SkootTV CEO & Co-Founder
Arizona State University Bachelor's Degree, Business and Psycology
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How did you get to where you are today? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path? What inspired you to work on this startup idea?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. Um, yeah. I mean, a lot of life experiences got me to where I am today. I grew up in Topanga Canyon, which is a community in Los Angeles, and I was always, um, a rambunctious kid who would be playing in the creek. And my parents always had dogs, and I was really always, like, really into pets. And so I was, you know, my dogs are my best friends, and I was in the creek discovering and finding other animals play with, um I eventually, uh you know, I was walking dogs in my neighborhood when I was, like, 12 years old for extra, you know, lunch money after school. Eventually, when I graduate high school, when I went to college there I was always like the resident, sort of like dog sitter, pet sitter, You know, for my friends, they go out of town. And then when I graduated, college was actually the height of the recession, and I initially intended to go into becoming a sports agent. And after going around doing some interviews, I quickly realized it wasn't when I was after and started working at Fortune 500 companies Learning software sales, which was a great experience and eventually got interested in startups. And I was head hunted to go work for a new startup called Zoom Box, which was digital postal mail within a few months. That company, um, sort of right out of speed. And I found myself with a quarter life crisis, not knowing what to dio. And that's when I was reading about Tim Ferriss for our work week. Um, that inspired me to start a lifestyle business where I started my first real dog walking company called Surf Dog L. A. Which was started off as just as me walking dogs in my neighborhood. And I built a business around it, you know, setting up starting my company, uh, putting up a Facebook page, learning Facebook, marketing, buying, going to dog parks, promoting my business. And very quickly it became a huge success. Um, you know, I was my initial goal was, Can I make the same money in the first year? Um, with my dog walking business, as I did with my first, you know, really job out of college. And I achieved that. And then in the second year it was Can I make the same money as I was making it the startup that I just left to start this lifestyle business right, which was, like $100,000 a year. And I was able to achieve that my second year. And then in my third year, I was like, Okay, can I continue to double moving forward? And I was on track to double my business once again, Um, when I found out that my girlfriend and I were pregnant and now that my lifestyle business is going to really need to look, a tsum changes. And so, um, I started thinking about how I could either scale my existing business going national, um, kind of franchise it when Just sort of fortuitously, I got an email from some guys who moved on from Silicon Valley who you know, wanted had an idea for, like, a dog walking app that was like a lead generation product for dog walkers. And initially I sort of like Necdet because I was really good at doing my own marketing and my own legion, and that wasn't really the issue. Um, but then they sent me some screenshots on what they had sort of, you know, the concepts of it. I was like, Oh, wait a minute. Like this is not some legion product. This is a uber for dog walking product. This is the way I could scale my business for me. My dog walking business was a great, you know, had a great revenue model. And it produced a lot of income for me. If I could scale this with technology that I could, you know, sit back and forth, you know, pay for my new family. Um and that's how I got started working on Wag and I met with the guys. There were 22 brothers and, you know, they basically asked me, like, you know, what are you doing? What do you like? I said, I'm not typical dog Walker. I've worked at startups. I've worked at Fortune 500 companies, and my ambition is to have the largest dog walking company in the world. And then these two brothers sort of nodded each other, and they basically offered me the CEO title for sweat equity and percentage of the business. And I got started right away, and I immediately pitched my parents. They put in the first check in tow, wag and we got started and, you know, Ah, lots inspired me to do this kind of work. It's just like pets have always been a place for me to just unwind with my day or to cheer me up. And, you know, the sort of love and respect that your pet shows you. I like showing it back. And I really wanted to show the world that, you know, dog walking isn't some hobby. It could be a real business and respected business. If you're doing it right, then your clients, you're going to see that, and you're gonna be able to make, you know, profit from your ideas. Um, if you follow your passion. So really, it was just like what inspired me. It was all just following my passion.

