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How did you get to where you are today? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path? What inspired you to start your training institute?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
eso I appreciate Appreciate being here. Thank you so much for having me wrote it on a great great first question. Thio dive in. So, um, how did I get where I am today? I started with a very basic university program. Political science. I can't say anything I did before specifically led me into this direction other than the fact that I my parents, were ah, little bit of their hippies eso they had a good social conscious. They talked to me regularly about ways of they thought of improving society, improving life around us. And so even while I was doing a political science degree and thinking about different troubles and challenges education and how it factored into helping people understand MAWR gain trust and contribute positively in the societies where they were wasn't always something. In fact, my head that I cared about And then as my profession professional career grew, it all grew in marketing. So actually, I worked at a marketing agency for about seven years prior to starting Lighthouse Labs and marketing agency was very specifically experienced based marketing. So it was all about how brands and companies were connecting with individuals and creating experiences that help them understand a little bit more about what that brand represented and to me, very similarly, I saw it as education, the whole concept of educating people on your brand and helping them feel and understand your values behind it, uh, was something very similar to how I felt around the university education I got and the different teachers you get and the ones who really tried to mix in experience and help you understand what values were behind the decisions made in history, let's say, or the decisions made behind law and why our political systems are set up the way they were. There's all there's all the principal in value based behind it. On top of that, Beyond that stream of things, I had been looking at teachers in general and how underpaid teachers were. Um, teachers themselves are people who are helping our future grow. They have a huge responsibility and yet often the kind of people that we get who move into teaching, especially in the K to 12 space, where people who are under prepared to properly understand how to approach all the different situations that come from a very volatile and vulnerable set of young minds. Andi, I always thought that teachers should be paid more, that there should be more licensing and certification around it. And we should treat teachers like doctors and lawyers. All those things were kind of in the background, but the reality is, is entrepreneurship other than the fact my parents were both somewhat entrepreneurial, Um, I had I just had a very good collection of friends and one in specific who helped shape the conversation that we had prior to me looking at entrepreneurialism. And then he was actually the one who brought me the idea of starting this company in particular. Partly because I could contribute from a business perspective of marketing and understanding, marketing and sales side, partly because I cared about education on partly because my efforts were always big on trying to make things work. And I was a hustler, you know, as in like it was always about just putting things together to make them happen and delivering on that. And so when you when that was being put out there, over time, I think the idea of okay, this is potentially a person who would do well in this setting became clear enough opportunity came my way. Three consideration for that opportunity was pretty significant, but I had to decide. I've been the same company for seven years. Andi. I had to decide within a month whether I would quit and moved to Vancouver. Move across the country essentially to start this company all within a one month timeframe. I've been to the point of my career where I felt really good about it. Um, I started looking at the whole area of what coding and software was because this was the ask. And truthfully, my background was not technology at all, but kind of made me an excellent candidate for why, from a marketing perspective, because that's who we were targeting people who didn't necessarily what hadn't been in this space, but where there was huge opportunity. Eso, having looked around, looked at it pretty significantly understanding, problem and what problems we were going to be solving. I felt really good about taking a leap into something like this on immediately set off to creating a training institution which mixed in ah whole bunch around. You know, when you build immersive and intensive programs like we dio, it's all about the experience that people engage with to get past their own hurdles and their own roadblocks and really learn the things they need to learn, not just for now, but for when they go into their career and start using them and need those things need to blossom. So the principles behind them, the guiding factors that help people not just stay on learning one piece of information but growing the information they're looking to understand, Um, for me, that all kind of factored into all this little training institute that we started on. It's kind of kept those principles were kind of stuck with us the whole way through.

What training programs and courses do you offer? How much time is spent on in-person and online classes in a week? How many weeks do students typically take to complete?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
currently we offer we have seven open enrollment programs in which we offer a variety of coding and data programs, so we separate them into two main categories. One is re Skilling, people who are really looking to change their careers. Andi those air done an intensive format programs or Web development boot camp and our data science boot camp are two programs that help people who don't necessarily have the previous experience. Take 12 weeks in a 9 to 9 format, very intensive format and come out the other side and go straight into jobs within the fields as developers and as data analysts or data scientists or data engineers. Eso are we are re Skilling programs. Those are the big ones. That's the ones we've built our reputation on. And then we've been building up Skilling programs so more for the hybrid roles the people who actually are in marketing and HR wide writing categories that need coding and data skills. And for that we have to coding up Skilling courses, one that's focused on more of like a full stack Web introduction, whereas ones more front and focus where we see more marketers and designers, product marketers kind of move in that direction the opposite. On the data side, we have a Data Analytics course, which is really just helping people understand the concepts and fundamental to go behind Data Analytics. It's less. We do use tools. We do use languages, but it's really it's just that's just to teach the guiding principles of Data Analytics. And then we have a Data Analytics for HR, which is very specialized course working in conjunction with an association that is giving credit for what, like credits towards certifications.

