NYU Stern School of Business , Majors: International Business/Marketing; Minors: Judaic Studies/Spanish
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How did you get to where you are today? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path? What inspired you to work on this startup idea?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
Well, I went to N Y u Stern business school. I studied marketing, but I ultimately went into finance. And we can talk more about that in the switch, eh? So I started my career investing, thinking of Bear Stearns. Um, I wanted to kind of do the most boot camp intensive thing. Thio kind of challenge myself. Eso I heard that a lot of kids were afraid of investment banking, and I was like, Oh, what's that? I want to get that, um, after finance. Um, you know, 2000 and eight. Kind of a world history turning point when the iPhone was invented. And I you know, I felt like it was just a great use case to be ableto just with the click of a button on your phone. Uh, well, there were no more buttons, but just just a little tap for the taxi or car to come to you. Um and so I actually got a taxi license in New York City taxi license in 2009. While I was just kind of thinking about this idea, um, and uber and a bunch of companies kind of started all around the same time. Um, it's a very interesting story. How I actually got the job

What was the elevator pitch of your startup? What problem did it solve? How were your customers solving their pain point before your startup?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
New York City There about 13,000 yellow taxis. Um, you know, if anyone who left their back in the day, you know, 10 years ago, way before co vid Bye now, when streets were busy in terms of traffic, it was impossible to get a taxi certain times of the day and in certain areas of the city, um, and livery cars were not allowed to pick up in New York in Manhattan, and the black cars are mostly for corporate, So it was a huge pain point. If you need to get somewhere across town, you know that the subway is like, exactly, you know, 25 minutes to get there If you were to take a taxi, if you've got a taxi, you could take you 10 minutes, but it could take you, you know, 25 minutes to get a taxi. So the pain point and then was very clear. And that's why around the same time, there were a bunch of, you know, right hailing, um, companies that all start at the same time. Eso we did. We designed the products I launched get for New York. It was the international startup that had started in Israel in London already. Uhm, And the early users, you know, it was, um it was a time when, you know, with the iPhone there are lots of abs. People were, you know, experimental with things. Eso is easy to get people to just download and give it a try. Um

Can you walk us through your first few weeks when you started working on this project? How did things change over the next few months?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
Yeah. So? So the story of how I got the job. Um So, like, I was saying I had the idea for myself, but, you know, I come from finance. I wasn't quite ready. Thio jump into starting my own company. I don't know how to fundraise. I didn't know, You know, if I could find my own developers and get it, um, get it going. So I contacted the founder of Get Just With a Cold email on LinkedIn, um, contact at the same time Travis from uber and obviously just hired a GM for New York on dshea. How? Who's the founder of get, um they were in different countries, but not in us. Yeah, and I just kind of gave him the plan of what I wanted to do in New York and how we would attack on New York City. Um, And then if you hadn't hired anyway in New York yet, I would be the perfect person. So the first few weeks we were focused on defining, you know, the market and whether the M v p andi, even though in some other countries way, allow users to make a reservation on. We have to be to be, we decided for New York City, you have to just start the simplest M A. P is simply just having a map, being able to see the car where it is on the map and given e. T. A based on where you are and where the car is, how many minutes and then just have a smooth experience of being able to, you know, order a ride and have the car come to you. And then when you finish your right just paid seamlessly cash Leslie. So the first few weeks is, you know, building out the requirements for the APP as well as hiring some drivers in order to do, you know, a beta test. Oh!

What were the challenges in building the initial team and how did you overcome them? How did the team's composition, dynamics, time, and resource commitment evolve?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
I would say, because of the marketplace, um, the hardest, hardest Really building that both the demand and the supply the same time. Um, you know, for for staff, you know, it was, um e was so not as hard as finding the drivers, you know, posting the jobs, interviewing people from competitive. You know, companies who are people come from the car industry. Who really understood how to work with the drivers, knowing that we really needed to speak the drivers language, getting the drivers. I think it's kind of the bigger challenge. Uber had way more money, and so they were able to just pay a huge sign on bonus and just give every driver $500 cash to drive for uber. We didn't have the $500 multiplied by thousands of drivers on DSO. We partner with some of the local companies. Um, you know, we would go to the neighborhoods where their drivers, you know, hang out. They always eat at the same restaurants, you know, um and so I think finding on boarding the drivers and getting their commitment. It was much harder. And you just had Thio have a genuine pitch that we're with them and for them and not against them.