What is the elevator pitch of your startup? What problem does it solve? How were your customers solving their pain point before your startup?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah, Great question. So, for wag the elevator picture is pretty simple, right? Um, we were, like, this is uber for dog walking, and the problem is solved. Waas um, for pet parents, they live very busy lives before covert especially. And they would come in a situation where they needed someone to walk their dog. Um, sometimes last minute things happen and you know, millennials and folks who need their pet cared for. They would typically have someone who walk their dog, but they weren't always available at the drop of a hat. And so wag was there to make that solution easier for tech parents. A zealous offer, other additional services like a recurring dog, walk or or other other services. And so, you know, the pain point was, there's a lot of people who have dogs who don't necessarily have the resource is to care for those dogs. They're either busy with work or busy with other engagements. And so we were basically the ability just toe to get that resource at the drop of a hat with, you know, the tap of a button on your phone and you have a qualified dog walker at your door.

Can you walk us through your first few weeks when you started working on this project? How did things change over the next few months?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. So when it first started, like I said, it was really just some concepts. Nothing had really been engineered or fleshed out or sort of, you know, run through the business model. But because of my experience, having my own dog walking company, um, I knew that what we had to do right away, which was we had to have a great funnel toe onboard dog walkers, right? We need to have the right. I already knew the right pricing for our market. So were ableto plug in the pricing. Um, you know, start on boarding the supply side of the marketplace, coming up with some of the marketing concepts to stimulate demand on the other side of the marketplace from the consumer side of it. And so a lot of like promotions, right? You'd be at the dog park talking with people. We had one of our staff where, like, a I got us a mascot, which was like a full body suit dog, because I did that would attract people to come talk to us what we were doing. And that was how you know, really had a sign up. She is taking the information this app is launching soon, and we'll we'll let you know when the APP launches. So it's really just about validating your idea and trying to with the marketplace concept, especially. You need to work on both the supply side and the demand side on DTI. Try to understand the certain how those two sides we're gonna commerce and communicate and what theorized what problems they might have initially and do your best to sort of lay some groundwork, uh, to solve that. And then over the next few months, we were able to get that product up within a few months. And then it's a whole different ballgame right now. You're, you know, dealing with the rial marketing campaigns and, you know, riel activity on the product and, you know, people actually walking dogs. And that brings its own sort of potential issues to the forefront. Because dogs air, you know, their animals and unpredictable and city streets could be very unpredictable in Los Angeles or New York City. Um, and so you know, you also once you've now validated your idea, you need to raise capital to support that idea. We had a product that worked at a business model that, um, was was valid. So we need to go raise capital s so we can scale that so we could generate, you know, onboard more supply and generate more demand. And so we had to go raise capital, and that's what we did. And actually, what we did was we Then, um, we knew that a lot of the BCS were in San Francisco. So after we had proven the product in L. A, we tried as quickly as we could to go launch San Francisco to start gaining attention off folks in Silicon Valley. And that's why we moved there for a month, launched the product there, and basically, we had a playbook that we were able to to deploy into new markets.

What were the challenges in building the initial team and how did you overcome them? How much time and resources did founding team members commit?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. So fortunately for us, the initial team was pretty good. Um, my partners had done had worked in Silicon Valley before, Had worked at start ups before Aziz founders. So they sort of understood the ropes of the game. And I understood how that you know how the game worked. And we already had a designer in house who was really, um, efficient, smart, hardworking designer. We already had a small engineering team, right? We had myself and we have some other resource is we're willing to sort of, like, just be very passionate and work really hard. And so when you talk about how much time and resource is all of our time and resources, right, we had to commit basically everything for the first year. I remember for really the first year I worked, you know, seven days a week, every single day. My daughter was born in that first year, and I had to work at the hospital, you know, while in the delivery room basically like answering customer service emails. So, you know, I think the message there is if you're looking to succeed in your startup, you need to be willing to commit whatever it takes. Resource is, but mostly time