What process do you follow for creating and updating courses? How do you ensure the relevance of topics and material covered?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
I'd say there's probably 5 to 6 avenues that are informing our curriculums. Eso the first part would be our industry engagement. A t End of day. Almost all our curriculums have to lead to jobs for people are outcomes are pretty major component or they have to B two major outcomes for people on the job. S O R. Feedback loop with employers is pretty substantial. We have employer advisory boards. We have groups that we speak with that air constantly feeding insight and information into the details around our curriculum. And what what gaps there are for students that they're seeing come into their companies? That's a major component of it. The second is it's more of a leadership engagement with our curriculum. So what is changing in the market? What relevant? We have subject matter experts on our team who are always paying attention to what adjustments are happening within the subject matter. So software and data science. What languages? Air changing, What tools, air changing, what principles air Adjusting eso in adjusting those pieces, getting the feedback from those along with industry already kind of tremendous change happens within our curriculum. We adjust our curriculum roughly 5% every month. Eso constantly, we're going to keep it relevant. The third and most important feedback loop, I'd say, comes from our students. So there's, You know, when you're looking at updating courses, you could look at it as what is the material they need to learn to speak successful and how. What? How is that material framed so that people are learning it? Well, there's the learning experience design. And then there's the outcome oriented. Is this working for industry? And so in separating those on our ends, getting all the insight and information from students themselves, we have a tremendous amount of technology that is basically giving people immediate details on Okay, I don't like this part of the curriculum or I'm struggling to learn this. We track a ton of data around where our mentor support is most needed, and when it's most needed and what kind of questions were getting so that we can adjust the curriculum based on purely volume of questions. I'm going okay. These days are obviously not working quite well for people unless that was the intent we get. We have town halls with students where we're getting constant feedback from them. So our goal is to be extremely engaged with student learning process and hear back from students what needs to change, also extremely helpful. And then I'd say, lastly, we So if we're playing with industry and jobs, there is a slight variation to that which is more of subject matter experts space, which is We have big communities of developers and now data scientists who were constantly engaging with. And they're giving us a little bit of a different perspective than, for instance, someone who specifically working with one of our students, uh, and I think, between all of those different avenues adjusting and providing feedback into our curriculum. The reality is we have an amazing curriculum development team, and that curriculum development team, on their own, are making decisions and orienting themselves into what they think needs to change in order to improve our product. That and they're being informed by all those avenues, but also by a ton of the reading and the literature and looking even at our competitors

What criteria do you use to admit students and what are the various student profiles in your programs? What kind of career growth and jobs could students get afterward?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
on letting them into our programs that, first of all that will separate two programs are re Skilling programs have pretty substantial admissions process are up. Skilling programs are open door for anybody who wants to take them, though we definitely try and set expectations as to the kind of people, Well, the kind of people that will succeed in courses like this because we are trying to drive out comes through them, um, for our rooms. Killing programs are admissions. First of all, we're looking for committed learners. So people who when you when we talk about commitment, people who are ready to put the effort in themselves, who know that this is a full time endeavor, we're looking for people who buy Thio in order to prove commitment, have done substantial amounts of research on what do other schools look like? Why am I taking this school? We want people to understand our program versus other programs, and we're looking for people who have done research on the job and career itself. Right when we get people come in and go, Yeah, I kind of heard I could get a job through a program like this. That's not a person who generally gets into our program when we get a person who says I want to be a developer and this is why, uh, that helps us a lot more understand that there know their passion and know that they're here in a mind frame that's going to help them get through what is a very difficult program. Three other sides of that are We don't have prerequisites for coding experience, but we definitely give bonus points for it. We're looking for people who at least tried to self learn back to commitment. If you're willing to pay $13,000 for a boot camp program, I would hope that you tried to learn something for free first. That's usually a good sign for anybody that they've made the efforts and they realize why they're coming here, as opposed to just using it as kind of a cheat code to get in Um, and then and so equally. If if we're talking about experience, what the other side of that is grit and really on that side, we look for people who are understanding of how to take in feedback and criticism and take the failure and turn it into successful people you're going to show this to. I think it matches very well with entrepreneurialism. When you're trying to learn something, you can either pretend you know it all and expect that everything comes your way in a very matter of fact, kind of set structure. Or you can realize you're in a place where there's a lot you don't know. You're gonna try things and fail, and you've got to figure it out on the other side, and that's on you. That's not on anybody else on DSO. We look for students who come into our space like that, who are ready to understand that they're gonna have to fail in order to succeed. They're gonna have to learn the speed. It's a constant pressure. It's a constant feeling, like you don't know what you're talking about. Sometimes you we have almost every student who has at one point another imposter syndrome and realizes this may not be something I'm capable of doing. Am I to, um, I'm not smart enough to do it? Which all of that brings you two was the most important variable, which is growth mindset, and I think growth mindset versus fixed mindset is probably the number one thing that we look for in a student. We're trying to find people who believe that through hard work, through learning through effort, through commitment, through being willingness to fail, they will turn around and be able to succeed in a program because that is the job of the developer. And in a lot of ways of a data scientist, it's problem solving and problem solving means dealing with problems.

