USANA Health Sciences Product and Business Data Analyst
University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business Master’s Degree, Information Systems
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How did you get to where you are today? What is your story? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
I mean, I kind of didn't know, but I wanted to do when I first went to college. Um, so I just kept taking some my general courses that required at my undergrad and ended about finding that I really enjoyed my business crosses a little bit more. And so I ended up getting my undergrad in economics. So my initial job after graduating from my undergrad was in the finance department. Um, and just working in that role for a couple of years, I started to really realize the importance of data. Um, and that didn't management on it. How, you know, if you put cracking it and you get cracked, results out. So that's kind of how I got interested in, um, more of the the i t side in the data analytics side. So I ended up getting my degree from the U my Masters business analytics and information systems. And it's helped kind of that meets my new rule right now, which I'm working as, ah, business and in product data analysts, Um, I'm not the same company, so that definitely helped, but, um, kind of working those bills gave me that, um ability, I guess in the knowledge to be able to get to the job that I have now, and it's kind of just spent a progression. I'm figuring it out a day at a time, so I wouldn't put too much pressure on yourself if you still don't have 100% idea what you want to do or how to get there.

What responsibilities and decisions does one handle in a job like yours? Tell us about weekly work hours, including the time spent on work travel and working from home.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
before Kobe hit, um, I would go into the office and my where I work. We're really good about work, life balance, which is important to me. And I could work somewhere like, uh, Goldman Sachs, where you're easily putting in 70 80 hours a week. But that's not really how the company I'm at work, which is nice. That's something that I look for in a job. Um, so I didn't really would work between 40 and 50 hours a week. Um, I have had the opportunity to be able to travel for my job. We're an international company. And so we have conventions in some of the different countries that would operate in and and, uh, for two years straight, I was able to go to Singapore for awake, um, for my job. But currently, I've been working from home since ah, since March. So for months now, So I just work from home. Um, they're not really strict on when I work. A lawyer is I get my job done than my responsibilities done. Um, so everything's pretty straightforward that way. So I'm still working about the 40 50 hours a week, but I will have to commute now, which is nice

What tools (software programs, frameworks, models, algorithms, languages) are typically used in a role like yours?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
So my will tire typical TV role because I still fall within the finance department. So, um, you know, finance people in accountants will love excel. So that's pretty much where a lot of my reports for a gun is. I build them out of that cell, but, um, I ride really heavily on sequel structural structured query language and all on vb eight. So if I'm trying to automate, um, some of my reports that I build all used to be the gate to be able to do that. Um, but those are some of the two biggest warrants I have tried to use a little bit of our on python it Isam web scraping, just Teoh all inmates, um, more parts of my job that are a little bit more mundane. Uhm, that don't like So I try and automated to make it better for me. But look there, some of the biggest ones in my my area um, I wish that we would use a little bit more mortals. I'm pushing to use more data visualization software. Um, whether that be MicroStrategy, which is what the company currently has a contract through, or whether it's Microsoft Power guy or Tableau one of those and I think that that could really benefit the group as a whole

What are the job titles of people who someone in your role routinely works with, within and outside of the organization? What approaches are effective in working with them?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
So I work if I'm doing one of the product analyses I worked really closely with, Um, we have a product for Folio Group. So my company has a different product offerings that we have, whether it's nutritionals, Um, like our mill replacements, our skin care line. So I'll work with kind of the individual, that kind of overseas and coordinates over those different product lines. Um, by I was also working over our shipping and jealousies currently. And so I work a lot with our director of operations and with our chief operating executive and the CFO, um, and ah, our director of project management. So I kind of worked with a whole host of individuals at the company. Whether they're from you know, ah, similar level is I am Teoh, one of the more senior C level executives. Um, it just kind of depends on the breath of the project, but really, I kind of worked with a whole host of different individuals at the company, which is kind of nice and in good experience, building

