonna end up in a wheelchair. So for me to leave San Diego as a mother of especially child, there's no way I could have done that like it Yes, I could have gone to Chicago, right, because they have a really great Children's hospital. But I couldn't. I just I just I couldn't I couldn't pull that away from him. So I said, OK, that's a data point. That's a very high data point. So I looked after things that were in San Diego and this one gentleman that I had been having great conversations with about science and general stem education. Women in stem. All of that. He says, You know what? I have a cup. I have this grant that finally came through. I only have a year, but I I want you to be my coordinator, okay? It wasn't that like, Oh, my gosh. Career move that I thought it was gonna be this professorship or even a researcher. It was K 12 outreach in stem, Right? Maybe it's not so like, um, like, high in the sky, you know, shiny, bright. But it was something I could stay here in San Diego for my son. And at the time, yes, I Looking back, I'm like, Wow, I should have, like, just buckled down and, like, sound a career and done the academic because I would have gone that road. No, like that was the data point that I have written. My son is now 17 and he's walking and he's playing football. And like, if I would have known that, I would've been like, I think he's gonna be OK But at the time, I did not know that I was like, I need to buckle down. I need to have all his doctors in a row. I cannot move away. So that data that that that that crossroads and all the data points together you I made the best decision that I could with the data that I had at that time. And I went forwards. Yeah, I could have said Now what if I can say that? But I don't write. I don't focus on that. I focus on I did the best that I could, So I think that that's like number one. Number two of kind of said it within that is. Pivots are okay, right? And a career you might be going down one road, and it's like you pivot to something else. It's okay, doesn't matter. You make the best out of it that you can you pivot and you don't look back, you pivot for the right reasons to go with data and looking at what is good for you. Maybe you have to take care of your parents, right? Like, um, and you have to take two years off because you have to take every pants. That's life, right? So, pivot, be good with it. Do what you needed to do and pivot back, or you might pivot and there's tons of opportunities that you didn't even know about. Then take them. Take him. Take that. Passed some trends. Like, you know, people have to have a salary that has benefits because they're there. So there their spouse does not. There's so many different pieces of it. Do what you need to do. You know, you have to take care of yourself. Um, I didn't think the 3rd 1 is, um, you know, be know what? How who you are, right. For me, it's impact for me. It's servant leadership. For me. It's to be the best version of myself, full of integrity. So I always say impact with integrity is my number. One thing, right? So I will never compromise on integrity. I will never compromise on impact. And if if on opportunity comes up to do that, I walk away, right? And I know that something else has happened because I have those two north stars. So find your North star, find what drives you. Because people will know that you are all about that right And they will hire you because of that, they will, like, reach out to you. They will say yes to you more often if they know exactly that you have whatever it is that you have is in line all the time. You're never been a stray away from that. And that's super important. Because sometimes it doesn't come back as an r o I as a return on investment on yourself. Saying okay, impacted integrity on my end. Uh, let's see our why on that? You don't know, But I'm solid and people know, right? Even like with this interview that I just had six months ago for the Center for Peace and Commerce, they knew who I was there, like you're full of integrity, impact. We want you then, right? That goes a long way

What starting job (after internship) would you recommend to students who hope to grow professionally like you? What other parting advice, dos, and don'ts would you give?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Jul 27 2020
so I think it depends unfortunate. My answers to a lot of things are It depends because if the internship is exactly what's aligned to your professional goals and all that, then focus on building relationships within that internships that allow you to be integral to what the functioning piece that you are working with. So if you really love the internship, talk to people within the group that you're working with or talk with people that air outside that working group. So they're like, Well, she can't leave or he can't leave because way told you need them right because they're so integral. So make sure makers make yourself indispensable, right? As an intern by building out relationships. Don't just come in and out. If you don't like the internship, that's it depends, and it's not really a line. Then take that as an opportunity to that You grew that you connected with people and see, How does that like? How is that trend alert to the next opportunity? So make sure that, you know, let's say your, um, your boss or whoever's in part of the internship opportunity knows who you are. We'll be apt to give your recommendation to people you know, Ask those questions. Don't just assume that that's what's gonna happen. Build those relationships. And when you leave, say, Hey, you know what? I'm looking for an opportunity in this arena. Be very like forthright. I'm looking for an opportunist arena. Would you be willing to write my letter of recommendation or any or a letter, or be a referral? Most people will say yes if you've done a good job, right? So I think what either of those two relationship building a super important but be very crystal clear on where you want to be If you want to stay within the organization, don't assume that they think that you do. You make it very clear. I would love state Google because I think that the culture is solder, that all the stuff, like all of that be very forthright. Something that was other questions with that. But I can't remember what other parting advice to the doors. Okay, so the jusen don't I think I already said that was one is the do is build relationships within the internship, so don't just go in and out do build relationships. Do do the best job that you can be curious, be innovative, recommend things, but with empathy. Right? So, like, you can't be like the first day and well, come in this in this in this because I'm a young person and I think you're doing everything wrong, Bad thing. But if you've been around for, like, a couple weeks and you see something, bring it up. Say, hey, you know what? I've been here for a while. I have seen this. And can I recommend something like this because I've done my research on this, So I know that you can, um um you know, be that leader within the internship process, but with the empathy and the understanding that maybe the people that are around no more than you, right, And they usually do but be be that be that person that they they know they can rely on. And I think the don't are, you know, to the ego should not be part of it. It should be that you are serving the organization that you're built. You're building that sense of of reciprocity, that sense of trust within everybody. So nothing that is not towards those things should be done so no eagle saying not arriving late, obviously. And even if you did something wrong, let's say something happens and you showed up late for work. That happens a lot with interns, right? Cause you're just like you're trying to manage. So many things say, look, you know, I was I was late because of X. This will not happen again. And don't do it again, right? I know that you're going to make mistakes. I was thinking a time. Thing is, it is a really easy example. But other things come up that might not have been so great. Own it. Say, hey, you know what? I am massed up here. Um, or I could have been better here. Or if if it's something that hits you and you're like, What? I didn't even know that asked him, Can I get some clarification about how I could be better? How can I improve? Because that allows them to say OK, well, here she might have messed up or didn't do it quite as expected, but they're curious to know how they can improve. Right, So that's the don't do that. But do mitigate it this way.