Boot Camp Digital CEO, Bestselling Author, Global Speaker, Professor and Digital Marketing and Transformation Leader
Harvard Business School Disruptive Strategy
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How did you get to where you are today? What is your story? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
sure. Yeah. So I'll give you the Reader's Digest version. But essentially, I started my career. I went to school for business when I started my career working at Procter and Gamble. So while I was in college, I did internships. One of them was that PNG. And then I got hired there when I graduated and absolutely great company to work for. So I learned a lot, and I loved it. But for me, what was missing? Waas. You know, I wanted to do things where I had a bigger impact. So when these companies, you know, the decisions were made a long time ago by, you know, people 10 times higher than I waas. And so I really felt like, you know, I wanted to do something where I was more making decisions that would directly influence what was happening. And so I started working part time weekends and evenings for an Internet startup, and this was back in 2000 and seven, and eventually that company got funded. So I left my job to go work there full time shortly after it sold. And so I took some time to figure out Okay, what do I want to Dio. And while I was in decision making mode, a few people approached me, saying like, Hey, could we hire you to consult with us? Or could you teach us how to do this stuff? Because I had digital marketing experience when a lot of other people didn't. And so as I started getting requests, I thought, Well, yeah, I could start a business from this And it was interesting because at the time, I was interviewing for a pretty senior role at an ad agency and I thought, Well, you know, if I take this job, it's on their terms A lot of hours. I don't know how much I want to do that after working for a startup, whereas I was getting the same clients on my own. So from there I started boot Camp Digital. It's now been over 10 years. I've written six books on digital marketing. I speak all over the world and I love what I dio

Can you walk us through your first few weeks, especially challenges, when you started working as a consultant? How did things change over the next few months?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
So, you know, I started my own business, and I've coached like thousands of businesses and start ups over the years. And, you know, to me what I always think is that, you know, unless you're doing a true startup where you need some kind of scale, the best way to figure it out is if people are willing to pay you money. So for me, you know, I know people who are like, Oh, I'm gonna become a life coach. Great. But, you know, you're more likely to fail than succeed. So if people are willing to pay you money, great. But you know, people are always going to say everything is a great idea. That doesn't mean they'll pay any money for it. So for me, it was actually pretty easy because my first client was a Fortune 500. Um, the work was stuff where it was easy for me to do, but big impact for them and a lot of the work I do is like that because I know digital so well, I can tell them small things that can, like, really, really change their outcomes. So at the beginning, it wasn't that hard for me in the sense that what I did and my strategy, which is still relevant for businesses, is I didn't go out and hit the phones and be like, Hey, does anyone need a digital marketer? I I use more inbound marketing, right? I established thought, leadership. I had a blogger and this was back in the early days, but I had a blogger I wrote about social media and online marketing. I posted a lot in LinkedIn and linked in groups, and I was visible in the industry. I went to industry events, and so most of the business that I got was people who new me, not in person. But they saw the things I was posting online and said, Man, we need her to come and help us and so I still, you know, maybe it's partly because I have a marketing background over sales, but I still think that inbound marketing approach, even for a solo business owner, is a lot more sustainable and feels better then this sort of aggressive sales approach where I feel like a lot of people, spin their wheels and don't get as money faults at the end

What tools (software programs, frameworks, models, algorithms, languages) do you use at work? Do you prefer certain tools or services more than the others? Why?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
favorite tool period is a sauna. It's free. It's like a task. I mean, it's a to do list app or task management, but it's actually like my whole company uses it. And what it's great for is team collaboration or dealing with recurring tasks. So one of the things that people will say to me is, Oh, you're so organized and it's funny because I'm like, inherently the least organized person you would ever mean. So I systematize and process size everything, um, to compensate, which I think, actually has turned it into my advantage, because when people work with us, that's what we always hear is like you guys are on top of things. You know exactly what's happening, and it's because naturally I would stuck really bad at it. And so asana is the biggest thing for me because it keeps me focused on what do I need to do and what do I need to get done for the day? And that's probably the number one thing that helps my productivity the other thing, which, like maybe this isn't that exciting for people or it's surprising, but I find Facebook groups are extraordinarily helpful from a professional standpoint in that, you know, we had we used a certain software for our emails. We had problems. Someone of my team has spent, like, tons of time. We could never get it worked out. I go into this group a post about it, have three people giving the answers. I found a consultant that I hired, and it was fixed right away, you know, and I think sometimes we feel like we need to figure out all the answers ourselves, but resourcefulness with groups and using other experts. And I think people are really generous with their time than a lot of ways. Now, Andi, that's the other big thing for me is finding these communities where if I'm stuck or I need something, there's people who are willing to help. And, you know, I also try and help in those communities when I can do. But those were probably the two biggest things that I think like are impacting my ability to perform well