How do you enable collaboration, social interaction, and comradery among students? Do you use any software, host online or offline events, or follow any processes for this?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
uh, thistles. A very differentiated program from what you'll normally get in the online space. And one of the reasons is so differentiated is because of how much we encourage social interaction, collaboration and camaraderie. Eso first of all, well, before Cove it started before we were online. Um, there were a lot of in person events and especially ones that connected people to our community. Eso we'd have demo days and we'd have meetups And we have different opportunities for people to show up and just talk to each other, Share information, get a sense of who each other, where we have in our courses. We've always had student experience hours or every couple hours. And, you know, in every week we have a couple hours dedicated to something where students stop learning and working and do something together. So quiz shows jeopardy. We play. Jeopardy will play, you know, best in the world where you're putting a whole bunch of things, which is the best chips in the world, right? What kind of doing brackets on that having people vote on it, whatever it is that just gives people a different perspective on each other s. So there's a lot of social activity that we try to interact and make sure people are interacting, engaging all but in our curriculum itself. We have a bunch of projects that are meant to be done in partnership and impairing So right off the bat. When you start at Lighthouse on day one, there is a pairing pro. You know, a week where you are pair programming or pair working somebody meaning you're doing the exact same thing together and sharing that learning experience. So you're interacting there. We have probably think five projects in which you are working with partners, including our big final projects, which are all demonstrations of what you are able to create. Tons of social interaction, tons of work on collaboration and camaraderie on that side. Andi. Then our tools. And yes, we use quite a lot of them so thes. These students are kind of isolated from the world when they're doing this program because they are working 9 to 9 and it's pretty intensive s. So we have to make sure that people have a lot of ways of communicating to each other and to their mentor. So we use discord right now for group chats and opportunities to just chat with each other online in an easy enough setting and very, very frictionless way. We have slack, which is more for instant messaging. So we build cohorts in our slack channels. Everyone's on slack. Their ability to talk to the whole group or one on one and individually is really emphasize. And we do really push that. Students help students before they ask for mentor help, just so that because we think it's an important aspect of along this interaction aan den. Obviously, I think with our mentors, we have a platform where we have mentors who request assistance. Q. Every time someone needs support, we have just in time support where we have mentors always available, that can show up and help someone that being said, when people are waiting, we really do encourage them to reach out to each other and ask each other for help. And that's been a really good way of getting people together on making sure that they're just They're meeting on all the all the wide variety of levels which are social academic support, general support, which people having life problems, things going on. We have a lot of ways of people interacting on that side on then, yeah, just for fun,how hard that ISS uh, we do both eso We have certain projects that are put that you put the teams together and we have certain projects where they put themselves together. The way it works for us is the long, the further the program is going on. So, towards the end, the final project, they choose teams themselves at the beginning, we're choosing everything for thems, and we're making sure that people are getting a wide variety and mix of each other just to make that easy enough. We've definitely for the reason I said this professor question. We've definitely dealt with all the problems of trying to put people together but also leaving people to their own devices where someone's left out or someone doesn't properly engaged. But we have really good tools to kind of work on that now, and it hasn't been a problem, actually, for the past year and a half, in the same way it used to be

How do you support your students for internships or jobs? How do you prepare them for job interviews? How do you provide networking and mentoring opportunities?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
probably been the most successful in its value propositions program. Overall, eso we are outcomes are like over seven years, 95% of people getting jobs in 120 days. It's been a major component of our program. We produce. We help, I should say, culture. Most Web developers across the entire country other than one University of Waterloo on the group that us more eso in our programs, jobs or everything and where every all all of our programs oriented to make sure people do meet the outcomes. Now how do we support students? Starts with our curriculum itself. So in our curriculum, we will do things like tech interviews We do. We make sure that students are learning how the white board We're making sure that students have projects in their portfolio, so that by the time they're graduating their wealth set up to show someone what they know and what they're about equally within our so if that's in our curriculum, within the 12 weeks that people are with us, we do ah lot of workshops and so we build, resume work, resume workshops, interviewing workshops. We make sure to review those resumes. We give a lot of direct feedback and make sure that people are kind of lining up well, so when they leave, they're in a good place. Um, what? We're currently we've always had a cruise services team that once you graduate, you are interacting with the entire time. So you have somebody who's specifically helping you. We give very good manuals on. Okay, How do you apply for jobs? How do you go out there? We engage with employers and are always sending resumes out for students to make sure that we're helping them find jobs. Although I would tell you, 60% of students that come through here, they're finding their own stuff because the the Thio, the certification and the completion of a program like Lighthouse Labs is good enough that at this point employers are very willing to just understand it higher from the program. At the beginning, it was more like 90% us that had to make sure we're finding jobs for grabs. Um, from there we have a five week career readiness boot camp when people