Temple University Ph.D., Business Administration with specialization in Management Information Systems
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Where are you originally from? Have you lived in other places? What kind of things do you enjoy (eg sports, dance, music, food, art, movies, reading etc)?

Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Mon Mar 26 2018
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What do students learn in your bachelor program, and jobs students get afterwards? Please also discuss about your graduate program(s), if you offer any.

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
I will elaborate on this a little more with some of the later questions but I teach at IT risk management and that's part of our MBA program. We also have a masters information technology program which has science in there and there's cybersecurity concentration program, we also have projects related to data analytics so we have a traditional MBA and also the managers ofIT program. I will tell you that our students do well in the job market. There's a lot of banks looking with Wilmington, Delaware, area. A lot of companies just on our way to Delaware because of tax laws but we do have a lot of our students work for JP Morgan, Bank of America, companies such as those. That's a little bit about our programs and also where our students end upworking.  

How would you encourage students to apply to your programs? Would you like to clear any misconceptions that discourage certain students from applying to your programs?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
We put an emphasis on trying to differentiate are program from some of the nearby programs. It's a pretty competitive area around here in the Philadelphia region. Many schools, their graduate and undergraduate programs so one of our distinguishing factors are experiential focus and the ability to work closely with firms, we have a great relationship with firms and some of the firms in the Wilmington area. They're heavily involved in our program's way. We have experiential programs where students are feeders to companies like JP morgan chase and other credit card companies and they work on things such as trying to detect fraud, working on various databases that are useful to the company. So I would encourage students to really read up about our programs and see that the experiential factor is something really interesting. I would say it's more of a hands-on the program as opposed to some of the other ones in our region in terms of any misconceptions about potentially discouraging students from applying. I particular I can tell you that our business school overall and then also within our programs, we have a huge emphasis on really encouraging females and more female representation in information technology programs. We want to program the woman's leadership forum where we have monthly gatherings where executives from the campus share their experiences and some of the challenges they face and I think the feedback we've gotten from some of the students, not just female students, It's very encouraging. Collaborative environment or students who may be typical would not have thought about perhaps a career in information technology.  

What are your research interests? Can you discuss major research projects you have worked on?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
I would say my general area now is called Cyber Security, back when I started, it was referred to as information security. Cybersecurity is now determined and that's kind of a blanket area but pretty much everything I've done and I finished my Ph.D. in 2005 so in my 12-13 year career I've been working in that research space for the most part. A huge emphasis of my research is being on the human side of cybersecurity trying to understand some of the individual and effectual factors in the workplace that lead to misuse of information systems, employee's misuse of the information in the workplace. So from the major projects I've worked on have been organizational deterrence due to information technology policy violations, when I say deterrence, it means countermeasures but more of security policies or technical countermeasures such as access controls and what intentions did they have been possibly carrying inappropriate use of information technology. Well, if you're trying to understand how we can better when it comes to information systems in a way that is pro security. More recently some of my work in cybersecurity I have been looking at some of the organizational level factors that decked and contribute to data pursuit information on data breaches are readily available whereas it wasn't in the beginning. 

How did you come across these ideas? How did you decide that these projects would be worth pursuing?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
 At the outset, I'll tell you how it all started, how I became involved in the area of cybersecurity so when I was in Ph.D. at TempleUniversity, my first faculty member that I was assigned to as a research assistant. He was working in cybersecurity, he was interested in trying to understand the impact of the data and security breaches on stock prices of firms. When we conducted a few initial events which affected companies. So I initially started reading up in the literature in this area in cybersecurity and from that as I get a knowledge base, I was like, I would like to stay in this area since I put the foundational work into It and I would also say there's a little bit of luck involved that it becomes kind of a hot area or time. The area of cybersecurity both in the respect of industry and academia. I got a little luck in that area just because my advisor at the time, I more or less stuck with it. In terms of coming up with specific research project research ideas. I'll tell you in my career, I read a lot, I read the literature it a lot and it really helps me understand the area of research.  

What criteria do you use to evaluate papers while reviewing? What are common reasons for papers getting rejected? How can authors improve the chance of getting their papers accepted?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
This is a good question because I feel like I have some experience to talk about this, not just from a reviewing aspect and the last 13 months, could be 14 or 15, I've been resorting squarely, but now I have the associate editor angle spell, the common one sort of blanket answer but lack of novel contribution. That's what you .now when I say that in terms of common reason that rejection, I'm talking about the threshold for getting into our top positions. Certainly good research that what happened absolutely novel that I could find a quality outlet in terms of getting into top journals there has to be a way here but a significant contribution to knowledge beyond ours. For example, adding one variable to a well known theory, your model probably will just. In terms of the common region, we're getting rejected, lack of the rapid contribution. You're applying it, what you smell, context and not really conceptualized. There is a phenomenon that's beating study would be a calm and reasoned, and then there's methodological reasons, I think for me, I asked where methodological threshold published, mythological rigor least surveyed you conducted at this point in time where all your are the data for those are contained in a single respondedbut it's not collen. That's often times methodologically there. But I just contribute the combination of methodological non rigor and not since financial right up front but I'll tell also students watching this thought of theoretical contribution. I feel like all these years you starting to really understand, and it's taken a lot of regents on my own work and what's the level of contribution, by that, I mean theoretical contribution . It's something that takes some time to learn. It wouldn't hurt meeting your neighbors, and every time you get a rejection is thinking about it and correcting yourself.     

