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How did you get to where you are today? What is your story? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
All right. Here we are. Sure, I have a perhaps non-traditional path towards working technology. I graduated college with a degree in economics, totally unrelated. But I was not super interested in my own degree at the time because I felt that was much less applicable. I don't run the Fed or anything, so I don't, I can't implement economic policy immediately, which is part of why I became interested in programming because since I learned something, I could actually carry it out. I could use it that day. So I am self-taught. After college, I sort of wandered around a bit physically. I traveled to South East Asia and wanted to do some language learning and just sort of figure out what to do next. And along that path, I've found programming because it's a great way to make a living while you're living abroad or living in your own country. But for me, I was living abroad at the time, so I just read a lot of blog posts, a lot of books about programming. I started with PHP and moved onto Ruby. I started working as a contractor, running my own business, and that just spiraled into essentially my life for two to three years, and after that I really wanted to become an engineer as opposed to someone who just, you know, cobbled together pieces of J-Queries or pieces of PHP to make a web application. So what I did was I came, I moved back from Asia to San Francisco, did a job search for about three months. I found a job at an, extremely small start up as the first employee, and I just jumped at the opportunity. I really wanted to be extremely impactful, which is what you get when you do any company that doesn't have anyone else to do the job. So I did that and I actually just left that job within the last three months or so. So for about four years, I was working as the software engineer in San Francisco and throughout all of that, let's just call it seven years of programming, being technical. I did a lot of open source because it's just fun because I like the interplay between different developers around the world. You get to share ideas, you could see other people's code and people get to see your code and you just all get better at the same time. So that is perhaps a bit more for both than I intended. But that's my story.

What lead you to contribute to this open-source project? What challenges did you come across while working on this project? What approaches helped you in overcoming some of the challenges?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Maintainer, Timezone detection for Javascript (JSTZ)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Well, JSTZ is a sort of a non-case because it's a fork, sort of a fork. It's an unofficial fork where what I needed at one point in my programming career was I needed to tell what the time zone in the browser was. But for anyone who has worked with timezones in Javascript probably knows there didn't used to be a standard way to do this. And there is a standard way now, but it's still not supported all the way back to probably the first version of IE that you needed to support. So time zone detection is something that is a bit of a problem, and I ended up finding a library that did it, but it didn't work with the tools, it didn't work with the webpack and just important thing left and right into my overall code base. So I forked it right over to Github, on to the bucket, added, put it on to the MPM ecosystem and then sort of maintained it. Even that wasn't even intentional for this particular project. The maintenance of it just came about because I used it in production and apparently other people needed to because I ended up getting issues and code contributions, and it just turned into a very, very small but, a semi active project of mine.

How did working on this open-source project help you with your career prospects? What are your criteria for accepting any job or consultancy offers?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Maintainer, Timezone detection for Javascript (JSTZ)
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Two good questions. The open source. This is not an uncommon question for people that use Github and are interested in working as software engineers. The way I would say open source help most is simply by making you better at your craft. It's not, in my opinion, the most effective means of advertising yourself for getting your name out there. If you create a really one of libraries like, let's say you're the first person to write React, which was implemented within Facebook. And that's a bad example. But Moment.JS or J-Query or any of these extremely well known libraries. If you're that person that could put your name behind a library that has hundreds of thousands of people using it, then it's great exposure. But it's very rare. It's just like being famous in any realm of life. So I would recommend against using open source specifically for promoting oneself. I would use open source to get better at one's craft and simply because you enjoy what you do. Those are the reasons for me, and if along the way you happen to get a lot of exposure, that's all the better but it doesn't, at least in my experience translate into myriad job offers coming in your inbox. To the second point, criteria for accepting a job offer. This one, I believe, is just very personal. What does any individual person want out of their job. As for me when I asked myself this question, the answer was extremely high impact and a lot of opportunity to learn, which is why I joined, at the time when I accepted an offer by a small startup, I also had an offer from a much larger company at the same time, which was also, they also offered me twenty percent more base salary. But the reason I chose the tiny startup was because of my initial criteria, which was extremely high impact and a lot of opportunities to learn. So for anyone else trying to generalize the advice, that's what you want from the job. If you want a very significant paycheck and that's the main criteria try to work at Google or Facebook or Netflix or one of the giants. If you want a lot of opportunity to improve very quickly and extremely high impact, try to find much smaller company or consultancy, where you can do essentially whatever you think is best, where you're not going to have layers and layers of existing decision makers that you have to pass through in order to make a decision. Go for something smaller. That would be my advice.