What are the profiles of your clients? What kind of projects do you handle? What skills are needed in these projects?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
we're a little different in that We focus on training and capability development. So we're not in the agency that you're gonna hire to do your digital marketing. We're going to show you how to do a better yourself, whether you're a marketer and you're managing an agency or your d I y. Or you're a startup or entrepreneur. So our audiences range a little bit. But our goal is to transfer as much of what we know into your brain. So we're not the consultants that are gonna be, you know? Well, no, you have to do it this way because I know because I'm so smart, we're going to tell you exactly why in house so you could just do it that way on your own. And so we do mostly training a little bit of strategic consulting as well, so building digital strategies for business and things like that. But all of our aim is thio transfer that skill and knowledge to the people we work with. So, you know, we work with big companies. Actually, Facebook and Google have both been clients. Um, Procter and Gamble, General Mills, Nike, Harley Davidson. So all these companies, you've heard of, but even more you haven't heard if I'm not going to tell you their names because it doesn't mean anything. But we work with a lot of different companies with that common thread, though, of how do you grow the capabilities internal? Because what we see, what digital is, you know, even young people, they're digital natives, but they don't know how to grow business on it. They don't understand how to translate a marketing strategy and, you know, focus and make choices. Well, based on that. And, you know, we look at people in senior roles. Digital wasn't a thing when they grew up, so they're managing stuff without the intimate knowledge they would normally have by the time they got to that point in their career. And so those were the people that we generally are helping a lot of businesses that are undergoing digital transformation, things like that where they really need to figure this stuff outso I mean, it was interesting because when it started, you know, no one knew how long it was gonna last, right? So we do a lot of in person training typically, and we offer publican person workshops ourselves and then a lot of our clients stuff is in person. And, you know, I do paid speaking. And that's all in person, of course. So right away we saw an impact. But it was tricky to say How long does this last and one of our big clients that does global trainings, like at a huge scale. We train their trainers ironically, um, they were like, we're virtualized. And can you trainer trainers on how to do good virtual workshops? And I thought, Man, if they're virtual izing everything and this was back in like February march, I'm like if their virtual izing, we got to get moving faster. So we virtualized all of our workshops pretty quickly and, you know, it's been very interesting because I mean, we also have traditional online learning, right? But I think some people will pay, sign up and learn at their own pace and take courses. Ah, lot of can't do it. They never get around to it. Um, you know, it's like we all. There's some study that says, like people only read like 20% of the books they buy. I'm for sure. Guilty. I'm looking at my bookshelf. I have 1000 books I've not read many, so it's the same with online training, right? And that's why the in person or live stuff works is because you put that time time aside. You can ask a person question. There's a little more accountability, and there is something to that two way dialogue, even virtual. So what surprised me the most is so we put our first we piloted so real quickly. We were like, Hey, who wants to come to a free content workshop? Who wants to come to a free strategy workshop so we could pilot and test and get data, and what we saw was, you know, our in person workshops for an average of four 0.8 out of five really high. We've perfected them for 10 years, like we know every detail. Here's how the tables face right, so with virtual after the first couple pilots scores Air Justus high learning experiences Justus. Good. If not better, because we're able to cool things like we do a ton of human. Any time with the instructors. We can do one on one sessions and you can say we structure it. So maybe you're doing B two b marketing and you're like, there is no scenario. I'm going to use Pinterest. I don't care. Pop out for that section and come back later. So I think in a lot of ways, because we were deliberate about it. But also because of some of the features of online, we've been able to provide a different experience and in some ways a better experience. But it takes this attitude of not just, you know, I think there's a certain amount of opportunism you see now with business owners where it's like, Oh, you know, I'm just going to start doing virtual, but we don't just do it. We measure it. We, you know, we investigate. We we all did our own training and research and, you know, it's the simple ideas, like somebody went to another workshop, someone on my team into another virtual workshop where during the breaks they would play music and just say when you hear the music stop. You know, get up when you hear the music stopped. That means we're going to start again. Simple, clever, easy to execute, Right? So all these little details we worked out and I think that's why they're really well received because we didn't just say we're gonna do virtual and try and do our classroom in that way.