How did your venture get its first professional funding? What were the challenges and how were they overcome? How'd your fundraising efforts change in subsequent rounds?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. So, like I mentioned before, we decided Thio tryto deploy our playbook of launching Los Angeles in San Francisco because we we understood that that's where the majority of silicon of the VC firms that participate in marketplace ideas were. And so we launched the city and we actually did a lot of cold, cold emailing. And I know a lot of you see say that like, they don't read their emails and some say they do. But I can tell you like we just cold email blasted all of the firm's up there and and we got responses and we got meetings and a lot of people said, like, you know, this isn't gonna work And other people saw the opportunity and said, Hey, if you could get this toe work, um, you know, this is sort of, ah, wide open space for you to capture the market in the pet space. And so the challenges were tremendous, right? Like no one had ever trusted someone to come into their home before, uh, to care for their pet, and especially from a nap, right? No one ever trusted an app to do that yet. And so, um, we had to do a lot of work to promote, like the trustworthiness of our business and the quality of our dog walkers. Right? And, um, you know, and then, you know, our fundraising efforts After that, once we proved it and that we had a playbook that was good enough to sort of, like, get our first round and then in follow on rounds, You know, the story was a little bit different. It was more like, Okay, can we really scale this this company, right? Like, Okay, it works in L. A. And it works in San Francisco. And since we're working in New York, But can it work in Omaha, Nebraska, right. Can it work in some of these smaller markets? Is that have you know, mass appeal? And so that's what we set out to prove Onda geun the You know, the demand was still there, even in in sort of smaller markets and then subsequent rounds from that it really became Maura about like, Well, now that you've proven this one use case, what other value, right? What other sort of, um what other additional? What other value can you offer this? Consumers like, can you Can you broaden the category? Can you step into some other elements of the category on offer new services? And and that's what we try to establish a new with, like offering boarding and sitting. And we have a grooming truck in Los Angeles. And, you know, we were thinking about other ways that we can, um, provide value to our consumers and our supply side. And so that was what future around sort of became most about on. Eventually, it sort of, I think, fell on like, Can we take this international? And and that's, you know, where things have been since.

How did you set the scope for your minimal viable product? How did you get to product-market fit? How did your product evolve over time?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
so for minimum viable product, right? We basically took my existing business model at Surf Dog, which is my business before wag. And we already understood that. You know, you parents need these services, but would they trust it from an app that really became the crux of our viable product? Like, how can we make the app trustworthy enough and function well enough and have enough liquidity in the market where someone requests a dog walk? Uh, two o'clock. We have a dog walker available on the spot to go walk that dog at two o'clock. Right? And so we were able to sort of find product market fit relatively quickly because we'd spent the months prior on boarding enough supply side so that when the demand came on, we could make those connections. So once those those connections started happening and people were paying, you know, paying for these dog walks and tipping the dog walkers and sharing us on social media, we had, like, a report card that you could share which for us is like a, you know, sort of like a net promoter. Score right, Like if someone's willing to promote this business, then there's pretty good sign that there's product market fit here, Um, and then so that that became very clear, very clear, relatively quickly. Once the product was launched and we were making sales, and then the product evolved. Ah, lot over time. You know, as I mentioned, you wanted to try and dip into different categories or sort of own the category. And, you know, we need to build a lot more back end tools, more customer service tools. There's a lot of customer service touch points in a dog walking at scale. And so there's a lot of like back end, sort of, um, automation and bringing, uh, bringing the Wag customer service to the both the pet parent and the dog Walker, because they both used us as, like the hub to solve troubleshooting and issues and things of that nature. And so, yeah, we just had to build, um, or sort of intuitive product over time that could automate certain steps