What were the responsibilities and decisions that you handled at work? What were your working hours like?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Um, let's see, I'll start with responsibilities and decisions. So when I first started, I was the first employee. But they also had another person working there as a consultant who later became a full time employee. So we simply had two engineers on the job, writing all the codes. And because of our existing skill sets, it worked out where I knew, we were building the webapp for context, and my experience, my existing experience was very well suited to building the front end, writing a lot of JavaScript, C++, HTML and the other person's experience was very well suited to running the back end. He was a Java developer with a lot of experience in that field. So we ended up sort of organically forming this split where I would write the front end, he would write the back end and there's a team of two. There was very little overhead in terms of our coordination. We would just, you know, swivel chairs around and start talking to each other about whatever feature you need to get implemented and then swivel back and start building it. So in terms of the responsibilities and decisions I was responsible for. it was simply everything related to what the users see, which meant designing, doing the graphic design, to design what the interface is gonna look like and implementing the interface and making all the decisions around. How do we build a web app, you know, it's supposed to act like an app it's supposed to be very quick, very instant, just like any native app running on your computer, Tthen how do you architect a complex web application that runs in the browser. Those were, that was my primary decision making pathway and then to the hours. So I'll reiterate, I worked at a small start up, which is perhaps not the common case. I worked, some weeks, it would be out there roughly eighty hours a week, and some weeks we would be, that was, that was not the most common case. But it did happen. This is, no one was grinding me there, I will say it would be me pushing myself because I wanted to meet a deadline because I felt so deeply that I was having an impact on this company. But more often than not, it was more of forty or fifty hours a week, which will probably sound much more familiar to anyone who's been in the industry before. There's not like a stereotypical career track in law or finance. We're expected to work extreme hours, and it's fairly normal. And I should also say my experience is all in the San Francisco bay area, so I don't know what other markets are like in terms of work.

What tools (software programs, frameworks, models, algorithms, languages) did you use at work? Did you prefer certain tools more than the others? Why?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Yeah, so yeah, my stack ended up being a lot of React, a lot of Redux and a lot of JS, so observable data type. But it doesn't after necessarily the arc stairs, although that implementation I used but that was those together made the stack that ended up working for me. I tried different stuff, as I programmed over the years, like at backend, one that I used quite a bit is rails. When I was doing backend stuff, and I used PHP as well. There was Wordpress when I very first started, but not sure what else they use now. What I ended up with much later on was for service side stuff I would write it in Node and express and for the clients side, React with some Redux and Observables, ark stairs, for handling all side effects, including asynchronous data fetching and dom manipulation if it was needed, which it wasn't usually, could react or interacting with local storage like that. And the reason I sort of I came to this overtime, and what I found was eventually I settled on these technologies that worked well enough together to solve any problem I had, I sort of stopped looking. Early in my career, I was just trying every new framework I could get my hands on, and that very much stopped once I found a tool chain that really worked for all the problems I was running into, and I just stopped and I stopped reading the JavaScript newsletters. I stopped trying out any new repository on Github. All of that came to an end. Once I had a solution that worked in a general enough sense that I didn't have to go out and find new stuff very often, and that was very nice. Anyone who is new to the JavaScript scene, you're probably one of the two things either extremely overwhelmed, or extremely excited and I was extremely excited. After a time that it can just become overwhelming, because at the end of the day, most of us are trying to run production code and trying on new libraries in production, ends up being a pretty, pretty bad idea most of the time. So do I prefer certain tools more than other and why? I'll just start with the reason why the answer is Yes. The reason why goes back to sort of what I just said, you don't want to constantly be re-evaluating new tools when you're trying to move forward in the context of a business. If you're just building things to improve your craft, be better at programming or you could be like building things it is a different story. But if you work in a company or running your own, you likely want to push something forward beyond simply writing more lines of code or experimenting with new frameworks. And so finding a tool that works for you and then sticking to it helps with that. It also helps scale a team. So in the context of a business, constantly experimenting, although it can be very fun is generally not the best idea.

What things did you like about your job? Were there any pleasant surprises?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
I don't know about surprises. A lot of it was very pleasant. I suppose I wasn't very surprised. I was surprised when I first started. One of my first assignments as a software engineer and as a first employee of the startup was to help assemble all the furniture of the IT department. We'd just got an office, so that was a surprise. It was also quite a lot of fun because we were just team bonding. Of course, it had nothing to do with engineering, so my experience was very much a small company level camaraderie. Sort of like you were just working with friends and that grand ambition you have.So, what I like most about my job, the sort of reason why I joined ended up being spot on. I wanted to have a lot of impact and I wanted to be able to make a lot of decisions, and on both of those points, I got exactly what I wanted so I really like being able to take decisions, both in terms of product direction and in terms of technical decisions like what frameworks and technologies should be used. I enjoy that a lot. I also enjoy seeing things we ship to our customers, seeing the products that I had a major role in building being used by actual people. To me, it was the impact. The impact and the decision making, both are extremely important to me.