How do you reach out to potential clients? What are the roles of people you reach out to? What are their typical concerns and how do you address them?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
Yeah, it's really interesting, actually, because we've built our business. You know, I mentioned at the beginning for myself. It was more inbound versus direct sales. And that's really how we built our business, right? Most we focus on S E o content exposure awareness, and we had a really steady flow of fleets from that. So, you know, there's a handful of clients that got in, like, big contracts with big fortune. Whatever companies, and I'm like, yeah, they found us through Google or I actually worked. I did a three year digital transformation project with the company in the Netherlands. I'm actually still based in the Netherlands now, because I came here to work with them, but I was like, How did you ever get a client like that? I'm like, yeah, they saw YouTube video. Believe it or not, um, and I was bad. I mean, so it's not just that I plant the seeds, but work extraordinarily deliberate with our follow up, right? If you're like, Hey, we need you here next week. Can you have a call tonight at two. AM? Fine. We can do that. You know, we will make sure we're first to respond to the plants. We turn around proposals in 24 hours. So are right is also really high because we focus again. It's all process eyes that I have a number of proposal 10 points. That usually takes 22 at most 40 minutes to customize the proposal. And it looks better than anyone else's. But we temperate ties and you know it took a week of refining it right. But it's that investment up front. So ah, lot of our businesses inbound in that respect. And now we're focusing a little more on outbound marketing. We have public courses, right? So anyone can come and take a course from us. And, um, you know, that continues to grow. And, of course, we run ads and things like that for that side of the business with the cork side, we are now focusing a little bit more on some of the key roles and decision makers, so you know, typically larger organizations. Often they're undergoing digital transformation. It could be someone in the digital team or a marketing director or, in HR training person. Sometimes agency is usually where we do well is the mid to large size agencies so maybe 50 people, 2000 or 2000. And, um so now we kind of know who they are. We're starting to do a better job of getting in front of them versus waiting for them. Decide they need training. But that's kind of how we approach things is Teoh. You know, I personally I'm not really comfortable with an aggressive sales approach, and I know plenty of people are successful with it. But for me, that's one of the benefits running my own company is. I don't feel like I need to do stuff that just doesn't match my style or how I would want to be treated, to be honest, Um, so we didn't do this super aggressive sale stuff, But we do try and get the message in front of people when they're making a decision and build awareness and credibility. So then when they find us, they think, yeah, this is who I need to work withwell, and I think the other consumer change you have like and this is one not a lot of people specifically talk about, but like people want to be. I think whether it's B two B or B two c, people wanna be more in control and they don't want you to sell to them in a direct and obvious way. So if I think about like, you know, if I'm buying custom swag, you know I'm gonna get boot camp digital T shirts or like actually this thing behind me, Right? So if I'm gonna get this made, I don't wanna feel it'll lead form. I do not want yourself person to contact me. Do you know I never I literally never answer my telephone ever, Ever. It's important you leave a message which I can read and text and send you an email and schedule a call. If we do need to talk, it's not like I don't want to talk to people. But come on So to me, like, why did I bought this through Vista print? But why? While they had good awareness, I know they're gonna be equality. It'll deliver on time, and I could go on their site completely. Design it, get the price, everything without having to talk to human beings. And, you know, we pride ourselves on touch, like in the sense like if you we have live chat, we will respond within 24 hours like we're super responsive if you want to talk to us. But what I see more and more is that's what people want. Like when I decide I want training. I want to go and research and get enough information and choose my top three companies and then I will call them. I will schedule the call, and I think if you look especially at people under a certain age, I don't know what age that is. They don't answer your phones like I'm not an anomaly and never answering my phone. Um, e think people don't want that so much anymore. So part of our job as marketers and communicators is to give people enough thio for them. Thio completely make that decision on their own, and you know we're there. I find their certain people who, like Thio, talk to a human even when they don't have real questions. You know, some of our products like our live training. It's 2500 bucks doesn't surprise me. Someone might just wanna have the confidence that someone is there before they buy that online. But, you know, for every five people who want to talk to somebody, there's 10 who see it. They get all the information online and then a decision. So I think a big part of it with Digital right now is really catering to the people who don't really want you in their face. They don't want, you know, like I have businesses that are like, How can I do text messaging? And you know, people don't want this, um, focus on delivering a great experience that they're open thio and signing up for And I think that wins you more over time is to self serve and product ties. So, you know, if I wanna hire I hired an email consultant recently, and I didn't have to have four conversation and he made a custom proposal. We had one call. He was smart. He knew how to fix the problems I had. He was like, Here's a package you could buy outline done. You know, the last time you feel last time. I know exactly what I'm getting perfect and that's even B two B's. So I do think it's changing with Digital in that way a lot where the winners are the people who make it easy for people who just do stuff on their own.