Who were your early users? What marketing channels, approaches, and marketing tools did you use to contact users? What worked and what didn't?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. I mean, our early users were folks like I said, we did a lot of promotions at dog parks nearby, and we had a sign up sheet. And so when we told them that the product was finally available, we were based in West Hollywood. We saw a lot of our early users were just folks who had gone to the dog park in West Hollywood and gotten and received that email, right? And so our early marketing channels were, you know, paid Facebook acquisition, which was, you know, much cheaper than, um, it was even cheaper before my first dog walking company. Uh, so we leveraged Facebook ads. We did a lot of email campaigns, um, promotions in person promotions. And you know, what worked for us was we found that as we paid for these social media like Facebook acquisition, that we got like, a double win because we would get that user. But then we also we had a big word of mouth factor, sort of a k factor involved, and so that would that would actually spawned Mawr organic downloads as well. And and like what we discovered is like our organic users, we're actually much mawr sort of devoted to the product than the paid users. So, um yeah, you know, I mean, but I think you have to be able to explore the entire flywheel from a marketing perspective. And I think we did that right. I don't think we left any stone unturned, but then the trick is is like finding which of those channels works that can scale. And how do you become more of a champion at that channel?

What changes would you attempt in customer targeting, acquisition process, and marketing tools in the later growth phase? Why?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
as we scaled the business into new markets, Right. Um, we discovered that the channels to the consumer basically stayed the same. We did some partnerships and things of that nature which helpful at larger scale. But really, the target eventually became on the on the walker side of the supply side. Because, um, the way that these on demand startups work, you need have a lot of liquidity, a lot of supply side, like more supply than users. To make sure that these users aren't waiting around right, I think, like uber. Sure, they'd have mawr uber drivers. And you can imagine to make sure that all the consumers are not waiting super long to get to their to get picked up. And so we had to start developing riel acquisition processes and channels toe onboard dog walkers at scale and not market by market. Um, and that was and that was tricky for us because we had a really fine tune process, um, to do it market by market, but to turn it to start sourcing people interested in dog walking at scale, we had to just deploy in tow, you know, like job forms. Um, you know, indeed Craigslist things of that nature as channels and then put them and then still put those channels through our process. So we had to sort of implement, um, you know, we already had the Dog Walker sort of process. That was really that worked really well to bring out good talent. But now we need to plug in a lot more volume through it and manage those processes because we had a whole team on the back end that would make sure that those who are applying could could do the job as professionals. Um, even though many of them were gig workers, we need to make sure they were qualified to care for someone's pet. So again, I think that end up being one of the more tricky, um, customer targeting and processes that needed a lot of more change in the growth stage.

How'd you hire, incentivize, and track the progress of your sales and marketing team including agencies and part-time workers to scale user base?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. So we had a We had an internal sales and marketing team. But we did also use agencies, right? Onda, lots of part time workers. You know, you you do whatever else is you just, you know, you keep track of the metrics And what what? Campaigns are working and what aren't right. We use products like Branch Branch Link Thio track Which campaigns were working. Um, you know, we got more of the team involved at this point, like some of the might. You know, we have these agencies running, so you have to have some one as the point of contact with that agency while another folk, like maybe on the almost like on product, was handling like the in house marketing team. And so you have this division split between C suite on, you know, when there was agencies or marketing or growth and getting them all to work together. And you're basically just constantly looking at your cost to acquire a customer, right? And when the CAC is getting too high in one, you really start pushing on these other channels and other teams to see what sort of learnings you're getting from those teams And can we apply those learnings across to these other teams? Thio. Make sure that we're acquiring our users at a clip that makes sense for us based on our lifetime value.