What indicators are used to track performance in a job like yours? Think of the indicators such as key performance indicators (KPIs), objectives & key results (OKRs), or so on.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
my job is pretty new. Ominous development. They created this position about a year ago. So you know where a lot of jobs, my job before all of our projects were basically driven off of a program called Agile. So it would have tickets that would kind of track so they could see how many tickets you're crossing off. Um, this one is more just getting big projects done. Um, that I'm giving in having a turnaround in a timely manner. Um, so there's not really any sort of software that we use Teoh track kind of my performance. It's more making sure that the date is right and beating a little tough to defend what I report. Um, if someone questions one of my numbers, I need to be able to back it up, um, and just getting projects done and having a quick turnaround.

What things do you like about your job? Were there any pleasant surprises?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
I'm I like that. My job enables me the kind of with it being more new. It provided me the opportunity to be able to Theo take it in the direction that I wanted. Um, so you know, if there's an area that I see that needs could use, um, some analysis, I'm free, the kind of venture that way, as long as I'm getting what's given to me done at the same time. But it's kind of it's nice to be all that haven't saying kind of warrior drop goes and what follows under your own girl of responsibility. So, um, I can't think it was like any like surprises other than it's just it's been refreshing that have a little bit more bag with an autonomy in my role. Then my previous ruling I had, and so let's I say, that was a pleasant surprise

What qualities does your team look for while hiring? What kind of questions does your team typically ask from candidates?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
Yeah, So I think typically what's prioritized and my team is you obviously want someone. I can do the job and in a lot of aspects of our of our competencies, um, just being you don't necessarily have things that are well documented or there's not necessarily might get a how to manual on Howland you the job. So a lot of it is kind of that ingenuity and tenacity, um, that the different candidates have to be able to show that even when they weren't given a lot of instruction, they were able to the kind of jumping and figure it out. Um, and I think that's like a really big thing that we look for someone that isn't afraid of challenges and is willing to kind of go out it on and figure it out around. But what's nice also about my team Is we really prioritised not just the the qualitative, quantitative, actual buttes of a candidate, but we also looked at the qualitative. So we want someone that that message well with the group um, being able Teoh have everyone where kind of their personalities align. Um, you know, really get along. It makes room or productive work environment. Um, so that's something that's really nice

What helped you to stand out in your hiring process? How should someone prepare for an interview for a job like yours?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
So, as I said, I worked for the company in a previous rule, so that definitely helped just the understanding of the the business and how it's been run. I mean, kind of understanding are different product lines and contribution margins on that. That definitely gave me a leg up over for some of the other candidates that we're applying for my job. But even if you don't have a role at the company that you're applying forward, uh, definitely the biggest thing that I could recommend is you need to know the company, um, going read their 10-K statements that they published that will give you a good idea of kind of battleground of the company and their in their current financials, and their current operational objectives were usually also included in there. So just do your research, and B is knowledgeable about the company as you can. And then also, really, I like to go through If I'm looking on your job application and I like Teoh the highlight, like the different attributes that they specifically or mentioning and then I like Teoh Taylor, my resume and kind of what I'm prepared to speak on Teoh really hit those he points just to help make it abundantly clear that you are what they're looking for. So other kind of just my recommendations and how I go about it. All right, you should.

Can you discuss career accomplishment(s) that you feel good about? Please discuss the problem context, your solution, and the impact you made.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
I really say recently, um, you know, I've been doing a lot on my plate. I'm giving the shipping role where I wasn't I wasn't familiar about it. And the person that kind of had been over it before me really hadn't taking in, like, a good job of understanding what they were doing. So I didn't really have a whole lot of instruction. So it goes back to that being. Lt's n'est kind of figure it out on your own. Um, just make that progress on your own, even without the guidance. Shorter than, though how from anyone else providing that to you. But, um, kind of digging through and better understanding things. I was able to actually find some, um, some gaps, your mistakes that have been made in some of the coating and and was able to point that out. Um, and so, you know, the I T team was able to put that on their next sprint. The fixed some of those gaps and past those up. So, um, just through that process of digging deeper, the trying better my understanding of the process, I was able to actually find those and then point them out, which has saved the company. You know who thousands of dollars rinos. So that's that for a good feeling