What are the roles of client's employees you routinely work with? What are the challenges in working with them? What approaches help to overcome challenges?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
I think when it comes thio the challenges that we have been working with, you know, we typically are serving business professionals, mostly marketers, sometimes sales teams as well, sometimes executives. But you know, even executives, it's about the marketing normally and communication. So what I find is we're at a point where we kind of have to extremes of people that you deal with. And they're both the hardest people in the middle who are like, I know a little, But I'm certainly not an expert. These air like your dream because they're open minded and they know enough to give you some direction about well, you know, based on where we spend, we need to know these four things, but they're actually the rarest. What I see a lot of right now is you see people who have no idea still, but they and they know they don't know. A lot of companies will say, Well, we need to improve our digital fluency, and I'm like, Okay, but how? But why? What? You're paying points and they struggle to articulate it a little because they don't really know what they don't know. Still, so I find one of the challenges with them is to understand their business enough to get to put them on the right track. So then we have to dig in and figure out okay, What is it people need to know to do their jobs, And then how do we get them that skill and knowledge? And then, on the other hand, you have people who think that they're amazing and they're tricky is to deal with eso. You know, I did a project recently where they said, Oh, we're so advanced. You know, we need your most advanced content And I said, It's great, you know? Let me take a look at what you're doing. And, like all the basics are out of order. You know, they're posting Facebook videos with the six second logo build on the beginning. And so I think also, there's a little bit of reality. Check involved where you may know these things. Like if I said well, how many seconds does somebody watch? They could say three seconds. Great. Well, why do you have a six second logo bill? The beginning. So it's not that they don't know what that you know, that that exists or they don't know that mobile is important. So I worked with the client and I said, Well, we need to talk about mobile optimization And they said, Oh, that's so basic. Everyone knows that. Okay, but nothing you do is mobile optimized. So do you want to do something that will grow your business and results, or because people note in their brain and aren't applying it? Do you want to not cover that right? And e a little nicer and more sensitive? But those air some of the conversations I find we have more and more where I think, especially with people who've done digital for a little while. They'll be real quick to say, Oh, I know this. I know this, I know this, but when you look at the application, it's not there and you know, we all have room to improve. And I think it's a bit of a mindset shift on learning and education because the goal in education for a business professional is not knowledge. It's application. If I know everything in the world that digital marketing, but it is not executed, what does it matter? Right, and so I think when we have people who know a lot. They're good to work with in a way because they have that foundation. But then you really have to focus on, you know, the application side of things, which is really, really important. And, like I've talked a little marketing for 15 years. When I teach a class, I have a to do list of 20 things I get a positive are oi in new ideas and improvements when I teach my own class, and so occasionally you get someone who's like, Well, I already knew this stuff. I didn't learn anything new and it's like you're not thinking because one, there's no way that's true, but to even if it's not new, surely if you're thinking you realize you're doing something wrong or you have an opportunity right and I can look at what you're doing and I guarantee you I could give anyone's had ideas in and out easily, right? So But it's more mindset, right, and I think that's not unique to digital. It's probably just a little bit of our in terms of the evolution of the space

