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How did you get to where you are today? What is your story? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
I started my career in business development at the Global Association of Risk Professionals. I actually got that job by accident because I graduated with a finance degree in 2009, when the financial crisis was in full swing and people weren't really hiring, especially banks. There was a hiring freeze, so I started going out and networking and I ended up at this Global Association of Risk Professionals event where I met a Managing Director and we just have started talking, and I basically let him know that I was actively searching for a job, and the next day he something email asking me for my resume. I came in for an interview a few days after that and was hired as a business development associate, that entailed me going out, to Chief Risk Officers and heads of risk management and training at different banks to talk to them about how they can use GARP, which is the global association risk professionals training in in their institutions. I met the Chief Risk officer of bank leumi, who actually told me a few weeks after that that he was looking to hire somebody as a risk analyst reporting directly to him. I obviously went in and went for the interview. I did not think I would get it. It required about seven years of experience, which I did not have a point at that time. But I took a chance. And about a year into that role, I was contacted by the Lloyd to come in for an interview in their advisory consulting practice. Again, I did not think I would get that position. I only had about two years of total work experience if we're not counting internships or the the side jobs that I held throughout school. But I decided to go in for the interview and they ended up getting that jobs. That's kind of what led me here. I've been with the Lloyd for about seven and a half years now.

What are the responsibilities and decisions that you handle at work? What are your working hours like?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
Responsibilities and decisions that I handle at work now at Deloitte involved working with a lot of data. So we work with data in terms of our expenses, hours that are charged by individuals. We look at all the reports around revenue and wins, the pipeline, and they basically gather executive dashboard using Tableau to put them together and in front of executives that help them make their decisions. The working hours for me now are, it's a pretty much nine to five where prior to this role, when I was in client service, I think they worked around the clock. I basically worked nights, weekends and traveled. But then I had kids, and I decided that, you know, I didn't want to miss their especially their young years. So i decided to take on this internal role that allows me to work from home and work nine to five.

What tools (software programs, frameworks, models, algorithms, languages) do you use at work? Do you prefer certain tools more than the others? Why?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
So I used Tableau software pretty heavily at work, and I do prefer it over other tools because it provides me with the flexibility to do whatever I need to do so I am able to match together different data sources into one. It speeds up the time, for example, instead of using excel to do v-look up, I can quickly do that in tableau, the data doesn't blow forever and crash, so that's another added benefit. But it also allows me the flexibility to create the technical dashboards and the look and feel that I want and be able to customize it for for the executives and then have the ability to drill down and filter on specific things for different members of the executive team or the teams that support them. So it's been really good for me.

What things do you like about your job? Were there any pleasant surprises?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
The thing I like most about my current job is the flexibility, that I have to kind of run the day, my day, the way I want to run it. Obviously there're things that just need to get done. But I think my favorite part is my team and manager. We get along really well, and we work together really well, even though we probably only seen each other in person three or four times since we started working together about a year and a half ago. And i think that makes all the difference, the flexibility to work on what I feel like working on in the moment without somebody hounding me and standing behind my desk and telling me what to do.

What are the job titles of people you routinely work with? What strategies or approaches did you find to be effective in working with them?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
I work with senior managers, program managers and some data scientists, and I think in terms of how to work effectively with different types of people. I think titles mean, don't mean as much as people give them value. I think you really have to focus on the individual and their personality, and how did they like to collaborate or work on things. So I think you have to adjust the way you deliver your communication or the way you work together based on that person's personality.

What major challenges do you face in your job? Can you discuss a few accomplishments, and challenges that you overcame and felt proud of?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
I think one specific challenge I like to note is the fact that we're working with so much data, and I think it takes time to understand how all that data connects to each other, how everything speaks to each other. And I think that was the biggest challenge, especially early on is just learning about how things work and then optimizing them, so they work well together in the future in a more efficient way than they were working when I just started.

What was the hiring process like for your job? What were the roles of people who interviewed you? What questions were asked and how did you answer them?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
So I was hired into the Lloyd about seven and a half years ago, and it wasn't to a risk management position. It wasn't the data scientists or data visualization specialist, which I focus on more now. I was interviewed by senior managers, partners and managing directors. I think there were four people in total that interviewed me after I got through the recruiter screening. I clearly remember standing outside because, you know, you don't take a phone interview at your desk. You go outside of your office. I was standing outside and speaking to a recruiter, and he was basically trying to talk me out of the job. He said, you know, there's going to be heavy travel, you know, look, at least eighty percent of your day you will be spending potentially in another state and it's going to be hectic and long hours. And he basically warned me for what was to come in client service, which is what you can expect it. It's not guaranteed that you'll have to travel, but I think it was good that he brought light to that. So I wasn't going into something and then expecting a nine to five, so that was helpful. And then when I finally got into the office for the follow up interview after their recruiter screening, I was asked several questions about my knowledge and risk management, what kind of projects I did at Bank Leumi for the Chief Risk Officer, why I wanted to work for the Lloyd? There was one question in particular I Remember, a partner was asking me, it was something to do with operational risk with a foreign company and a subsidiary company of the US, and the parent company in a foreign country. And he kept asking me questions about potential risks, and I would give them an answer. Then he asked me again the same question, worded the same way, so I give him a slightly different answer. I think he asked me that same question about five, six times until he finally heard what he wanted to hear. Or maybe it was a test to see if I lose my mind at the end of it, because it's a little unnerving when the interviewer would ask you the same question over and over again. I kind of wanted to get up and leave, but I'm glad I didn't.