graduate. Now we implemented this drink, cove it just to make sure that people were doing all the things they needed thio. So that would include ideas like going in. How do you brand yourself? Properly? We have mentor support so that your continuously coding our big belief is when you graduate boot camp, you need to keep coding. And that's advice for anybody going into any program. You're done that program, the more you keep working on that skill and actually building, the more prepared you are for the next job that comes your way. Eso, even though we have graduates, graduated every single month. Our belief is that anybody who didn't get a month a job the first month off the job well, there's still ahead of people who just graduated the program because they continuously code. We do a lot of that type of support. We do everything we kind of work through. Interviewing skills will help people with imposter syndrome. We talk about freelancing one of one just so people know how to keep up their funds while they're looking for jobs. We never count that his job help people on that side. All things around coding skills, job skills and career ready skills, and that's our team is very heavily pushed to make sure that every student is getting what they need. We track our stats incessantly. We were the only push people towards what development or data science jobs on towards the actual job of which they were coming to program. So we don't count anything otherwise. And so the other side of our core services team is all employer engagement. And there's a whole host of people that go out there and work to meet employers on a regular basis, help understand what they're looking for, a sure that they're a good place for juniors. We never put people into roles where they're not getting paid, and we never put put people into roles where they don't have a senior on top of them. We don't think anybody graduating from any kind of program really should be their own CTO or leading their own thing right off the bat. Couple years of experience, different stuff

How do you assist students in paying for your program? What kind of scholarships and financial aid are available for students and how can they avail those?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
half the country. Students are eligible for student aid from the government. So first of all, they're able to go out and get student loans. Eso that's been set up through government were in accredited institution, so works through there. We actually have a wide variety of scholarships. Biggest ones right now are covitz scholarships, which are all for people who are unemployed, underemployed or who school got impacted because of Cove. It s so we're offering pretty big scholarships on that front. We also work with a lot of associations and organizations that are helping specific demographics on between them and us funding full scholarship. So we have a partnership with First Nations Tech Council. Um, that's for people of first Nations background. They threw that organization. They could get full scholarships into our program. We have something with own. The I believe it's called the Ottawa Women's Network s O. And when it comes to own women who are newcomers Sorry, Ottawa. I'm wrong. It's new. New coming women s o. All of those women are able. Anyone who is a newcomer to Canada is able to get a full scholarship through the own program. We have something soldiers in tech eso If you are a military veteran and you were looking for a scholarship, we have there are full scholarships through that program with the Rolling Gossage Foundation. So that's something that we try really hard to do. Is build accessibility into programs like this through organizations that no, not just how to provide money to those groups and provide the opportunity of those groups, but actually provides support to those groups as well, to make sure that their entrance into the tech space is as well supported as possible. Otherwise, that we do have deals with banks like bank that offer student financing. So that would be the third way. Lighthouse Labs itself doesn't offer any financing, but we make we build partnerships with different groups that

What marketing software and channels do you use to find and engage prospective students? Which are less effective? Which one do you recommend to students to learn?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
mhm so unique on that. First of all, we really like marketing partners, organizations, associations. They're talking to different demographics of people. So actually, marketing implement is something that we're becoming stronger and stronger at, which is helping other organizations that there people know about programs like ours. Often, I think the most important there's the two most important variables for me and marketing channels are how much? When someone reads what you're putting out there, how much trust do they have based on the channel? When you go through other partners and organizations, there's a stronger built in trust with them vouching for you. So we really like that type of avenue on DTI. Try to use it as much as possible. Obviously we use social media. We're all over social media kind of make sure that we're putting out. We try our best not to put out thio c t. A. Oriented A marketing, but rather were our company is all based on providing value to people. So our marketing ethos is very much around providing value in our marketing as opposed Thio just telling people about ourselves, eso the way we do that, we try to work through workshops. We try to work through big events and big, big informational sessions. But panels and talks around industry and tech changing and how things are adjusting so that people understand that when they look at Lighthouse Labs, this isn't a place that's just out there to tell you, Hey, come take our program. It's not about selling you our product or program. It really is about helping you understand the opportunities and deciding if we're the right bridge for you into that opportunity. Because at the end of day, what our value proposition is more than anything is we're helping people get there fast, right? That's that's It's not the universities and colleges and other groups aren't doing a good enough job to get people jobs. It's just that things are changing so drastically. Our job is to get you there as quickly as possible on DNA. Make sure that then you can have a flourishing career, and for us that that using some marketing and using our social media and using channels all the way from, we try not to do too much out of home advertising. You're not doing billboards. We're not big on that type of stuff. It's really around engagement things where we can talk to people, personalized what we're talking about with them and make sure that it's a good opportunity for them.