What skills and qualities do you look for while hiring? What kind of questions do you typically ask from candidates?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
I was reading something today and somebody said This'll is not how I've done it but actually it would be the best. Well, it would be one of the factors it's called, something like two beers and a dog method, which is like when you guys would have two beers with this person and when you trust them to watch your dog. Um, and ah, large agency I had worked with many years ago that was actually one of their informal criterias was like, You know, you don't want everyone to be the same as you sow. So it's not about saying this, but is this someone you'd want to get to know better? Would you wanna go have a coffee with this person? And that was literally part of their hiring criteria? Was, would you wanna have a coffee with this person? Are they interesting? Are they likable? Um, and I think that's usually not on a formal thing like it was with this agency, but it is a factor. So, you know, for me, I look a little bit at the skills, but, you know, skills and experience s so it depends. There's two type of hires, right if I'm hiring trainers, we have a ton of contract trainers. I'm looking for one. The based skill. I need to look at some of their training videos. Check that they do a good job. They can communicate, what with clients. They come across well, and then they have the knowledge. I'll also look at the cell ability of their resume. So one of the challenges I often have is they're smart people who do a good job and are decent trainers. But they don't have the experience sort of resume where a client would necessarily accept them. So they're harder for up to place for certain clients because, you know, we have someone who's like, Well, I want someone who's worked with X type of business. Um, so when it comes to sort of are more skilled jobs, it really is about the skill and me. What I've learned over time is everyone will tell you they're great and everything, but I always look for send me some videos. I want to see it in action, or I'll have them during the interview. I'll be like, Okay, let's take ehskyoo, explain Spoto. So I want to see how do they think on their feet how they handle themselves in interviews. I'm very big on demonstrating the skills, not just talking about it, and then for so that's for, like, highly skilled or, you know, contract rules. Otherwise, what I'm looking for is, you know, everyone works remote, so I prefer people with experience working remote, which now is probably everyone. Um, I do think it's harder to manage your time and not everyone likes. I mean, no one's saying this now, but a ton of people don't like to work at home all day. Um, I always have co working spaces. I don't actually want to work in my house all day, and so we've been a remote company for over four years. So I look for people who have experience working remote. No, they want to be working at home and are gonna feel socially isolated. Um, that's like a deal breaker for me. And then and I think with this what's nice is with this current state, people are figuring out where they are on that scale, Like again. I say this. I don't like to work from home. I always have an office or coworking space because I just I do better that way. I need that separation a little bit. Um so for me, the next thing is a lot more about soft skills. Are they Good communicator. If somebody sends me an email with type is if their resume has any errors, it's like automatic disqualifier. I'm sorry, but if your resume is your best foot forward, it needs to be perfect. And I see that is a non perfectionist. You know, there's not I'm very like, Go fast. Everything is not perfect. Fine. But if you're best foot forward has missed aches, it speaks volumes. Um, so I look at, you know, attention to detail, things like that. And then we kind of Well, look at okay, what are the skills and how does that fit with what we have? But, you know, I really do believe that you can teach a lot of different skills. You can't teach worth that work ethic you can't teach. Are they get to work with? Are they curious? Are they detail oriented? Do they approach their work in the right way? And that's what I found. Every time is like the right people. I can teach them whatever I want them to know. So you know, unless it isn't a job that requires the experience. Experience is usually the last thing that I look at. I look at the people first.

Can you discuss career accomplishment(s) that you feel good about? Please discuss the problem context, your solution, and the impact you made.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
Yeah, sure. So I think, um, you know, when I started out and even now, right? Getting you know, good big clients that people have heard off is one of the is one of the big challenges. And it's important for a number of reasons, like one they're good clients may have money, right? So, yes, but two that's going to get you all your other big fish. Right? And I realized this early on. Um, you know, I was fortunate. I had, like, PNG was my first clients, right? So I had, like, big names, right? At the beginning, I worked with one of the big, the biggest global ad agencies. I did their first digital training 12 13 years ago, so I kind of had a little bit of it at the beginning. But it was really through these, like personal connections. And so, to me, when I started being able toe land, these big fish that found me, you know, because a lot of people like how do you get Nike as a client? How do you get Harley Davidson is a client. I'm like they found me like I didn't do anything. I wouldn't really know how to be honest to tell somebody else how to do it likes marketing. Right? Um, so that kind of from a problem standpoint, getting good big clients and then to me, I really think it's that outbound marketing. You plant the seeds and the right people will come. These people don't want to be sold that they don't want me sending them spam. You links in messages. Yeah, and incredibly credibility builds on itself, right? Like what I have noticed is, once you get one thing, it's so much easier to get 2nd, 3rd, 4th or fifth Once you get that one big clients, that's your proof point to get the next one. And, you know, we just last year started working with Facebook as a client of ours, which is huge, right? We're in digital marketing there, You know, arguably the second biggest digital company after Google. And, you know, we even trained their trainers, so that's huge, right? Um but it's through all these things. Had I not had that first big client, would they have been like, Oh, yeah. This is a real company we could see ourselves scaling with. And, you know, I was the same thing. I've written six books now, and it's interesting because people want to know. Well, how do you write a book? You literally just write one. It's extraordinarily easy to self published a book on Amazon. You could get a word template to write your book in. It's like It's so, so, so easy. It wasn't what I did it, but like now it's so, so, so easy to dio. But the thing of it, Waas like I wrote my first book, and it was because I had done training and I had written, like, 150 page manual. And my friend was like, Turn that into a book. Are you kidding? It would be so easy, like you've done the hardest part you have. Like if you did that in book pages, you have a 250 page book you've already written with graphics and all this stuff. So, like, that was how I wrote my first book and I self published when it was like a lot harder to do. But still anyone could do it. I just did it right, and then what was interesting was from there. I co authored a textbook. Well, they found me. They saw I had written a book before they, even though it self published, No one really cares, right? So they had seen I had written a book. They also had read some content. I wrote on strategy and thought it was, like, really well structured. So they asked if I would join a project to co author a textbook. Of course, I wrote. So I wrote the first book on Social Media Marketing, the first textbook on social media marketing. Then I had self published another book about visual, social media marketing. Well, I got an email from the dummies book people. They were like, We want to do something on visual content. We see you already wrote a book. Could you write Are Dummies book? Yeah, right. So I think also, if you think about what you want, just figure out how you get it done and it will build on itself. Had I started out saying, I need a book deal, I don't think I have written a book now, and so I think, like figuring out how to get that first bit of what you want. Even if it's not perfect, that's gonna snowball to get you more of what you want in the long run