What were the job titles of people you routinely work with? What strategies or approaches did you find to be effective in working with them?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
To reiterate being at a start up, especially when they're small, titles are much less significant, not because they're meaningless, but because everyone sort of does everything. You could be junior software engineer or engineering manager, and you may end up doing the exact same type of stuff because there's just stuff that needs to get done. So that being said titles didn't play a huge role in my software engineering career in San Francisco. But the working with other people. So at first I think there's an interesting question because for anyone who works at a larger company, you're going to experience this immediately. If anyone who works in a smaller company, you're going to experience it over time. Initially, for me, I was working with just engineers, and the founders and the founders weren't engineers. But they just gave complete autonomy to the engineering department to make all these decisions because they were nontechnical themselves. So initially it was essentially a very small group of engineers working together toward a common goal. So it was, there was almost zero friction in any of our decision making. We all valued making logical decision. So when we disagreed, we just discussed pros and cons specially in the context of a larger business, and we would really come to a solution later on. Later on, it became more difficult simply because you get more people. So it's because if you're playing telephone, sometimes you say, this to person A, they say something to person B, person B says something to person C and person C comes to you with essentially the same thing you told person B. Somehow it gets garbled into a completely different product feature, or they're just they imagine the problem that didn't exist or something along those lines. There's a lot of opportunity for miscommunication or information to fall off when you're working with when you increase the number of people. So I would say communication, the effectiveness of communication goes down as a function of n when n is the number of people in the organization, but large companies seemed to make it work just fine. So my experience in a small company that was growing and trying to make this work better is probably not indicative of the overall industry. Well, we would just experiment along with how can we work as the team, so I end up using a lot of tools. We used things like Trello and at the time when I left, that was what we were doing. We were using software solutions to help us align everyone on the overall mission, which was still a common mission. But it was harder to get everyone to understand the mission from the same perspective because they were from a different background.

What major challenges did you face in your job? Can you discuss a few accomplishments, and challenges that you overcame and felt proud of?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Challenges that I overcame and felt proud of. Yeah, for me initially largest challenge was simply becoming better as going from being like I mentioned earlier, being someone who just kind of cobbles together scripts from around the web into an application to being someone who actually build an architect, an application. And though that challenge was ongoing, there was no one moment where I felt that this challenge had been overcome. Although after a year on the job, when I look back, I could see how different I did think that point in the year earlier and that happened after two years with a year points and after three years, I again look back and I thought, wow, two years ago, what the world was I doing, I know so much more now? But there was no, there was no one accomplishment that really spoke to me and said, now you understand a lot more about what it means to be an engineer. The accomplishment and challenges. To point one, to bring up one example, I would say part of the product that we're building involved a lot of graphic realization and graphic relation and even graph theory. Underlying all of it is, these are things that I didn't know anything about. So in order to create this product that had a meaningful graph visualization component involved a lot of learning about both graph from a computer science perspective and what they are and what they can accomplish, as well as learning about how you visualize them in a browser or in a software in general. So we did, of course, end up shipping a product that has a very significant graphing component and but it took definitely months of effort, and a lot of, a lot of learning on my part.

What was the hiring process like for your job? What were the roles of people who interviewed you? What questions were asked and how did you answer them?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Good question. I'll tell you about my my particular job and maybe touch on other interview questions I got at other jobs which either I didn t get offer from or I didn't myself accept. Again, my small company might have been a bit different. So for the company I joined, when I was joining and it was just founders, all of the interviewing was very, you could say, behavioral interview, perhaps. But it is just very soft, about getting to know you as a person. There were no technical question. The underlying question behind everything that the founders were asking me was, do we like this person? Do we think we can work with them day in and day out because they could be the first person we hire? It's not like you hire someone at a larger company, and they're just in their department, and you never see them here. You're working together with present day in and day out. So you really want to think that you work good together, and that's what they were trying to answer for themselves. And, of course, they wanted to know if I knew what I was talking about. But they weren't really well qualified to beat me in that respect. So they took a chance, and we both benefit in the end. At larger companies, though, there are certainly a lot of technical questions. If anyone who intends to go work in the bay area, I think you're going to invariably run into a whole lot of technical questions and they vary greatly and what they're going to ask you. So any CS student who is either got an internship or gone into industry or is thinking about doing it may well be familiar with the kind of questions they ask. There are a lot of CS style puzzle like questions where no, it's like the question that was asked at a company to which, shortest path finding algorithms are very relevant were like, let's say you have a starting point here and you have a two dimensional graph and you want to get there, and there are certain obstacle that you know these coordinates on a graph. How do you calculate getting, going over there and so you just need to be able to enter that in terms of the algorithm, the most efficient resolve that and then there are also a lot of questions about great, you have a solution, tell me about how efficient that is in terms of time, complexity and can we make it more efficient? Which is most often where the interviews get really difficult because you often can make something more efficient. But it's not immediately obvious how to do it, even if you have formal training in algorithm.