How did your venture get its first professional funding? What were the challenges and how were they overcome? How'd your fundraising efforts change in subsequent rounds?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
joint Where a series A. So the founder, the global founder had already raised initial VC money for the seed round a series. A Azzawi got bigger. You know, we were, um, kind of just on boarding larger VCs and investors, Um, and some and later on some quote equity, I think now total they've raised 800 million or something. Ondas we got bigger. Volkswagen became an investor as a kind of a corporate partner. Um, because as time went on, more and more car companies wanted to be in the mobility business. Um, you know, whether to sink a with their own cars or just, you know, toe have skin in the game. In case in the future, all car ownership goes away and all people want to do it. Just order car on demand. You know, that's where the world was going for years ago.

What major challenges did your venture face in scaling operations? How did you overcome those challenges?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
So for a marketplace, I would say, you know, the biggest challenges matching or supply and demand right if you had demand. But you didn't have the supply like, you know, at on Sunday mornings. If we didn't have the drivers on the road and you wanted to get a car Sunday morning and you can get a car, then that's a bad experience. Um, I would say that's definitely the biggest challenge of, you know, having them match. If you had too many drivers and not enough demand, then the drivers feel like they're not being paid enough, and then then they're going to jump to the company that pays them more for our, um, and really, I think there was the best way to solve. I mean, the more money you have, Fitz's easier to solve problems. You know, if you were to just be able to pay a certain number of drivers a fixed amount so that they have predictable income and happen, position them in certain parts of the city so that you always have a car available in this part of the city at any given time. Um, you know that that was really the only way Thio try to match the climb Demand Otherwise, you just try to grow supply and demand as fast as you as you can. And, um, to bump up demands. If you have the drivers, you know you can give a certain coupon or incentive like you know, on this day when we know demand is usually lower, you know, get 10% off on your ride or get a $5 coupon. You know, Onley on this day during this time.

How did you set the scope for your minimal viable product? How did you get to product-market fit? How did your product evolve over time?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
So, like I was saying earlier in the beginning, we did on demand only, um, on, Really? For for the whole time that uber operated in New York. It was for it would speak to see and on demand only. And we kind of differentiated, um, after a little while, by offering, you know, pre booking, like pre booking to the airport so that you always know for your airport ride. You know, the car is coming. You know who the driver is. It's going to come a little early. So you're not late for your plane. Eso differentiated with that with reservations as well as fixed pricing, you know, so we never surge. Um, basically, on all of our ads, that was kind of like the main point. You know, never pay search, like, you know, always pay a flat rate. Um, you know, I think we introduced $10 rights within a certain, you know, geography in Manhattan. Um, and those are the ways that I think we were able Thio differentiate ourselves and increased scale on the demand side so that we can, you know, give enough work to our drivers

Who were your early users? What marketing channels, approaches, and marketing tools did you use to contact users? What worked and what didn't?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
users were, you know, and there I was like starting college is like 20 to thirties. Definitely more adoption in the younger crowd. Professionals creatives in New York, mostly living in Manhattan, I think 97% of all yellow taxi rights, it's just within Manhattan. Um, and some maps kind of focus more on, like Brooklyn with deliveries. We focus more in Manhattan and also with kind of the once we had, um, you know, fixed booking, starting with some corporate players over time, I think, you know, experimented with a lot of different marketing strategies. You know, this We launched in 2012 13. So Facebook asked was really You know, the biggest thing Instagram has started in 2010 but not as big as you know. It was later on. Um, we had different kind of PR stunts. Like one time we did you get anything, and for one day you could get anything you want. Like, you know, you can order a monkey to ride with you. You can You can order a birthday cake. You can, you know, get your nails done. I think we just try to be creative and and get out there. I mean, that can was very fun. I'm not sure it was the best r o i e. I mean, really, with our Oh, I wish, really, Google ads and Facebook ads. You know, if you can a B tests and get the language right, that's probably, you know, the best highest.