How has the demand for certain skills and technologies changed in your field? What kind of consultancy work or jobs would see big growth in the upcoming years?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
there's a I mean, there's so much demand for everything. I kid you not right. It's like user design and user experiences growing big time. And Google just launched this certification program for them to compete with colleges. Right? Um, there's, you know, content marketing is huge. Creativity is big. So from a skill points, I think there's there's sort of two extremes that still have value, and the problem is people put themselves right in the middle. But what adds value is being super expert at one thing. And so, like this guy that I hired to fix my email, deliver ability, problems, that's all he does. And he is like the best. When I was like, Hey, I'm having this problem. Everyone's like Ask him, Ask him, Ask him and he is the best. And I'm gonna pay him or because he is the best of that one thing, right? So I think either really specialize and focus on being the best in one area because there's a lack of like, true expertise in a lot of these areas. So we still see a lack of tour expertise in S. E. O, for example, and S CEO has been shown to be one of the most in demand skills for marketers. It's been around forever. Everyone puts ASIO on their resume. Most people know nothing about it, really so. But if you were truly expert, it's super and demand. I'm in these groups ever retiring for S e o constantly. So choose one thing. Dedicate yourself toe expert level. Become very, very good at one thing, because there still are a lack of true specialists who really have taken the time to learn and grow and do a great job at something. The other area, I think where there's some some opportunity is the sort of higher level, like strategic thinking analysis side of things right where you can really come in at a higher level. So maybe it's people a little more senior in their career. But every marketing director job I have seen posted in the last two years is looking for people who also really no digital well and so I think, for any kind of ah seasoned person, you can't continue to skate along half knowing this stuff

Can you tell us something about your latest book, either published or upcoming? What is it about? Do you have any specific audience in your mind for it?

Based on experience at: Marketing Author, Wiley
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
So it's heard in six months. This is my last one, and it's actually like a little bit of a different topic. So this is launch yourself, and the focus is personal branding and how to build a strong personal brand online. And the reason I wrote this is like there's tons of people talking about personal branding, but it's like very tactical. Usually it's like, Oh, go on LinkedIn and blah, blah, blah right? But a brand starts with, like, What is it even that you want to communicate on LinkedIn? How do you want to appear? One of the things you'll notice about me is consistency. I look the same in this webinar, almost as on the back of my book. Look at that right, even branded background right? And embarrassingly, The picture on the book is almost 10 years old. I should update right, but I always look the same, right, and it's on purpose. It's branding so eso. Anyways. It's focuses on how to define design and deliver a powerful personal brand online, and what I like about it is that it really it comes with. I also made an action plan, which is like a template. And so you have all of the steps to think through. What am I? What are my biggest value propositions? How do I create a mission that makes other people wanna get behind me and help me and what I'm doing? And so I've seen this be incredibly powerful for people who implement it. So, um, this is probably the most exciting book for me. And it's the newest one that I wrote the book I wrote prior to that Hang on, I'm going to show you that one, too.other book that I just wrote last year, I think was digital marketing that actually works. And what's funny is I was doing something yesterday and, you know, look, when you write a book, the first thing you do is you get all your friends to leave positive. Amazon reviews. So the book looks like that, right? And I haven't gone to the Amazon page in a while and I was like, Oh, my gosh, like strangers have all left these glowing reviews S O That was super nice, because I feel like I certainly didn't do enough to promote either of these books when they came out. But what I like about this one is the problem I noticed is that we just lack this, like, based knowledge of like, what is the world of digital, and how do all the things work that I need to know about? So this book is not gonna let your pants on fire if you want to be the world's biggest expert on S e O. But if you're like, Look, I need to understand all this stuff, how does it strategically fit together? What works now? Like, What's the truth of what really will work now? Long term strategy, kind of stuff, not tactics. That's what this is. So what I found with all my clients was like, This is the exact workshop I was constantly doing, which is like, Here's all the stuff you need to know if you don't want to be done about digital marketing. And so that's what this book is. So those. No, I give you two, but the books that I think are, like, really impactful for people right now.