What is a future career path for professionals in your role? How long does it typically take to advance through various roles? How easy are such promotions to come by?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
so I know what for me, Kind of. My my goal is I eventually want to become more in the date of signing. It's Rome, where I'm getting more involved in in your statistical programming languages like pie Phone and are, um, to build different programs. Um, that's really kind of a goal of right. Um, I'm not sure if it's typically the traditional, um, career path, but, you know, I think career past can go every which way, and they can kind of bounce around. It's It's you deciding kind of what you want, what you enjoy and what you're looking to get out of a job. And that's kind of what decides your career path. I don't think it has to follow any one necessarily one route or path. Um, but definitely. I think, um, you know, I'm not sure how long it could take the advance of those, because it it also depends on no, if they have turned over in that position. Know if you've had people that are long tenured in those positions and they don't need to bring on a new head count than that kind of limits your ability to be able to progress into that. So I think kind of the the timing of it is usually dependent upon the company in the job and kind of their turn over process. But a good way to kind of make sure that your your that person that comes to mind if it opens up is to just make those connections within the company. So I'm always trying Teoh be involved with the Business intelligence group. And, um, you know, I've been that working with their team and getting more involved with their team. And that's kind of the process that you have to go through still that, um, you know, and ask questions about the data scientist rocks. You know, trying. I am word from them while they're still there, and through that process, you're showing an interest in it. So if that position ever opens up, then you know they'll think of you. And though they'll pull you in

What responsibilities and decisions did you handle at work? What were the challenges? What strategies were effective in dealing with these challenges?

Based on experience at: Financial Analyst, USANA Health Sciences
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
So, as a financial analyst, I was over our pricing of our products. And so it's It was definitely a difficult position. They be in, um, because you're not Onley having Teoh to balance. Um, kind of there's there's that price gap. It's a boob of balancing act between, um, we have price. And then we have points that go along with it and the points or what artist shivers that sell our products or paid out on. And, um so it za bouncing active, balancing the distributor's, um, kind of what they're looking for and what our board of directors and just the financial health and longevity of the company and trying to balance that out as well. Also keeping in mind the consumer on the end, um, where we need to give them a good product but make it so affordable because no one can buy it if it's if it's not affordable. And so it was a little particularly challenging, and some of the markets that I was over Philippines, for example, was a very price sensitive market it on. No, you have families there that are living off of 40 U. S. Dollars a month. Um, And then, you know, you consider the price of some of our products, and that's that's a lot for some of those families to be able to afford. Um, so trying to do to balance all that was definitely not easy. But, um, the best way to do is just to communicate. And really, Teoh, you know, if you can't bring the price down to really communicate some of the benefits of the product and why our product, it is priced higher than some of the competitive products that you find in the market. You know what? If you're going to private hire, you need to be able to support that, um, with the science behind it in the ingredient debt and showing how much war they're getting in our product than they were in a competitors product. So I stayed. That was definitely probably the biggest part of that job. Um, that just pricing in dealing with the different markets and therefore markets have different constraints. So trying Teoh trying to go with that, and then the language gap is also always a little difficult as well

How did the school prepare you for your career? Think about faculty, resources, alumni, exposure & networking. What were the best parts?

