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How did you get to where you are today? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path? What inspired you to start your training institute?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
Okay, great. Thank you. Professor Gaga, for this opportunity. Very interesting one. That that, um So Thio answer your your 23 part question. First of all, I grew up in a very international atmosphere. Um, well, I was born in France, Uh, and at the age of five, my my father took the whole family thio Santa Barbara, California, Um, and to become a professor s. So, you know, I was born in France, raised in in California. I really got an international field for life. I would come back Thio to Europe every summer, and that was always really fun. I was always knew I want to have international career though I was trained and did my education in a in California in my university, I went to university in Santa Barbara. I did my MBA, um, at Thunder board and and Phoenix in Arizona. I always had this, uh, this passion for going international and also as a professor's kid education was always very important. Technology was always very important. Eso after my career, after studying, I always wanted to be in technology. Not that the technical side, but the outside. You know, I'm a business guy um So I worked a lot in selling technologies. ATT's first My my career was in the US, but through my MBA that didn't exchange in in, uh, in France, Another very good school called HTC. Um, right. So I've been in Europe for last 15 years, mostly selling technology, But my passion has always been education, and I've always been looking for a way to combine both. Um and I had this opportunity After having many corporate jobs about four years ago, a zai moved. I eventually made my way Thio Zurich, Switzerland, on the international path. And I had this opportunity four years ago to kind of quit, uh, selling technology and, uh, to combine my passion for education and and technology. Just a long, you know, long story short. We found out about the coding academy in the U. S. I know they're really big. Maybe most many of your students have heard of them. Eso I ended up in Zurich about 10 years ago, and we found out that we looked around and we noticed that there were no coding or data science academies in Switzerland, and that's when it clicked. So four years ago, we started propulsion Academy, um, again, Combining it was a perfect fit for me. We teach technology and its education is very practical. It's for people that mostly already have degrees. So, yeah, that's what led me, really to where I am today in the shortest E could talk about it for another couple hours, but I was trying to hit the key spots.

What training programs and courses do you offer? How much time is spent on in-person and online classes in a week? How many weeks do students typically take to complete?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
when we first started four years ago, Uh, we offered to court programs. The first one is called Full Stack Development or what Development? We teach you how to become a software developer. The second one is data science again. Um, this is 12. These air 12 week course is both of them full time, right? Uh, and they're designed for you to give to get a job in these fields. Once you've completed the course, right? So 12 weeks full time, we expect you to spend 60 to 70 hours a week in the classroom, Usually our courses or in person. But of course, with co vid we had to adapt our model eso in Switzerland there was a little different than the US we've gone from in person to online, back to in person. And now we're back to online, uh, way with our academy. We we we did both, right, So at one point, we were doing a half class one day, half class the other day, So um yeah, it's a mixture on DNA now with covert. Also, there is a huge opportunity. We now offer our clothes, our classes, fully remote eso for somebody that living in Switzerland or in Spain can take our program fully online. And it's also lead us to offer more courses. But for experienced professionals so now we also in terms of our core programs. We also offer courses on Python that Aaron Short you know, short term, part time format. We offer courses on AI for leaders. SQL We're going to some new Blockchain. So, Cove, it has been a huge opportunity. Um and yeah. So again, our core programs, 12 weeks. But then we have another available fully on fully remote, and now we do specialized courses for industry professionals.