What were some of the major exciting and memorable moments as an author? Were there also any moments that almost got you to quit? How did you get past them?

Based on experience at: Marketing Author, Wiley
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
really, really good at writing books. That's something I've learned like I could have been a professional ghost writer, I think, Um, probably. But But here's the thing. Like I'm training and talking about these subjects constantly. So by the time I sit down to write a book, I know the outline. I know the key points. I have models and frameworks like if you look in any of my books, but you notices everything, has steps and is organized and frameworks and models, and that's all thought through before I ever right. So that's going to sit down and write like my hands just don't even type fast enough. I can get these words out like it's nobody's business, but I think the biggest. But again, the reason it works for me because I'm already training on these topics. So if I'm gonna train you on how to build a marketing strategy, I need a framework. I need steps. I need to say, Here's the way you do it in the order, and I've refined that over years. So when I go to write it down, yeah, easy peasy. So to me, the biggest thing if you want to write a book is to start with, like, What is the big idea? And then how do you break that all down into, like a continuous journey? So if you think of digital marketing that actually works, it's like here's the strategy stuff. Here's the tool to abuse, and here's how you measure. Launch yourself, define design, deliver and then so define. What is your brand Always design. How do you make it attractive to people deliver? How do you amplify it? So very simplistic. But then, within each of those, it's like the four things that make a powerful brand. In each of those has three and right. It's all this like organized thinking. So I think if you spend your time on that first when you actually are writing words, it's not as hard. And if you needed to, you could even have someone help you like you can hire a ghost writer if you have the ideas in the framework. But the ideas in the framework, I think, are the hardest part. Ah, lot of people sit down with the idea. I want to write a book and they just start writing. I started with I want to teach people this exact thing. Um, I figured out how to teach it to them, and then I turned it into a book. So for me, that's what works. And, um, makes it easy. And so yeah, I don't think I had many points when I was gonna, you know, quit. But I will say, you know, some of the rewarding things when I've written it. Waas um I remember this was years and years ago, probably 89 years ago. I was doing a keynote presentation in Canada at this, like in Calgary, like in the mountains, whatever. And eso I was My mom came because we were going to dio like, a week traveling. And so I was like, Well, can you help me? Because I'm gonna do this presentation and after results, all books. And it would be great if you could just run the credit cards and she's like, yeah, fine. And it was so funny because she was like, Oh, my gosh, you're like a celebrity on the presentation and there's a line of, like, 70 people. I had no books left at the end, and so that was like, really impactful, you know, just because you forget and you get so caught up in just doing doing doing it's like, yeah, you know, people care. They do like this. It's important. It's helping them and s o that. And then you know the small thing. It's like, honestly, when somebody says like I read this and it was helpful like these Amazon reviews I happened upon yesterday, literally, that's gonna make my day for, like, weeks and not because I want positive refused to some more books, but because I create books that I think will help people right, like at this point, I've written them. I don't do it to, like, say, I wrote a book. It's because I'm like, I have this information that I know could help people to do something better. And when you hear that, yeah, it does, in fact do that. To me, that's incredibly rewarding because you know, you don't read a book to be rich, that's for sure. Eso eso That's what's been impactful for me. Yeah, right. I mean, but yeah, I could go either way, right for everyone of her. There's like a money and like people who know nothing, right, and I often get authors who are like, Hey, I need help marketing my book And what I always said from the beginning is I said, Oh, that when people would ask me how I market my own books I said, Oh, it's funny You think I exist to market a $10 book? The book is just market me Alright, right?

How did the school prepare you for your career? Think about faculty, resources, alumni, exposure & networking. What were the best parts?

Based on experience at: BBA, Business, Wilfrid Laurier University
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
Yeah. I mean I mean, for me The biggest thing Waas It got me my first shop. Like so. I mean, I'm Canadian, but I left Canada in 2000 and five. Now I'm in the Netherlands. So, like, I haven't maintained a lot of those connections. But the biggest thing, actually that I was set up for WAAS. I went to a business school that had, ah, Coop program, like an internship program in order to graduate. If you got accepted into the program, they would help you get a job and you need a three of them and that hands down probably set my career off faster than 90% of people. And I'm still surprised. You know, I hired college thio have in the past, not recently, but I used to hire college students all the time, and I was constantly amazed, like none of them have any real experience. And it's not that hard to get, you know, maybe you're working for free, even, but still, it's better than doing nothing. And I think you know, to me the college program I was in made sure we had good work experiences. I did a co op at Hewlett Packard. I did wanna Procter and Gamble, and I did one overseas in Scotland at the university, and that probably was the biggest thing that then, you know, when I was interviewing for jobs, I was much better positions than a lot of my peers just because of the work experience. And I think employers perceived than you also are walking with a certain amount of maturity and and correct expectations. So I think you know education. Yeah, you learn stuff, but it's not like I'm like pulling out a finance book to do anything right. So the knowledge is like, vaguely useful here and there. But to me it's more you learn how to work with other people. You learn how to meet deadlines. But the co ops, I think we're the biggest thing. And having a college or university that helped to make sure I had those experiences Hands down. Biggest biggest benefit