How'd you hire, incentivize, and track the progress of your sales and marketing team including agencies and part-time workers to scale user base?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
um, we for we. So we have B to B and B to C. Um, you know, for the sales guys for B two B, it's just, you know, having help, making sure we build the right pipeline. E think we have some guys that had, you know, worked for, like, seamless and another kind of, you know, similar corporate pictures where, you know, the investment banks offer food and car service, you know? And so So I know that the guys who who worked for seamless like they have the same clientele. Um, so I think for me to be guys just giving them the right incentives, Thio just make the number of calls starting with the calls and then the final, um, for B to c playing with those different channels. Like I said, um, and I think we we we switch. We tried a bunch of different partners and, you know, try different languages and different designs. It's just Everything is, is trying. Are you know, something works. You go with it. It doesn't work. Try something else.

Who were your competitors when you started and how did the competition evolve? How did you create a competitive advantage and a unique selling proposition?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
right there. E want to say, around 2014 I had to actually go on CNN and with exclusive and talk about how uber had created a disruption of service attack a d. O s attack. And it turned out that we were had been kind of undercutting their competitors similarly with, like, lived and other ones. Um, but we I think we were the first one to kind of, like, break the news with CNN. So way found that there were a lot of cancelations all of a sudden, which was unusual. And then we started tracking who the users were, and we we ended up tracking that they were all uber employees in New York. Um, and it just turned out that, you know, even with the g m, the entire uber team, they were literally just, you know, they all had our app and they were just order council order council order, cancel order counsel on. We went on CNN, um, with exclusive, and we had great coverage, and we actually I think, you know, we were ableto get travels to apologize publicly on Twitter. Maybe the first time he ever apologize. Um, as you know, that was the nature of the competition was very throat, um, really, because of because of industry. But also just because of the uber and the in the way that, um, they preferred competition. And they do find competition. We have to just, you know, we had a lot less resource. Is that uber? We had to just do the best managing our drivers to make sure our driver's air happy. Um, you know, try to pay the driver is similar pay and bonus to compete with uber, um, for users, you know, they were I think they were happy by mostly by paying less, I think because of the fixed pricing by paying $10 within certain geography is Manhattan. Like I said, paying, you know, the flat rates for airports and not over paying, never surging. Um, so, you know, I think I was happy to kind of catch uber and and and make them feel sorry for that, but, you know, otherwise it was definitely more of a David versus Goliath battle. Mhm

What were the major exciting and memorable moments? Were there also any moments that almost got you to quit? How did you get past them?

Based on experience at: US CEO, Gett (previously GetTaxi)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
memorable moments were given in the early days when I was building, starting to build the driver platform. Like, you know, I trained the drivers one on one. In the beginning, I tried to remember their names. I tried toe. I put all the driver phone numbers into my phone. They would call me on my personal cell phone. Um, and I had all their names. So whenever a driver called, I can, you know, addressing by his real name. Um And you know, when when we had problems like the driver tablet, You know, if they had a problem, I would always carry an extra driver tablet with me. Like, even if I was going out to dinner, I would carry an extra one. And if a driver had a problem, I would say, Okay, come meet me at this restaurant and I would just go out and fix this driver tablet, um, moments that almost got me to quit. I mean, I think they're just definitely that when they were building a marketplace, whenever there's a mismatch and demand and supply, it feels like it's over, you know, have a lot of drivers, but no users. Then the all the drivers are complaining other way around and the customers are complaining. So I think that's, um, you know, it feels like this chicken and egg problem that you constantly happened. So those are the toughest, but you just have to just keep going, not give up. You know, you always have toe. Just raise more money and try and try new things, and, you know, second