What qualities did your team look for while hiring? How did your team interview candidates?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
What interview people for, generally, that sort of divide, maybe front end or maybe back end still existed throughout my time there. So if you were interviewing someone on the front end, I would be responsible to ask the technical questions. And so I would ask them things like what the, I would ask them to build essentially, like an event planner and event aggregator that they could use to to help architect a larger app like a pub-sub pattern. Or if they were more backend candidate then our chief backend engineer would be responsible for most of the technical questions. And so the other side of that is, whoever was not responsible for the technical stuff would try to get that sense of would I like to work with this person there. There's an idea that exists, I think it was the term might have been coined on a stripe of a t-shirt, but this idea of, Sunday test, which is simply if this person who we might hire was in the office on a Sunday, would I be more or less likely to come into the office. So asking yourself that is trying to get at evidently, how much do I like this person after you know, these thirty minutes that we have talked together and it's not always an easy answer, but that's what those of us weren't asking the technical questions were trying to suss out.

What were some future career path(s) after that job? What skills, certificates, or experiences did you plan on acquiring?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Good question, onto the first part. The software engineering track, at least in San Francisco or the Bay area at large looks generally sort of this. From what I think it looks sort of like this, you start at a small or mediums size company with generally a good amount of autonomy, and then after one, two, three years, you leave and join another company around the same size. And then after that, you leave and join an extremely large company. And so the people I've seen, it happens a lot where people sort of worked their way up to working at Google or Facebook. And at that point, for anyone who end up working at Google or Facebook, the passage, the one essential passage simply stay there. Your pay is obviously quite good, and the longer you stay, the more you get, and also the more equity you get. So there's this. For anyone who wants to just own house and sort of family, that is a totally viable option already. But a lot of people go even further and they say, okay, well, I want to start actually investing in Startups so that's the next step, often on the silicon valley engineer track is either start your own company or start investing on the side in companies of your friends or people you just meet through whatever social circles you created. And then after that, of course, you're either a successful investor or is it a successful founder? That's sort of the upward path in the silicon valley, Bay area. I left not because that path is unappealing, but because I was not entirely sure that I wanted to embark on the next leg of that path at this time. I have done four years well, three and a half, almost four years of engineering at one company, and I was just ready to try something different. So what skills or experience do you plan on acquiring next? That's a good question. I'm, I consider myself on sabbatical and that is a euphemistic term for just trying to figure out what I want to do next. I would say the thing that a lot of that you get enough in engineering is you get a fair degree of job security, and I don't just mean in terms of while you have that job. If you leave the industry and come back, you likely can come back. There's a lot that one could miss out on. Technology moves very fast, but a lot of the fundamental skills and your resume will still look good if you come back later. So for anyone who is going to go into the industry, you don't have to go into it and then stay until you're sixty. You can dip in and out or go into industries that are adjacent, such as starting your own company. You're going into product management or going into any other aspect that goes into running a business. Because every technology business is still just a business.

What were various starting positions and salaries in your domain? What were the typical career paths after these starting positions?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : Senior Software Engineer, TruSTAR Technology
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Starting position salaries, the starting positions would be software engineer, junior software engineer. I think those are probably the two most common titles. The junior may or may not come with the position, depending on where you're going and in here in the Bay area, that salary range, I would say from what I've seen, is around eighty thousand to Hundred twenty thousand for the the entry level software engineer. And that's what can generally be expected by anyone coming straight out of college as well. So typical career path to get there is usually get a CS degree in college, get an internship at a tech company during your junior year. They're going to give you an offer for the next year, and then you're just, you're in the industry. Or alternatively, just having a degree in computer science is is enough to usually get the interview. And then you're just practicing interviewing, which is a skill set unto itself. So for any college student, the path is, the most clear path is get a degree and go from there. But as I did, you don't have to have a CS degree, great. If you don't, you'll just have to find another way to get people intrigued in your resume. So for me, that was doing a lot of projects, consulting projects. So I got paid to build things for client. And those projects I put on my resume, and that demonstrated that. Okay, this guy's built products. And most positions in software engineering, at least in terms of scope area, are for building some sort of product. So that worked out as well. Yeah.