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? Please discuss the stories behind these lessons, if possible. Stories could be yours or observed.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Tue Sep 15 2020
So the first one for me, which is my big obsession these days, is think impact on. That's what we say a big digital. That's what we say to our clients. I started using the word impact a lot, and the reason is that I looked at what I'm spending my time on. Right. How impactful is a lot of it doesn't matter what would happen if I didn't do it and I had to learn this all the hard way, you know, like it's not like I was so smart to realize, like, oh, half of this stuff I don't even need to do. No one needs to dio, you know, it's like I think the first time honestly was when I went on a maternity leave and I like I literally couldn't do it. A ton of stuff just didn't get done. And you know what? Most of it didn't matter. You know, the idea of the four hour work week isn't really that you can run a business on four hours. In my opinion, it's probably what you spend 20 hours on isn't even important. But we think it issue no, and I look at even just like my latest example that I love to use is how I handle linked in Right. Okay, so I'm huge on then. I love it, but I'm fairly public. I have a lot of connections. I want to accept any real person who wants to connect with me. There's a ton of spammers, right? So when I goto linked in, I spent 90% of my time, though. Who? My name high over these people who are probably spammers and don't even know me and don't care. And it doesn't matter if I accept them or not. I spent 10% of my time thinking about the good quality connections and how to follow up on them right where my time going versus where the impact is thes families. I just need a rule. Either reject or accept. It doesn't even matter what I choose, but I need to not suck all my time into the thing that has no real value. And I need to take that time and get more value where the value already exists. So to me, the big thing is focused on impact, and that's what we see a lot when we consult with companies is like It's not like they're doing totally stupid things anymore. But you know, of all the things you could Dio, if your goal is to get 10% in sales growth, you're spending 70% of your effort on a chat pot. That best case scenario is gonna bring you 10% like it just doesn't match up. So anyway, impact is my big thing. How impactful is this And using that as like my guide of what I work on and what we work on with our clients, the S O, that would probably be the first one. The second one is investing in better work habits or education or whatever else, right? Like having this investment mindset because even if I think about, you know, I mentioned are templates that we use for proposals there 10 times better in the long run, we spend a lot less time on proposals. But that first year we probably spent twice as much because we created really, really amazing templates. And I think a lot of us in our careers don't invest enough whether it's getting a certification getting experience like, how did I leave a Fortune 500 by the way, I worked in finance at Procter and Gamble. I was not in marketing. How did I switch careers? Well, I didn't just look up one day and be like I want to switch careers. Why won't anyone hire me? No, I worked part time for free at an Internet startup. Evenings and weekends. That's how I'd happened. I volunteered on a committee at the American Marketing Association like it's not magical, right? So But it's an investment where I can have some vague idea of where I might wanna be and figure out this is gonna position me well. And sometimes I do things that aren't necessary. Like I have a CF A, which is like a fancy finance designation I will never use. But it's certainly, you know, whatever. So I wasted some time of my life taking these stupid hard test, but I could have positioned me well and actually, people who know what it is our impressed. So I get some value, um, s O but don't be afraid to invest in yourself. I think is the other big thing. And then the third thing, which arguably I can even improve on, is it all comes financial relationships, and I think it's relationships with your employees. Like, you know, to me. I had a very honest conversation with someone who works for me the other day where I'm like, you know, what's going on and I wasn't getting clear answer. And it's like she's personal stuff. That's fine. Like, we need to have a relationship where you can tell me, because otherwise I'm like, Do you not know how to do this task? Are you not working? Are right. If you have a relationship of trust that helps your employees, that helps your customers. You know, our customers know, were straightforward with, um they're not worried about it. Relationships that I've had in the industry have gotten me a ton of my clients and then also the relationships with, like my family, my friends. I prioritize that. You know, there's chunks of time when, yeah, I'm not going to be working at all. And don't call me on gall of There's a relationships and to me, I think a lot of us don't think in that term because I think we're too self centered sometimes about we think, you know, it's only what you do that matters. But, um yeah, those would be my everything