How has the demand for certain skills and technologies changed? What kind of jobs would see big growth in the upcoming years?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
element waas thes skill that was top of the list from any kind of what skills. They're going to be critical for your next bunch of years, and it didn't really differentiate they hadn't broken down. What Web development necessarily met. They meant they talked a little bit about languages. But realistically, it wasn't it wasn't well defined. It was just software and Web developer Aziz. We've seen that grow and a lot more understanding of that back of that space. You know, it started by breaking out more into the full stack versus front end versus back in skills. Started talking about the variety of engineering versus campsite First application development skills. Um, language wars will happen always. We what? We started as a more ruby oriented boot camp on, then moved and had javascript in it. We flipped that where we're now more of a JavaScript boot camp with Ruby in it on Lee because javascript was something that everybody was generally using. But Ruby was an excellent, uh, object oriented, programming based language that gave you a little bit of a variation on some of the stuff that javascript maybe struggled with and that certain companies still very much wanted. Part of help. Help open up people into the python rolls into like a whole different space. On the Web development skills side, though, what we're seeing more and more soft skills. So what we're seeing is Web development skills are all needed, Uh, but soft skills and how you use them is really big element. And I think that's where Lighthouse has had. A very large success is when we talk about growth mindset and we talk about the way of collaborating and problem solving and communicate from each other while you're working through projects. Wayto, actually, we teach people how to ask for support, but how we look to learn first before they do it before they just ask people for help. Andi have a area space that is a pretty pretty big on respect and tolerance. How you know your professional environment, Um, people who go through a program like ours they don't didn't have a background in Web development, so they didn't have a background in tech often walking into this industry that having a little bit more of the norm of how you handle yourself in that that being challenged is normal that making mistakes is normal and you don't have to be defensive all those pieces very important, this skill base. And then you look at data science and why we launched data science and even Data Analytics. Data industry had been growing tremendously for a long time. Um, but it was gated. It was very academic, based on Do not very open to non academic entries. That's changed quite drastically. So are what we're seeing is a lot more interest in data science talent. People who have coding skills, who understand data science But aren't data scientists people who have math skills but are meeting or software skills? There's a real jumble on that side that is leading to what we see us. Three distinct ads, but they're all sharing certain parts, which is Dave Science data analysts and data engineer. All three of them require some nation of skill sets that are still, I'd say it's still a very, uh, new industry in terms of defining very clearly what people want I What we've noticed is things around machine learning and deep learning, valuable, but and we do have a bunch of in our program but could be oversold if the program is too far oriented towards that, we also see that people are too often selling tools, so trying to trying to make sure that everybody is using Jupiter Tableau or whichever one you're looking at, it's not tools, and that's that's really the key to a program like ours. It's never just about the tools the tools are. What helps you walk in the door and use something you're comfortable with. But that stuff is going to change tremendously over time. Andi, we've noticed that being something that actually caught on in data science faster than it did in Web development, where Web development for a while people were. It felt like people were just looking for experience with languages and tools. The soft skills piece of data science is very much intact, and it's something that people are looking for right off that the next thing we see in terms of what's changing is cybersecurity and the growth in that space we see big growth in play areas like cybersecurity, artificial intelligence. Specifically we're seeing like Dev ops and Real Growth in a Dev Dev Patel preparations. I'm trying to think I feel like oh, I guess you X Y has always been a thing that's been categorized as important. I wouldn't say I don't know that industry is telling us more or less that that's needed as a particular skill, but it's always the value.these are like think resources that are online. I should probably spend a lot more time staring them down and actually find the right resources. What I would say, I think, is most important. There's two things that I think really help people, one working on projects where the goal of the project is to demonstrate it and put it in front of people. I think that when you do that, the pressure to actually get it right and do something well mixed in with the fact that you're collaborating with someone and trying to work through how you're going to build this plan and x amount of time and estimate it and think about all the decisions that go into it. I think it's very, very good training for soft skills, but I've noticed data science is there's a big propensity to push everybody to work individually independently. I think that's great from what their job actually often is. It's not surprising, but their interaction with a ton of people in a company is pretty riel, and when they have to collaborate on where what they're learning or what they're taking away or on the development side, what they need set up. Those collaborative skills are pretty critical and are ones that I think come from group project work. So I would say like I think, what's missing a little bit out There is opportunities for people to get together and just work on side projects together in order to game those type skills. And then, lastly, it's presenting and presenting is not necessarily about standing in front of a room of people and giving a great talk. What it really is driving home is the idea is that you have to figure out how to very clearly insistently provide information to a wide range of people in a similar language. So when you're talking to 20 people, they could be 20 people that understand data science or 20 people that don't understand data science. How much you want to focus on your methodology versus how much you want to focus on the results of the implications. I think the more you work on those presentation skills and then and then see how people felt about your presentation, see what kind of questions they ask. Allow yourself to get challenged and not be defensive. Uh, that's a good that's a good says skills for entrepreneurs. Why, they say the entrepreneurs always be pitching. Always go out there. You learn so much, but you also gain a soft skill of listening. You gain a soft skill of properly being articulate and clear and understanding your group of people that you're talking to. And ultimately it's about communicating information so that others can use it. And I think that those those skills come from just a simple group project with a presentation now the pressure.