What process do you follow for creating and updating courses? How do you ensure the relevance of topics and material covered?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
That's an excellent question with our value added is our relationship that we have with industry. Um, so we are extremely close to the industry for two reasons. One and industry hires are students. So we get, you know, then we get everything a lot for through our students. Second of all, half our courses are taught by external instructors from industry. Um, so this make sure that we're tuned to everything that happens, and we can adapt our curriculum accordingly and fast. The thing about being a coding academy, that's great. Um, is you know, we're independent, so weaken, weaken, go. We can change things really, really fast. Um, if if the next program is cyber security, we can create a third program as long as we see demand for it. But again, our value added is how quickly we adapt

What criteria do you use to admit students and what are the various student profiles in your programs? What kind of career growth and jobs could students get afterward?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
Let's let's talk about these two court programs. So full stop development on data science we do to assessments. One is a non technical assessment. We talk about the program we asked about the students objective. We just wanna make sure that it's the right fit. 12 weeks. There's a long time. It's a tough program challenging program, very rewarding eso we do our first a non technical interview on. Then we do a technical assessment. So for the full stock program, for example, no matter the coding experience, everybody has to pass a JavaScript challenge. We we send the students about two weeks to prepare with sending tutorials as long as they work hard and do it, and we test them at the end for an hour a song, as they put the work in that could get accepted. 70% of our students usually have some coding experience, but 30% the rest don't have anything. And that's what's really great data. Science eyes, different data science. Usually most of our students are masters or PhDs from the sciences or engineering are looking to go into data science because there are a lot of jobs and data science on again. Then they also have to do a non technical interview and a technical assessment. It's a mixture of python, a python challenge and a data challenge. Right. So, uh, these two different profiles full stack. It's anybody. It could be a professional dancer. It could be a mechanical engineer. Our data science students can come usually arm or scientific or warm or engineering and eso these two programs. Uh, the full stack. We help our students, we open up our network, we try to place them, uh, with jobs and the same thing for the date assigned students.

How do you enable collaboration, social interaction, and comradery among students? Do you use any software, host online or offline events, or follow any processes for this?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
Well, first we tried to. The first thing that we do is we try to select students. Um, that will get that are ready for the program. And our programs are quite complete and quite challenging. So we typically get really motivated positive students. Eso our application format is already a good source of Ah, you know of making sure that people that come to our program already and are gonna be positive after that. If you put a bunch of like minded individuals in inside the classroom, you are more than guaranteed that they're gonna get along, right? Of course we do group projects. Um, we we tried every other Friday, We throw parties, you know, at on, uh, kind of like a t j f. But really, the fact that thes thes students are taking our program and you know, are so committed already there. You already starting off on a good base. Um, so after that, um, yeah. Teamwork group projects. Uh, yeah, camaraderie. It all comes together, right? In terms of software, do we use a communication? We use slack way, have our own built our own internal platform for the materials. Yeah. So it's basically slacking our internal materials. You don't need much. You don't really need much else for for what we do. Right on. Get Get! Get lab, get lab.

How do you support your students for internships or jobs? How do you prepare them for job interviews? How do you provide networking and mentoring opportunities?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
So the first thing that we dio to support our students for jobs is that we make sure that the programs air complete enough for them to get jobs hiring in Switzerland, probably one of the most difficult, higher hiring requirements in the world. Right? So we have to make our program challenging and very complete. That's why we teach it technologies that we dio. And that's why we we screen people before they come in, right? So one, the first thing you have to teach them the tech skills or the hard skills. But second of all, we're also teaching the soft skills such as, you know, getting his resume together, refining and Lincoln strategy. We also that's included in towards the end. You know, we coach them, we interview preparation. Um, so we you know, we combine these tech skills and these soft skills. That's a really important part. Um, then, as I mentioned before, we opened up our network. We have 350 graduates, so we try to put him in contact with other alumni on you know, we do industry projects. Every students the last three weeks they do a capstone project that's usually by a company from industry s. Oh, well, you know, that's always a foot in the door. We try to make. It is practical is possible. Connect him with his many companies assed possible. And our team is pretty senior. Eso We also, you know, uh, coach them in any way we can, uh