What responsibilities and decisions do you handle? What are the top three priorities and pain points? What strategies are effective in dealing with challenges?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
um, my randomly assigned roommate from N Y. U actually and I wear the co founders. We've been talking about it for 20 years, and finally, we're both working on a full time. So, um, uses an experiential workplace workspace in New York. Um, we want to re imagine how people work. And I think post co vid it's perfect timing for us. We're realizing that people no longer want to work in the same location five days a week. You know, if you don't have to white go to the office five days if you don't have to stay home five days. So I think the future is just flexibility. Um and we want to create a really special place that you would come about once or twice a week on. But you would really look forward, Thio. So everything about it is out of the ordinary. So no standard desks or chairs. So, thank you know, tree houses in a florist or sitting by a reflecting pool. Oh, are sitting in a cozy corner in the library. And, you know, since Cove it have a natural distancing without the feeling of isolation. So we wanna see Oh choir spaces because we realized the research that the biggest complaint with the office is that there's no quiet place toe work. Everyone not has, like an open floor plan on Ben separate, separate from the quiet spaces. We would have active social places for exploration and team building, along with hospitality and on site childcare, and create a place where you can really be in the zone and achieve flow state and be more productive and, you know, be happier and push yourself.

What helped you to stand out in your hiring process? How should students prepare for interviews?

Based on experience at: Vice President, Strategy & Strategic Investments, J.P. Morgan
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
You know, when I was in school, eso I mentioned I was a marketing major and I switched to finance. Um, that was interesting switch because most people in marketing just assume that if you major in marketing, then you can only get a job in marketing. And I I just I liked to challenge students and that, you know, you should pick. Of course, the major you the most interesting. But But just because that's your major, it doesn't mean that those are the only jobs that you qualify for. We're graduating from college and you're super young, Really. You're totally invincible, and the world is always or you can do anything that you want. What's important, I think, is to understand the different jobs out there. I you know, I was always good at math. That was good in numbers, but I didn't know anything about finance. You know, I had to pick up a couple of books and just, like, read it real quick about kind of Finance 101 there was one, I think called the Vault Guide for, like, I got a little cheat sheet for investment banking. Um, on I just kind of memorize the formulas, you know, the day before and I got through the interview. But I think the most important thing is to believe in yourself and believe that you can do anything. You know, you just make you need to maybe put in more time to research off the different jobs out there. And does that sound interesting to you? What is the day in the life like for someone who has that job? Is that with that kind of give you, like, a springboard to what you want to do later on in life? Um, And then to prepare for the interview, I would say, um, starting with believe in yourself that you qualify for this job, right? Like if you like, because I majored in marketing. If I didn't believe that I could do a job in finance and I would never get the job. So you happiness visualized? I think visualization is really important. Visualized yourself already getting the job and already doing the job. What would make you good at it? Why? Why? Why would you be? You know, the best fit for that job. And you just have to convince the interviewer. Um why you want this job? Why? You're good at it. Why this company particular right? Research the company, understand the culture, understand everything they have on the website and what what they believe is special about, um then just grant.

What college programs did you attend and what were their best parts? How did each of your college programs prepare you for your career?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Sat Oct 17 2020
I wanted to just be in New York City. I felt like the city is really the best education. Um, I knew I wanted to be in business, but I wasn't sure. You know what aspect? Andi, I think just talking Thio. Even if you are sophomore talking to the seniors, you know, talking to the ones that have had internships that all helps you to prepare. I'm not sure college prepares you for your first job at all. Uh, academia. I'm not. You just have to be out there getting any job. Having the experience of working prepares you much more than I think, sitting at any kind of classroom in any great school. So you just have to get yourself out there, get jobs, get internships. Um, you know, talk to people truly about. Like, what is their job like, What do you actually dio if you are a banker or your engineer or, you know, what is it like? What are this girl says you need? What programs do you use? Like, what are what are the deliverables that you work on? What are the presentations? You know what content