Who were your competitors when you started and how did the competition evolve? How did you create a competitive advantage and a unique selling proposition?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah. So it's It's interesting, I think, when we first launched, there's actually another within 30 days of lad launching in L. A out of the blue, another on demand dog walking company called Ziggy Ziggy emerged in L. A to compete with us, and we didn't know, But they had, you know, they were more funded than we were. They started with, like, a million dollars, and they put a lot of money into their product. Whereas we started with, like, a few 1000 and really like, bootstrap, the whole thing or really scrappy um And so it was. It was like battle stations right out of the gate. We thought we'd at least have timeto like work on L. A. Before we saw any real competition. But so is any was one another. One was swift. Oh, out of New York. Who was there before we were Clearly people like dog, vacay and Rover were around. They were more focused on the dog sitting and sort of overnight care. But Swift was very much in the dog walking space and housing e and we had a head to head competition and they chose to spend a lot of their money, I think Maura outdoor, uh, you know, like running broadcast ads. And they sort of went all into the awareness campaigns. And we were more focused on, like things that we could make attribution Thio like Facebook acquisition and promotions. And, like much mawr, sort of direct engagement campaigns, email campaigns. And so, you know, we we had a really hard fought battle with them, and within a year they were out of business because they just couldn't get that flywheel. There's turning. I don't think they had enough like direct touch points. They were going more broad, and we were much more focused. We also offered out of the gate this this lockbox, which for us was like the gateway to the consumer because one of the biggest hesitations to using this is going to trust and safety and getting access to the home when no one's there. And so we were out of the gate sort of innovating by just giving someone a lockbox for free. And then in the app, we had all the instructions on, like what? The key combination waas. And that ended up being a department that I lead later on which became like the post office inside of Wag. We had, um you know, hundreds or thousands of these lockboxes going out every day, and we knew we couldn't walk that dog until that lockbox was there. So we were trying to make it as efficient as possible That, like when you signed up, you got that lockbox as soon as possible, because then you could start using the product s so we had to have that as sort of a. We had to have that step there first before you could really unlock the value of the product. And so because of those things we beat out singing in L A pretty quickly swift dough is still around in New York, they never really scale it. Outside of that, I'm not. I also think that was their ambition, but for us, like I said when I met with my partners, I want to have the biggest dog walking company in the world, and I believe that we achieve that. Um And then how do you create a competitive advantage and unique selling prop? You know, you have to talk to your customers. You have Teoh talk to your at a marketplace. You talk to both your supply and demand side and make sure that you're making a, um, valuable connection for both of those people and making the job easier. And the and the value greater for the consumer and the dog walker as well. And, um, you know, it also helps to be able to be in the position to raise additional capital so you can keep that paid acquisition channel running so that you're also keeping that word of mouth going. As I mentioned before, so you can get Thio, you know, get to scale and at scale these things. You have the opportunity to really just like game change your business model. Um, if you could get if you could get there.

What were the major exciting and memorable moments? Were there also any moments that almost got you to quit? How did you get past them?

Based on experience at: Co Founder, Chief Dog Officer and 1st CEO, Wag Labs Inc.
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Yeah, lots of major, exciting and memorable moments, right? I mean, our first launching in the APP store for the first time, right, Right around New Year's Christmas time of 2014, beginning of 15 and then, you know, seeing our first dog walk and one of the early issues that we had. I remember in L. A. We had an issue where one of the dog walkers couldn't get the dog back in the crate and we said a few of our best dog walkers. But because I had all this experience, my own dog walking company, I was like, I'm just gonna go there. And so I go there and I devised, like, this whole, um, tactic with using treats and like using my belt on the on the crate and eventually getting a dog close enough with treats, luring him into the crate. But I could then spring my trap toe, lock the door behind him and get the dog secured. And you know, plenty of moments like that where, you know, also just, you know, seeing the team scale and starting to meet really, really smart, great people that I hadn't we hadn't worked with in the past, like getting around some of those folks like somebody's engineers, people in marketing, people in growth, like learning from these people. The designer, uh, everything the team is what made everything very memorable and moments almost quitting. Yeah, tons, Tons. Right, Um, that first year, working like I said, like, seven days a week for the whole year. My previous company, as I mentioned Surf Dog. It was a lifestyle business and created it to get away from the computer and spend more time outside. And now here I was just like staring at a computer screen in meetings all day, working seven days a week and a high pressure situation. Um, but my my partner, she, like, you know, kept me, kept me going and my daughter, when she was born with a lot of motivation to keep seeing things through because the progress was progressing. Um, you know, we had to deal with some situations with dogs. You know, uh, when people walk dogs at scale like eventually, you know, things happen that are out of our control and dealing with those situations directly and with parents who have had, you know, to deal with loss as a pet parrot like those are conversations you don't wanna have with anybody, right? Um, in particular is a business, you know, as a as a partner in the business with when you're consumers. Like all these moments became very, very hard to withstand over the long haul. And the only way you can get past them is just, you know, taking in that moment and just thinking about how much value you're actually creating and all the stuff that's happening right now You think? Okay, five years from now, um, I going to, you know, I want to think that this moment got me to quit doing what I love and what I believe in, like or five years from now am I going to think, Oh, my God. Like that was an amazing experience. How much did I learn from that? How much did I did? I grow from that. And so I think it was about a perspective, you know, Especially when you could find a way to put yourself five years ahead. And what you would think about the moment that you're in right now. If you're looking back, that moment would be looked at as almost like to sublet. Then you should probably just you just deal with it and move on. And if your body is telling you your mind's telling you that this is something that five years from now you're never gonna forget, then then maybe you should reconsider.