How do you assist students in paying for your program? What kind of scholarships and financial aid are available for students and how can they avail those?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
So are our programs are extremely competitive in Europe. Also, we we have the advantage of being in Switzerland, which is a fairly, you know, it's a fairly rich company country. So our goal is to keep the tuition costs a slow as possible. So we don't have to offer payment plans or, you know, take a part of your salary for the next two years. Eso way also. Yeah, way Try toe. Well, it usually works out, right? Are tuitions. People can pay them. It's, you know, it's about 21,000 francs, which in 3 to 5 years for a student is one month salary. Right. So in the US, it's about double the cost. But the US has this huge system, uh, network of loan with student loans. Um, yeah. So, as far as I know, our student tuition hasn't really, really been a problem. Um, for for students. So luckily, we don't have toe that problem in terms of scholarships. Yeah, we, uh we're looking in the future or if we find the right partner, we'll offer them

What marketing software and channels do you use to find and engage prospective students? Which are less effective? Which one do you recommend to students to learn?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
our two biggest channels. It's not rocket science. It's Google. AdWords in Lincoln, right? We've been disappointed by Facebook. We tried that in the past. Uh, instagram is okay. Our crowd is not that young. It's not, You know, maybe some millennials, but, you know, usually our crowd is over. 20 23 25 average age of our courses. 28 29 30. So, uh, marketing also a lot of content. Ah, lot of FC. Oh, you know you with Covic. You can't really do that does many events. But events are also very important for our corporate to get corporate partners in these things.

How has the demand for certain skills and technologies changed? What kind of jobs would see big growth in the upcoming years?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
Well, my answer is biased, obviously, because way are supposed to get the forefront of of the jobs. And I think that we are obviously software developers. That's our full stop class. Those are gonna be a demand for the next. I would say maybe 100 years, 200 years before everything gets automated. Andi, I think data science is well, that's why we teach them on. That's what we have. Don't haven't had a third course yet. We think that software developers and and data scientists or any you know, thing to do with programming or automation. Um, these anything to do with automation is the jobs of the future. Um, obviously, we've seen that with co vid. We've seen those. The less technical jobs, those are the ones that go first, so

What were the major exciting and memorable moments? Were there also any moments that almost got you to quit? How did you get past them?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
it's been It's been a tough It's been a very tough and rewarding challenge, right? We didn't start out with a US style. Siri's a serious be type of investment, all right? We had to build this thing brick by brick. Um, so in terms of memorable moans, I think getting over the first year, the pilot year, uh, that was that was really a big milestone. Um, after that, it's been, you know, it's been steady growth. Obviously. You want more beginning over the first year graduating the 1st 50 students. Obviously, you want more students in the first year, but, you know, a soon as you get students in the classroom, you start taking pictures, get the social media machine going. Um, were there are also moments e mean, of course. You know, you don't always hire the right people in the beginning, even in the middle. You know, it takes a lot of, uh it drains you less Unless you, you know, drink It can drain you physically. Um, you know, you can also have ah, couple outside factors. You know, you always have the feeling that people are against you when you start, and you just got to get over it. I wouldn't say I was. I would ever thought about quitting. It's just about overcoming and yeah, you just, uh You said I had thick skin on. Do you have to get over it? And, you know, tomorrow's another day. Good. There's bad news comes and so does good news. And you just gotta wait for that. Good news that come again? Yeah.