What were the major exciting and memorable moments? Were there also any moments that almost got you to quit? How did you get past them?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, Lighthouse Labs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
memorable moments in my career. I should probably pay attention to the time because I don't I could go on this one for a long time, but I will say, uh, right when I touched down in Vancouver the first day I ever touched down in Vancouver to start Lighthouse Labs, I will never forget the feeling I had. It was a feeling of adventure and excitement and nervousness. And, um, what am I doing here all in one eyes? It made me feel extremely alive and excited for next steps. Uh, I think it's our company grew. I remember Our first cohort was exciting. We had a few people in it we saw. Okay, this is going well, but our our second cohort. So we went from five students to about 18 in our second, and I remember getting 18 students and thinking, Oh, my God. I think we have something here. Like, I think this could work because people were paying us $7000 at the time. And it wasn't a light, a small priced item, and we saw some significant interest. So we were really I was really excited. Um, I'd say the joke is that third cohort. We barely got any students, and I and we almost went bankrupt. And I went Oh, boy. Okay, I guess this is what entrepreneurship is. Uh, and that whole Siris of time going through there at the same time we had, We started with six business partners and our five partners and myself. And I'd say in that six month period, that period taught us who was right for the company as a partner and who wasn't. And if there were moments that I wanted to quit, I'd say those five months where some moments where it was really being divided on What is the philosophy we're going to take to drive this company forward? At the time, I wasn't the CEO. There was no CEO yet We're all kind of working on it. And coming out of that, we had two partners leave. And that was the moment that I became the CEO of the company on bond. I think I think that from there there's been Well, I'm just thinking through our first, we ran a huge event with 500 people in a single location and then did it across the country and six different locations. That was, I got to stand on stage after taking a huge risk to do something pretty monumental. Largest in person coding event in the history of North America on Bond, I gotta stand on stage and talk to a bunch of people about why all this coming together was so important. That was a pretty memorable moment. I would say I had. We had. We got accredited as a school and when we fought for about a year and a half to be accredited with government and actually be a registered education institution and at times that it was just crazy. How much work had to go into that for a small startup? How many resources you have to put yourself into? Just make it work. And so when we got that registration, I remember that day like like yesterday. It was amazing. Um, I have some really fond memories and some very clear memories of our employees and staff, all getting together outside of work and doing things together where it felt like I was with a group of my best friends. I'd say those moments will stick with me forever. They're extremely memorable on then. I do have a memory of one of our years where we stagnated lost about $500,000. We haven't made enough profit previously that we were feeling covered. And whereas owners and partners, we have to come together inside where we're putting money in the business or were we not? And where was this taking us? Um, we probably that that one conversation led to about six months of some pretty intense. Even we ended up putting money in the business. But it's Leadsom pretty intense fighting, pushing principle based arguments. What's the direction? How do we want to do this? Do we want to be in this business? What does it mean if we don't? But you know, can't find a buyer like all this different stuff that I think. I think at times in those six months I absolutely was done with our company, mostly because I didn't want to be in our partnership group at the moment at all. Like those six months clarifying cleaned up all the little points of friction that may be so really, there's two distinct periods of time since I started the company that we had to have some pretty intense partner arguments that one that lead to anybody leaving that one led to a very centralized kind of everybody going in the same direction group that had addressed all the kinds of problems that come with this business that no longer we're just pretending things were good over here. Good over there. Um, and by doing so, I think we became much stronger company from it. So I'd say that is both a moment. I almost quit. And an extremely memorable moment for all its positives that came out of it. Um, yeah, I think I think I think then probably you know, it's pretty recent, but well, actually, I'll do one more previous and then I'll tell you the most recent one. But, uh, we had launched our time. We have launched our program in Toronto, were originally Vancouver, and we launched a program for Toronto and we started. We built our program in Toronto over, I don't know, a year, and then we have to find a new space in Toronto, and we made this decision that we felt good enough that we could kind of really build a much bigger school. Onda. We went in downtown Toronto got this big space 13,000 square feet of space in the center of downtown Toronto. Uh huh. Space had been a marketing agency, so it was all kind of already set up nicely and looks beautiful. I remember I at that time was that's exactly what I was moving back from Vancouver to Trump's. So with my wife and I have decided we were going to make our move back, and when we made that move, it was four days before we were watching the space, and we ended up doing a really big event space launch on kind of felt in a lot of ways, like we're moving into the next chapter of our company. My family happened to be there. My wife's family happened to be there. My partner's families happened to be there who, you know, one of my business partner, uh, Spirit 13, known his family extremely well, and it just felt like a very special, unique happy moment. A joke that me and my partner make all the time is that launching a 13,000 square foot space was also like, you know, in hindsight, we we don't want that space like I would not, you know, especially with what's going on right now. Uh, cos sometimes make too big deals around people running companies make too big a deal, sometimes around having big spaces or the things that aren't really but that make you feel like you've made it or make you feel riel. And I could say I was definitely a little bit of sucker for that moment right then and there. But I'll remember it memorably because of how I felt about a moment. I'll remember it fondly forever, Um, recently the most the most intense moment that we've had to go through it lighthouses when covert hit and when it hit we looked at our runway, we looked at everything and I decided to make very quick decisions so that we're not gonna be left hanging. And the quick decision, the biggest hardest decision we made was that we ended up letting go of 13 people in our company, which to some people, a lot, some people's a little we re size 60 person company at that point to 55% company. So you know, significant portion of people