What responsibilities and decisions do you handle? What are the top three priorities and pain points? What strategies are effective in dealing with challenges?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
mhm. Yeah, I've actually, uh, shuttered scoot TV. I'm working on a new start up right now. That's in stealth mode, but screw TV was a great was a great challenge. Um, I was an opportunity. What screw TV was was a O T. T platform that was trying to bring in the ability of the sharing economy like the gig economy, to renting videos. The concept was that could this be the first gig economy for the couch potato, right. If I am really knowledgeable in the film space, can I rent a movie, watch it and then basically pitch it out to my friends and sell it to them at sort of a discount? But, um, and I would be rewarded for selling as many copies as you could. So it's almost like you're managing. You're you're managing your own, uh, movie studio, in a sense, um, and so, yeah, I was the CEO of that company. Way ran about a year and lots of responsibilities, right? You have to again build the product, work with your dev team, get we had to secure content, which was a real hassle for us. We had meetings with, like fox and Disney and, you know, some of the other networks. And I was an outsider to that space, which gave me a big which gave me great vision because I wasn't in the space I was looking at from the outsider. And so I saw these, like, interesting opportunities toe to reshape that industry. Um, but then the inner workings, or how you and how you secure content and work with these studios that became a pain point for us. And so we had to bring in someone who had that experience to help us form these contracts and do these deals. Um and so I think the top three priorities and pain points for us. It was, um, build the product, secure the content and, um, sort of e mean, obviously raise capital is always an issue for any early startup. I believe that the top three and they all have their own pain points and, um, strategies effective in dealing with the challenges. Just again being willing to just go hard every single day, do your best to keep the team motivated and engaged in and with a clear vision of what you're building. And, uh, yeah, that's that's what I tried to dio

What college programs did you attend and what were their best parts? How did each of your college programs prepare you for your career?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
our cool question. Yeah. So I went to Arizona State University go sun Devils and studied business and psychology, and I had a lot of great programs. One of my favorites actually was a outdoor survival program where we go, like, into the wilderness and create homes out of nothing But what's there like using sticks and pine cones and things like that and learning how thio, you know, set traps and you know how toe follow a topographic map and all those kinds of survival skills. I thought that was just the most fun course. Um, ever, I would have some great psychology courses with some really, um, famous instructors like Robert Corradini, who wrote the book, uh, influence how to influence people. That was a very impactful book for me. Um, also just against great, just friendly great friends and all that experience and how do they prepare me for your career? I mean, I use my psych degree and my business background every single day. I couldn't survive this industry without it, especially when I was working with the dog side, right? Like I think, the dog psychology, um, understanding how the human brain works and what drives us, motivates us. I was able to apply that sometimes two dogs when I was walking them are responsible for them. And it it made my job easier understanding, you know, rewards and how to just look at the environment and, you know, try to navigate certain problems and issues. But yeah, I think it really did prepare me my college experience for what I'm doing now and then, you know, it's like a snowball. The more you do what you're doing, you learn stuff outside of college that gets stuck to something you learned in college. And now all of a sudden, you know, your synapses fire and like, Oh, I get why that was being taught to me back then because I'm dealing with some things like this right now. And I have, um a bit of, ah, crutch to lean on. I could go do more research on this now, but some of the basic frameworks already already in there already learned this once before. Now you need to learn learning a little bit more toe master. It