What college programs did you attend and what were their best parts? How did each of your college programs prepare you for your career?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
so, yeah. I mean, I'm a big fan of of education. Universe have a universal product of the university. Um, right, obviously. Um, I want Thio. I did my my undergraduate at U C. Santa Barbara, which I believe you're in Utah, right? So it's not so so far. I mean, you're you're towards the West Coast. Um, s o I did my my undergraduate in business economics. I worked for four years in the software company, and then I went back and did my MBA in Arizona at Thunderbird s. So what was the best part? Um I mean, the best part is that you get to spend four or five years to really concentrate on learning something. Um, I think that that z that as a young at the young age, I think that's the best. You know, you're in learning mode. Uh, and you tryto if you really take it seriously, you try to get the best out of every class, you know, you're going to take so many diverse, you know, your oceanography, black studies, physics. You know, you really get the reverse thing. Um, so in man, be a I think, more than the education itself kind of like propulsion. It's the great people that their program like that brings like minded people. People want to go move forward. People will wanna have fun, but work hard as well. Um, so I think, um, I don't think you know. Now you ask me, how do they prepare you for your career? I definitely think the traditional model of education needs to be revised. There's definitely a lot of waste in education. Um, especially, you know, both at both levels. Boast at the undergraduate and and the graduate level. Um, yeah, I think, um, classical traditional education can alert on a lot from coding academies in terms of getting to the practical stuff, right? Making it mawr industry specific. I think the biggest weakness of traditional universities is the way they prepare you for a job. If you're a computer scientist or if you're a pretty technical e mean employees, then history will forgive you. But if you come from other disciplines, I mean, I don't think you're fully ready. Um, I think that it's just 30 in the water and try to tell you to swim. I think that I think there should be more focused, Um, and more practical and more specific, but again, Still a big fan. Yeah,

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? If any, please also discuss your experiences facing adversity, or trying something unusual.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
You know, as I mentioned, one of them is, if you know, if you fall down and then get back up some good news. Good news is always, uh, bound to happen. Um, a second thing. Um, e think that this is a lot one that some people really agree with her. They don't be nice. Be positive. Be nice to people. Um ah. Lot of people think Well, no, don't be too nice. People walk on you. I think if you're nice to people and you and you show them that you appreciate what they do and you're very sincere, and I like people, I think in the long run, you'll be better off. Of course, some people might take advantage you, but in the long run, Um, uh, it's, uh it's always gonna work out for me. And I look around on my 20 colleagues now who are all great people, and I just really love them. And I will continue to be nice to them. This as long as we work together because they appreciate it. The third one. And this is not rocket science. You just gotta work your ass off. Nothing comes magically. Uh, some people don't understand it while you're working so hard. But if you really believe in something on, you believe in making a difference. Um, there is no other way than to just work. And I'm not talking about working day and night. So you gotta work strategically, work on the most important things. Um not not. Don't work just for the sake of working. Yeah.

What starting job (after internship) would you recommend to students who hope to grow professionally like you? What other parting advice, dos, and don'ts would you give?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
Um, yeah. Actually, I I wrote this down because I didn't know quite the format. We're gonna do it in, um, the number one that I tell young students either when they come out of high school or university. Do not underestimate the importance of technology. Like, and I haven't looked at your program, but Utah, but learn to program. It doesn't matter what How far you get if you're actually gonna become a software developer, there are too many, you know, You want to know how developers, uh, think take a basic program? I think it's really important because that's the way the future is going. If you're gonna be the next you know, uh, Jeff Bezos or or Berg Zuckerberg or, you know, Bill Gates, those those guys all could code. Right? So, um, that's a really, really big advantage. Mhm. The other thing. Um, there are too many generalists on the market. You can see with co vid. You have to have some kind of technical skill. Um, doesn't matter what you do with it. The other thing, um, is I would say, if you you pay your juice, pay your dues, not everybody's gonna not everybody's gonna be Mark Zuckerberg and at 20 to be, you know, a billionaire 23. It takes time. You have to learn the tricks of the trade. Alright, don't wait too long, but especially if you want to venture out and be a non preneurs work for a big company, see how it works. See the see the efficiencies and the inefficiencies And then if you're ready to go out and I think everybody at some point in their career should do their own thing, Um, make sure you have learned, ah lot and last one also, it's important for your for students as well. Um, you know, building Network University, I think that's really important. Especially MBA. Um, it's hard to find when you when you go out on your own and you look for people to hire, it's hard to find good people, especially people you can trust. So if you build a good network from university all the way to grad school of people that you know, you can you know how they work. You know how they party. Um, you know who they are. Um, keep those on your Rolodex. Definitely