What prompted you to pick this program? What other programs or Universities did you consider? What did you like about the program?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : BA, Economics, Pomona College
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
So for brief intro to that college, it's a very small liberal arts college. The total student body, at least when I was there, was about fifteen hundred students. It's all undergrad. So one of the reasons I really liked that it was small, and I didn't necessarily wanted a small college, but I wanted small classes, so you usually have to get those two together. You don't go to a thirty thousand person school and get small classes. So because I wanted small classes, this was an extremely attractive university to me. Then, of course, there's the fact that it's in California. It's in essentially a desert, but because it's well irrigated there, it's just a beautiful, almost oasis like place in the middle of the east of LA, is still in LA county. It's just it's all dry and barren and then there's the beautiful campuses, Pomona college in particular. It also is nestled up against four other colleges. So instead of just having fifteen hundred students total, it's more around five thousand. So in terms of, there are five colleges total together, and not only can you have social circle that spans five colleges, but you can go and attend classes. So one of the other colleges there is Harvey Mudd, which is really well known for engineering and their computer science program is very well respected, so someone is going to Pomona or any of the other college want to take a Pomona class and you can just take classes at any of these colleges. So I thought it was just phenomenal. The best, the best mix of all the things I wanted in a college. Anyway, that being said it was not a given that I would get in, of course, so I applied. I applied to stanford, did not get in, applied to UCLA, did get in, and in the end, it really just came down to find a few more. But it came down to those two in the LA or Pomona, and I chose Pomona for all those reasons that has said a small but a lot of students, and they also had financial aid because they are a private college

How did the program prepare you for your career? (This may include courses, advising, career resources, career events, class visits, networking and so on).

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
for : BA, Economics, Pomona College
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
There's a good question. And I would say through no fault of Pomona, I was largely unprepared when I left college. And I think that is much more who I was and my interests at the time rather than the college that they went to and from people that I know, my own experience and friends that I've, had exactly, often the case, people graduate college, and they're just not ready. I wasn't ready and that's okay. So I would say to this question that it's actually fine to not be ready. You can prepare all you want, but you still, might will in fact, likely encounter situations that your college life did not prepare you for and that's okay. But in terms of career preparedness, what I found was simply having a degree is enough to get most of the interviews you would want. Then, if you want something specific, if you want to work in finance or management, consulting or law or whatnot, then the career path is to get an internship at some point during your four years and move from that into your first position in that industry. And from there you have a lot of mobility, but that first rung can be difficult to get. And one of the things that drew me to software engineering was that that first rung isn't set in stone. It isn't vital that you have a specific degree or some list of degrees. In addition to a specific internship or multiple internship that led you into your first position and in software engineering, all of that helps. All of that can certainly work fine, but you can also come in with any degree as long as you have the requisite experience, because you're gonna demonstrate that experience in ways that you can't have readily demonstrate if you were interviewing for a management position. There's no upper management where I can go and see that even how to manage people. But with software engineering, you generally can or someone on your team can go that way pretty quickly. So yeah, they're capable, at least at a baseline, and you can go from there.

Do you have any parting advice for young professionals? Is there anything you would have done differently in your life?

Asked by Jeff Musk

Ian Sinnott

Economics, BA, Pomona College
San Francisco, CA, USA
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Dec 10 2018
Really a good question. I'm very satisfied with the way things have gone so far. I did a lot of self exploration along the way, and I'm doing more of that now. But all of that exploration definitely led to things that were very beneficial later. For anyone in college or coming out of college, I think there's this, it's like a sort of like, explore, exploit, dilemma, where how much do you explore but how much you exploit the knowledge you already have and the younger you are, especially in college. Clearly, you want to do a whole lot of exploration. What I found, and of course, I am a little biased here, is that seeking exploitation immediately after college might be a bit premature for a lot of people. I think there could be a lot of value gained by still exploring your various interests unless you, some people really do know, you really know what you want to spend the next decades of your life doing. But that's not the case for everyone and that's not anything that you should feel ashamed of or even resist. Just if you're not sure what you want to do, try other things even if you're already out of college. It's not too late to try other things that might eventually lead you to what you do. It did for me, considering I had no idea that I was going to do after graduating college. But it ended up being very, very fun, very exciting and very beneficial. So to sum it up, I would say don't worry too much about it. Just pursue things aggressively, but without worry. Thank you.

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