What are some major research gaps that you believe needed to be addressed?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
I say it in a general sense, there's a lot more data available now than there was even five years ago, just in general, we know ofthe Internet of things, just all this data that is available and I think research gap or research opportunity would be finding ways to harness all of this data to make better decisions. I'll give you an exmple in the context of cybersecurity organizations in our collecting so much data on their network infrastructure on the types of packets that are hitting their network to types of activity that you're dealing with on their networks, they have this data and all these more advanced piece of hardware and software. How are they utilizing that To make better decisions to ultimately improve their information security? I don't think that's been addressed adequately yet, I think a lot of times organization put these tools in place because there's institutional pressure to do so but I don't think all the data that is available has been harnessed properly like I was saying before as well, the publicly available data on companies that have data breaches, how many records were put up for the company potentially affected, what types of organizations, what industries can we use that data to help, perhaps, board some of these bridges in the future. So at the general feed, making better use of the data that's out there. I think it is a gap in our field in general and an opportunity.  

What approaches have you found to be effective in working with various grant making agencies? What common mistakes researchers do while applying for grants and funding?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
I have some success in work in the industry slash academia collaborations and with any type of relationship, it took a while. There had to be trust as I think most of us that work in business school, we have some type of advisory board in our institutions. I was active in attending some of those meetings, getting to know some of those folks and just talking to him andtry and say okay, what are some of the questions that you guys like to answer, if you had some researchers at your disposal and people that were skilled in analyzing data, conducting studies, what types of things might you want answers to be helpful so I took some time, actually a lot of times established relationships and in a couple of successful nevers I've had in this regard, they came as a function of those relationships and then in terms of also being effective after the fact I was, I also provided those organizations with some type of deliverable so I didn't just see they're helping that work on a project and publish it in academic journal. I would write them a white paper. I would give them some type of comparative analysis of the particular project, how they might be doing as compared to some other folks and at the same time maintaining confidentiality to the organizations involved. So two things we're sort of summing up the answer to that question, establishing a relationship that involves a lot of work into it and then also providing something really important and not Can I just go, I think that goes a long way.  

What approaches have you found to be effective in working with industry for funding, getting data, and picking consultancy projects?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
 I remember my own experience. It took me about a good year so really holding in on the research topic. I remember going to my advisor over and over again and he was like I'm not sure if that one's too interesting so keep working at it. If there's an opportunity just to sit down and talk with some industry folks, I think they understand where are the trends and some of the things that our industry is concerned with. Obviously you've read the literature with the academic literature trying to come with research topics but academic literature typically lags behind what's happening in practice. But I would say won't lie on that bar. I would imagine most opportunities in seminars and talks with some CEOs and business folks that are truly attached to the institution. I recommend taking advantage of that. You just talk to them and try to understand the other thing. I have seen it also make yourself visible and get every bite. Any conferences in front of your scholars present your papers. Those are the folks who want to get your name out there looking at it out more. I want to be competitive. Hey, yet at that point you have a better view warning those who you are.

What advice would you give to PhD students, particularly who are searching for dissertation topic, and who are looking to enter the job market?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Mon Mar 26 2018
I did it and yet you have an interview and she already knows you are I think you may have a leg up on a petition sure really fought over my career and the gamut in houses nine throughout the night worse is if you're not working and now that I would say that the next five to seven years all your information slashed my wrists thank you masters level question I keep I also can there's networking undergraduate level like all the information security management is a survey course what we think of the technical issues not technical at all it might be possible I definitely which the wrong actor started out I was watching like you can have all right when I was a why early years of my career I think they're approaches that are more effective everything else might he watched me possible I try to look at so they will do an exercise where I will work on Michel Martin

What courses do you teach? How has your teaching philosophy changed over the years?

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
I really thought over my career is the gamut of MIS versus system analysis design some introductory IT courses, computer networking. Now I'll say that they 5 to 7 years of my career are nearly focused on information security/ cybersecurity courses. So I also teach a Master's level course on computer networking. At the undergraduate level I teach information security management, but it is kind of a survey course in the area of the information system, and it covers anything of the technical issues, nontechnical management in information security. In terms of my teaching philosophy when I first started out. I was watching action based on what I will understand when I was an undergraduate and I didn't realize, two years into my career I think there are approaches that are more expected. I would say that my teaching philosophy It's been possible. I always try to let students teach themselves. For example, I'll do an exercise where I will work on practical tracking that's my goal working on different aspects in a course. Whereas before I may have just my lectures, were presented the whole lecture on the topics and then got into the lab exercise. I'll do the lab exercise first now, let the students come up with questions on their own and I didn't need to supplement that. I really moved away from the traditional lecture to teach students now it's different. I would say I don't like problem-based learning but in general, I am not as structured in my teaching. I feel like I have a result of what I want to be achieved in the class. The students learn the concepts and then I say Hey here's some extra reading if you want to know more details just giving my lecture on that material. That being said, there's a lot of preparation going into that recently that. It includes the resources that they need to tackle problems. That's how I switched from pure lecture based to more of a hybrid.

What are some of the memorable things that students said or wrote to you? Feel free to share stories behind these notes.

Based on experience at: Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at University of Delaware
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Wed Apr 15 2020
I wouldn't say I have anything crazy or a crazy story. In general, I have had a lot of students come up with me over the years and say I chose a career in information technology not specifically information security or cybersecurity because of your class, and that's always very rewarding. When you have a student in the class and like many other people are not quite sure what they are pursuing a career. If you would help, you give them something they come out fantastic. They know what they want to do with their career, at least initially how to start their career. So that's probably not a bit the notion of a story but in terms of memorable things and experience over the years, you helped me find what I want to do with my education and how I want to apply it for later, that's very good. I think the best of my liability is something I tried to do with topics and make them interesting.