and more importantly, we always treat people extremely well here never saw something like that's never happened. The White House and I had to sit through. I made sure to be in the meeting room with every single person that was leaving and tell them directly myself and have a conversation with them and go through that process. But the goal in doing that was to make sure that nobody else had to be let go because finances for the next year, because we really didn't know what was gonna happen. So by doing this, we felt our revenue like how much money we already had and where revenue potentially would be. We could keep people safe for a longer period, and I'm very proud of that moment. As much as I'm sad that it had to happen because I think it did provide the security for a business, and that was like a true for me. It was one of those challenging personal versus CEO moments that I knew I had to make the decision that I was able to make it quickly, so it was my own personal growth. Um, I have some amazing stories of those 13 people. We give them all opportunity to go through a program, some of which have and are now working as full time developers and loving it. I got some amazing notes back. I'm still in touch with pretty much every person there, but at the same time, because we're administration from insecurity. Believe that was gonna happen. And we started looking instead of asking, How do we just make money? How do we make sure Financially we just survive. We started asking what we could be doing in a moment during covert and our staff and our team. We're all extremely empathetic towards everything that was going on around us, and the decision was to come up with a set of big scholarships, of which we weren't giving money. But we're letting people in for significantly less money. And that was the scholarship I mentioned before the Cove in 19 scholarship, allowing people who have been affected in their work or schools to take a program like this and change their career into what we saw as likely a still growing industry during an otherwise very stagnant time. Uh, are decreasing time and we've done We've put through a million dollars in scholarships since that moment, but I will remember what I will always remember when we first launched scholar Apple Well and more importantly, all that

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? If any, please also discuss your experiences facing adversity, or trying something unusual.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
I think one that the more you understand your values and principles and the more you understand your company's values and principles, and the more you reconcile that they're not always aligned. But you know how they are aligned. The better vision and direction you can provide to your company, the better vision and direction you confined to yourself. Onda more you'll understand when you're not the right person on. I think that that's a very biggest, probably one. The most important lessons I could learn and running lighthouse labs, especially from the beginning to now, is that Lighthouse Labs has its own set of values and principles. That, though I helped shape a lot of them how this company grows e Migros person and separating those two and making sure there's a separation of those two for the entire company to see and know is extremely important so that when we're discussing things just because my opinion is different or I think differently, that doesn't mean I'm right, and it and leading kind of building that is hugely important for a company. But it's it's helpful because it drives direction as well. It's not just about me not affecting it in one way or another. It's just about driving myself and getting a lot of validation in my own life outside of my work and knowing what I stand for but allowing my company to have the same thing and hoping that those two things come together and when they don't asking questions of whether they should or shouldn't and asking my team. Those questions say the second Life lesson is that nothing nothing is going to be extremely successful without a deep seated effort of trust being built. I think trust is the basis for me of almost everything successful. So I think trust customers are looking to buy your product and by and look at your brand, understand you. I think more than anything marketing now is people need to have trust. They want to know what you're about. They want to know what you're doing. That could be very divisive as well. It could be problematic, but I think working to build trust is very important, as you are constantly trying to change and adjust. And the more you have trust, the more people are willing to work with you when things change in a way that are not necessarily good. The more they are willing to believe in what you want, the more you believe in what they want and the more you have that resolve to get through harder times. I think trust is what allows you to build pride. I think a company and a culture that you're trying to build has to be built on employee pride. I think if employees aren't proud to work there and be there, your brand and your what you put out there in the world will never be extremely successful on DSO because of that, if you want that employees pride, pride doesn't happen unless there's trust. And so I really think like I've learned, I've come to learn pretty much everything I look at in the world. I start with the question of why is there a lack of trust or is there a strong trust and what does that mean to, and how would you build that trust if you needed to? Uh, I think you asked me Yes. Oh, lessons. First for me was I was somebody who always felt that I needed to provide solutions to solve problems on I continuously wanting involved. I want to be involved in the process to find the solution. I love providing my opinion. I feel like doing things, showing people that by helping them doing it, I'm being a cost more. My career is grown. No, I've actually found E what provides that Vision guidelines were actually a lot of room to solve their own problems and go through the reps of solving those problems on them. Or you just help your there to ask the right questions, but really push them to think about it themselves. Uh, actually, the more the faster you succeed, the more you succeed, the more people feel a part of that success, onda more. You feel excellent about yourself. I think when you really are guided by, always wanted to try the solution. You struggle when you aren't providing the solution too much because there's a personal identification in it. When you're always asking questions and just trying to think about the problems and try to think asking a group of people to solve the problems when those problems aren't solved, use a team could kind of look at each other and say we all we did our best we did what we're doing, you know, how do we do? Better as a group, But there's a little bit less of your person and your validation inside which what I've come to realize is your person in your validation being intertwined and all that kind of stuff. Eyes usually messy and worse for problem solving than it is better. Three Ego kind of does not help in the grand scheme of problem solving. So I'd say those three life lessons for me are pretty big ones that I've learned over my career. Uh, just in terms of separating self from company, I think they all kind of reflect on that on there, all different towards my leadership style as well.