What qualities does your team look for while hiring? How does your team interview candidates?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
I think they look for qualification, such as no prior consulting experience, working well and the team and also being a self starter. So I think they want people to wait to be told what to do there, looking for more of the go getters, who won't just sit all day until they're asked to do something. Go reach out and say, hey, how can I help you, you know, just be more proactive.

What are some future career path(s) for you? What skills, certificates, or experiences do you plan on acquiring?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
Deep learning, Artificial Intelligence. I am consistently learning everyday and learning how to program because I typically just used Tableau for my data analysis. But I'm learning Python right now and taking some machine learning courses.

What are various starting positions and salaries in your domain? What are typical career paths after these starting positions?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
So most people start out as consultants unless they have enough experience outside of consulting. They could start off as a senior consultant, or manager, I guess it depends on their level of experience. And in terms of salaries, there's a huge range. I mean, I would say a starting probably could go somewhere between forty to seventy five thousand dollars, and that's just the range, I guess you could find with Google.

What were the responsibilities and decisions that you handled at work? What were your working hours like?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Risk Analyst for Chief Risk Officer, Bank Leumi USA
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
I worked as a risk analyst for the Chief Risk Officer of Bank Leumi. I was in charge of doing whatever came to the chief risk officer's plate. So if there was a regulation that came out and he was told by the legal or complaints department to look into it and you know match applicability of the regulation to various parts of the business, then he would send it off to me and I will take the first stab at it and then go over it with him and see where I can improve. I was lucky enough that I was given a lot of responsibility in the sense where projects would come straight to me without much instruction. Obviously, he was always there to support me when I needed help or have questions. But I was able to kind of brainstorming, be creative about how I address the requests. The working hours there were pretty much nine to five

What tools (software programs, frameworks, models, algorithms, languages) did you use at work? Did you prefer certain tools more than the others? Why?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Risk Analyst for Chief Risk Officer, Bank Leumi USA
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
At Leumi, we didn't really use many tools. We had some internally built tools for tracking and managing operational risk. And we had some tools for credit risk management. But I mainly worked in excel power, foy and word was very, very basic.***

What was the hiring process like for your job? What were the roles of people who interviewed you? What questions were asked and how did you answer them?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : Risk Analyst for Chief Risk Officer, Bank Leumi USA
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
First part here, it started out with the human resources lady and asked me why I want this job and kind of how I qualified for the position and to be honest, I didn't really feel like I was that qualified for that position, but I know I told her that I have this really big interest in risk management and I wanted to learn more and I am a go-getter and I work hard, so she passed me on along to the chief risk officer. Then he interviewed me. He asked questions again about my ability to get up to speed and you know working as an individual. And then I also interviewed with the head of operational risk and head of credit risk where the head of operational risk asked me questions such as can you define operational risk and the head of credit risk was a little bit more casual. He asked me what kind of books that I like to read and what I do for fun. I guess he wanted to see if I could fit well into their team.

What prompted you to pick this program? What other programs or Universities did you consider? What did you like about the program?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : BS, Finance & Investments, Baruch College
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
So I decided to go to Baruch and study finance, I guess, because my brother was studying accounting. I actually joined Baruch under the intention to major in accounting. But then I took a couple of courses and I didn't like it as much. I liked the managerial accounting, but the financial accounting was bit boring for me. So I decided to just switch to finance, which I thought was really exciting. Up until the time of the financial crisis which really impacted hiring abilities in the finance sector and several of my friends and, you know, a student there with the school with, they all switch their majors. You know, they went to marketing, they went. It's a very different field and I decided, you know, everybody else is leaving, someone is still going to need a finance major. So let me be the only finance major. I thought it would help me stand out a little bit and I don't have any regrets.

How did the program prepare you for your career? (This may include courses, advising, career resources, career events, class visits, networking and so on).

Asked by Jeff Musk

Kate Strachnyi ♕

Program Manager | Data Analytics, Advisory
Finance & Investments, BS, Baruch College
New York, New York
for : BS, Finance & Investments, Baruch College
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Thu Dec 06 2018
I think mainly what my undergrad degree prepared me for was it helped me learn how to learn if that makes sense. So being able to work under pressure. And I took six courses at some point, with an internship, with a job, and I was able to manage it all. And I think that prepared me for real life scenarios. Baruch also offered several resume courses, and there were networking events and some career events. So that helped me. Actually, I spoke to the Global Association of Risk Professionals. That's how I found out that they have events. So I guess it didn really help because that's where I met somebody who invited me to go to one of their events, which, like I mentioned in the previous question, actually led to an opportunity from a person I met at the event.

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