Based on experience at: Master’s Degree, Information Systems, University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
Oh, definitely being old to think in a more technical matter. Um, in my particular position, coming from more of the business side from the finance side and wanting to get into the ICT inside, there definitely is a gap there. Um, I need you. They about their jargon that they here was and it's not. And there's a big gap. Sometimes in the communication between those two sides of a business and so trying to move from one to the other, that's definitely not easy to do. But a lot of the courses that were offered in my Masters program kind of helped Give me the skills to at least be able to you understand what I'm asking for, um, and to be able to kind of start bridging that gap. Um, but also, it was able to give me some of the skills to be able to get the position that I have now. Um, no, particularly my data mining classes. And my big The analysis clashed those classes in particular, I was able to really, really touched on in the interview process to be able to get to my current job. Um, and I think it is It is also good in the university Teoh network with people at other companies. Um, because sometimes you find out better ways of doing something that in other companies and, um implementing that you can take back to your job and incurring better processes. So there's there's that sharing of best practices and and just all in all, getting to know more people within your space, Um, and getting comfortable kind of putting yourself out there. So I would say That's kind of definitely like the best part of a master's program, and I really particularly enjoyed my master's program. A lot of professors, um, are actual leaders and business people. So they use this skill at companies, and then they teach just to kind of pass it on and a lot of a martyr of alumni of the same program. So that was definitely fund as well. You can ask him practical questions about their job. Um, then it just kind of helps may get rule what you're learning about

How did the school prepare you for your career? Think about faculty, resources, alumni, exposure & networking. What were the best parts?

Based on experience at: Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Economics, Westminster College
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
I'm in my undergrad. It definitely was. I wasn't working full time during my undergrad, so I a lot more free time. And, uh, so I was able to play sports during my undergrad. I played all four years, um, for a lacrosse team there. So that and then I think Westminster is a really small, um, college. It's about the same size as my high school waas. So the class sizes were really small. Um, my biggest classes were maybe 35 40 students, and I had a small the crosses, like, 10 to 15 students. So having that small environment enables you to really get to know your professors on a personal level and, um, make better connections with your professors and with the fellow students in your classes. And so I I think just kind of that, um, environment helped me to be over one. Better. Um, I give a lot better kind of with that personal touch to schooling versus, um, no, a bigger university kind of getting lost in a couple 100 student big class, but, um, I Yeah, I'd say that was probably, like some of the better parts of my undergrad. And the good things about it and what I enjoy

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? Please discuss the stories behind these lessons, if possible. Stories could be yours or observed.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Jul 22 2020
I've definitely got in some advice throughout my career. Um, and I say probably one of the most memorable pieces. Waas, um I was asked a question, and I honestly just didn't know. The answer is firefights the person and just said I don't know. And, um, a coworker at the time, one of the analysts when I was just an intern that pulled me aside. And, um, give me the word of advice that even if you don't know, go through the process of figuring it out, um is that will give people the trust in you. So if they have questions, they can come to you, and it also enables you to It shows that you have there that inter fortitude to be able to go in storage out those answers. Um, they're not being kind of just passed up passing the buck. Um, but also through that process and integrating that, that advice I was given it helps you to learn more about the company. I mean, kind of learned someone more than inner workings of it, and it makes it easier. So you know who to go to if you have a similar question again. Um, and so that helps. Was kind of that networking within the company, the figure things out. Um, another piece of advice I was given was, um you need Teoh go from a position of you needing the company. Teoh the company meeting you. And the way to do that is just working. Runoff? Um, no outwork over co workers. Show up before your manager and leave after manager and just just work until you know, you get to that position. Um, because once you do, once the company realizes that they need you, um, it kind of provides that job security, and it's how you grow in the company. It's how you move forward and move up in that career path. Um, 31 I think a lot of people take their jobs very seriously, and I'm more than I'm more of the mindset that your job is what you get out of it. But you also need to be able to enjoy it. Um, and I see so many times I am some other departments where they really their managers couldn't care less about them, poison our personal lives on their own struggles, and I I personally don't agree with that. I think that, you know, you spend more time with your coworkers than you do with your family if you're actually going to the office and so being a getting more involved, um, with your for workers and getting to know them on a personal level. And, um, not taking life so seriously is, I think, the way that you can find more fulfillment in your job, not just in kind of your responsibilities, but outside of that as well.