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? If any, please also discuss your experiences facing adversity, or trying something unusual.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
Um, I don't know. There's a lot, but I think the three that sort of stick out is to be successful, you have to have the three. The three p's right, lots of passion. You have to be so passionate about what you're doing and what you're working on, that no external factor is going to get you to stop doing what is your working on? So if you're really passionate, that's a good start. Um, you have to be persistent, right? Persistence is key because there's going to be a lot of barriers. There's gonna be a lot of hiccups, a lot of, you know, landmines externally and internally with your team, with family members with friends. But you just have to be able to stay persistent and just keep working on it because you know what you're doing. Um, needs to exist. And then, um, I think professionalism, right, like you need to, like, build up those skills. You have to be a professional and you have tow. It's okay if you're not a professional out of the gate, but be willing to learn and grow and have conversations with people and seek out professionals that you can learn from. So again, if you could have those 3 ft, there's three piece off passion, persistence and professionalism. I think you have a very successful career.there's adversity and every day, right? You have, you know, working with a new team member, someone that you don't really know, how they think and what their thoughts are on something, and especially if they're new and they're coming into your established business right where you have your set ways and wasting things should be, you need to. You should go into that conversation the first time you have a new hire and ask them what they think And really try to understand if they're seeing your business, your your company, your structure, the team differently than you are, because this is the best opportunity to learn from that person. But that's gonna It's gonna be tough. You have to create the environment where the new person feels comfortable telling, Ah, very older senior person what they think is is wrong, right, or or anything out of place or what they really like and what they really like about your business, you may not necessarily like, but taking that sort of criticism and and understanding that feedback, Um, I think that's something that maybe I do. That may not be there's a little bit unusual, but I get a lot of value in it.

What starting job (after internship) would you recommend to students who hope to grow professionally like you? What other parting advice, dos, and don'ts would you give?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Wed Nov 11 2020
I think. What? Starting job after industry would you recommend students who hope to grow professionally? I really hope people try and start their own business. And it doesn't necessarily have to be a venture backed technology company, Right? Like my first company was just a dog walking company. And I eventually leverage technology to improve upon it and then eventually ended up running a technology company. But the learnings I learned by just being responsible for my own business are I could ask for It's such a great opportunity. Right? Um but I guess for me, though, the more I think about it is that came to me after already worked in Fortune 500 companies already worked in startups. So maybe that actually really helped me when I was ready to go out on my own. Um, so, yeah, I mean, I guess to answer this question, just, you know, just always be moving forward, right? You can still work and try to get hired at a company doing sales, working in the bottom, working in the middle, um, and work on your own companies on the side. You get a ton of value by working with someone that has experienced, but then also working on your own and figuring it out on your own. So, um, yeah, I'm not sure of that, Really answered the question, but I think if you guys want to grow professionally, learn from people, so work within a structure where you have a leader but then also work on your own things so that you learn how thio do those things yourselves without that leadership and problem solving on your own, I think those were nice a nice balance that you could You could make that work for yourself. And then what parting advice do is, would you give? Um, yeah, I think, you know, be willing to take some risks right and bet on yourself. It's always worth it to bet on yourself when it comes to your professional career, whether that's spending on yourself and spending more time in school, or betting on yourself and starting your own company, or betting on yourself and taking a job across the country in a place where you're unfamiliar because you're just really excited about what that company is doing. Eso You shouldn't be afraid to take those. Take that risk and what you shouldn't. Dio is, um never stop learning. Right? Keep trying to, um, be willing to learn new things. Um, new approaches and all different facets of life. Not just professionally, but personally as well.