What starting job (after internship) would you recommend to students who hope to grow professionally like you? What other parting advice, dos, and don'ts would you give?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 18 2020
so I think the most. Personally, I think there's always great stories of really young people becoming successful entrepreneurs. But I think there's way more successful entrepreneurs who actually had some decent professional experience, 56 years professional experience and at 28 29 turned around and decided to start a company. Um, that means that I would not be over. I don't be hard on yourselves. Don't be upset. Don't be frustrated at If you are a young entrepreneur that you haven't built, you're amazing company. Yet there's an over amount of pressure on trying to figure that out at 23 24 because somebody else did. I think gaining professional experience helps you a lot right after you've solved the first part of a startup. So the first part of a startup is just Is there a product market fit And is there something that I can do here is that will people pay me money for the thing I wanna put forward? And how do I figure that out? But very quickly it becomes okay. How do you build a professional organization that sustains that drives that forward people with professional experience behind them tend to get there faster on DSO. I think any kind of job in any kind of work in a professional setting and corporate setting that gives you a little understanding of the systems and setups and templates and things that work allow you to be a much better manager, allowing up build faster and better operations. Eso my recommendation is building some work experience until you have that startup idea and you have that company ready to go. Don't be afraid of taking a job and going and working in a company. I think it's a very important set, and I would focus on core skills, things that are really important offs. Marketing, finance, software. These are all things that you're gonna use, likely no matter what. When starting a company sales go gain, go gain the advantage in those skills right off the bat. Um, I think surround yourself with good people and professional people and people who will be critical of you. I probably overdo it. My friend group is a eyes very mean friend group. They're constantly, constantly challenging me, giving me a hard time, never putting me on any kind of pedestal. If anything, putting me on underground a little bit. I think it's excellent for what the real world is around you. I think as you're growing, it could be very lonely, is you're trying to start a company. There's a lot of people who challenge you both passive aggressively and aggressively, and I think being able to deal with that with comfort and know how toe believe in yourself while dealing with those things is very important. So I'd say Surround yourself with a network of people and push yourselves to be to ask challenging questions and constantly think thinking is critical, Which sounds such a basic statement. But it's so true. Um, and then I guess the last part is there's there's a riel fascination with becoming an expert. I think everybody's out there giving talks after one year of starting their company. I think people are constantly trying to give advice. Content marketing really falls into thought leadership and panels and speaking, and you know, I've doing this talk, for instance, is always a little bit, um, contrary to my character. I actually love talking with people and helping them and answering questions for them and giving them my my personal experience. But I'm very reluctant to drive myself as a thought leader because I think that's when you become the opposite of what you should be. Which is your calling yourself an expert. Instead of calling yourself a curious individual who wants to learn more, I'd say Never do everything you can and surround yourself with employees and people who do not allow you to buy into the ego or the authority that comes with running a company Just because you're in that position and just because people people want a leader, they'll treat you there. They'll leave you there. They'll be happy there and you'll take that is validation that you belong there. But in reality, I think your job like what I look at when I look at Lighthouse. Now, after seven years, I go, I'm an owner of the business and I'm a CEO of the business. I served to gain a lot. Maura's the owner of a business that doesn't know anything with a great CEO. Then I served to be a good CEO in my own company that is not moving forward, but I feel great about myself. I am not my job. A CEO is to provide a company that becomes valuable and strong. It is not to make myself feel powerful or authoritative or anything like that, and I think the more you could refrain from that, the more you realize that your job is actually replace yourself every step of the way. It's always to find someone who could do the thing you're doing better and put them in place. That will probably drive you more as a successful entrepreneur than ever, thinking that you're the best to do anything because your value is in the ownership of your company. Your value is in this thing becoming successful. Your value is not improving to people that you actually know what you're doing. Um, it being inquisitive and telling people you don't know is a very good way of diminishing the tension and immediately asking them questions and seeing if they know and that's what you should be focused on. Do other people know? And can they help you? Not? Can I show them that I'm the right person to lead? I'd say that kind of stuff for where I've where I've gotten to it is important. The only other piece of advice I'd probably give people is It's very hard to look past the just getting some initial success in a company. The two thing to piece of advice I kept getting when I was when I started Lighthouse. I think we're both really bad pieces of advice, and so I'm going to try and counter those a little bit one. Just build a company and get to funding as quickly as possible. Let us lots of boost bootstrapped. For six years now, I did say we had a point in time where we almost went bankrupt. But what it really did force us to think about was how this business actually was making money, and it took a little bit longer than had we gotten funded. But the flip side is we didn't make any of the mistakes that a lot of our competitors did, and we recently competitors that got heavily funded that seemed like they were just gonna beat us out and kill us. They just went bankrupt and they went back up with a ton of money having been spent, and they never figured out a solution of how to actually build a properly monetized company. Um, I would just say, Do not go raise funds for a PR or for your own feelings. Raise funds because you need them and it's the right time and it's a good idea. Um, you know, I think that I think that's a critical piece of advice that everybody kept giving us in the beginning that I think was wrong. The second thing is no your partners and envision some success and envision yourself actually being in this business for the next 5 to 6 years. I don't think anyone properly prepares us for how much of our life ends up being the subject matter of the business were running. And if you do find success, listen, we all hear the stories of Facebook. Huge company. Massive Multibillion. Most companies are not that company, but there's a lot of successful companies now. Those successful companies, they could be 25 million revenue companies. They could be $40 million revenue companies, but they really focus on a couple of subjects. We focus on education and my big thing is tech skills. I all of a sudden I've been in ah world of tech skills for seven years. I had never touched tech skills before. This is my This is my life. This is what I think about it. Talk about, um I'd say no that you're gonna be in this business for a while if it is successful and make sure it's what you want. Make sure it's what you want to do, because I think very quickly if you're somebody who needs you know, if you're someone who always needs change and needs things to be different, a successful company is not necessarily the place for you. Start ups could be connection, and it leads to a lot of bad decision making. And if you really want to be good at running a company, you've got to know that you might be there for a while and and that you're committed to being there for a while because that's what drives everybody else's committee. So I'd say that's probably the only other Don't or do I would put in