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How did you get to where you are today? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path? What inspired you to start your training institute?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
Well, let's say that there's a few different factors in how I arrive where I am. I'm the co founder of a software developer boot camp, and we make computer programmers. You can walk in the door not knowing anything about computers and a few months later, walk out the doors and entry level working computer programmer in a variety of technical disciplines. And here's how I got here. I mean, the short version is that I learned computer programming in early age because my dad was really, really smart. He brought one of the first personal computers home in the early eighties and didn't just show me how to use it. But he unplug it, unscrewed the back and showed me all the parts and how they worked. So from an early age, I understood the physical hardware of a computer. What the CPU is, what all the connections are inside, how it interacts with, you know, input output devices, peripherals of all sorts. And so there was never any real strong mystery about what a computer was just in terms of the machine. Then, later on in the Navy, I got a much stronger education in computer architecture electron, ICS and engineering and and learn to program. So those were the seeds of it in terms of how I ended up, like working in the computer boot camp space. Because technology boot camps are relatively new, they only started up around 2012 right as a viable method for breaking into the computer programming industry. In terms of how I got started with that, I had already been sort of tutoring people on the side because I would pull inside work as a developer. I'm working software developer, So I pull inside jobs, and I want to be able to farm out some of the work to junior developers. And I found it was really, really hard to find junior developers. And so I started just tutoring people. So my friends were really bright. And about that time I heard for the first time for my son actually about boot camps. This is early 2013. Boot camps had just started in the San Francisco Bay Area the summer before, and I heard about him and it just all came together. I went, Wow, I love computers. I know how to explain them in simple ways to people. Um, I like teaching, and I have personal reality on how hard it is to break into the industry and to find quality entry level talent. So I said, I guess I'll start a boot camp and I found a good co founder to start it with me. He was an expert at the business development End of things, and we just rolled with it. And that's become the tech Academy, which has been around since. Like I say, 2013 is one of the best boot camps in the world. So that's a bit of background on where I came from and what motivates me. I really want to break down the barriers between the average person and technology. I don't think this should be such a huge barrier to entry for someone to one. Be a knowledgeable user of technology and, more importantly, to to be ableto control technology, to understand programming, to be able to understand what's underneath the hood so that they can use technology from a position of power instead of being a slave to it and using it unknowingly, if you know what I mean

What training programs and courses do you offer? How much time is spent on in-person and online classes in a week? How many weeks do students typically take to complete?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
Well, at this point, the Tech Academy has 11 different boot camps covering subjects such as just plain old Web development C sharp python. Um, you know, security. Um, you know, front and JavaScript developer data science, like there's a lot of different boot camps. Right? So we have I said 11 different boot camps in terms of the balance between in person online. Well, this is being recorded in November of 2020. So we're in the age of coronavirus. So right now, all of our training is being done online when we're not in the age of coronavirus and people can actually come into our campuses. We found that most you know, about 60% of our students really value and impersonal experience, and they'll do some or all of their training in one of our campuses. We have campuses in Portland, Oregon, and in in Denver, Colorado. Eso that works out just great for about 60%. Ah, full 40% of our students are 100% remote, and again right now, they're all remote because of what we have going on. But in our you know, historically, 40% of the people just want a remote or fully online experience, which means we have students all over the world in terms of how many weeks do students typically take when we have a rather unique model in that we are self paced, we don't have everyone start on the exact same day and move in lockstep through their training. Instead, you can move, you know, you move it your own page so you can move rather quickly through the, you know, subjects that you happen to know pretty well or they're going well for you. But the flip side of that is really great because if you run into something that you're kind of hung up on and you can't quite understand and you need a little bit more help, you might take a little bit longer than that. But on average, change your question on average for, say, a full stack boot camp like our C sharp boot camp or are Python boot camp. It could take between four and seven months to complete that you can do it part time, in which case it might take you the full six or seven months. You could do it full time, in which case you probably finish it in about four months, and every once in a while we have someone that just really takes advantage of the fact that it's self paced and does a super intensive schedule 50 60 70 hours a week and then finish in three months, three or four months. At the end of that You are full stack working developer, you know you can. You can be part of a dev team. We have an excellent job placement. You know, of course, that helps people, you know, look for jobs. But to answer your question between three and seven months, depending upon which program and how quickly you get through it, which depends on how much time you put into it.

What process do you follow for creating and updating courses? How do you ensure the relevance of topics and material covered?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
Well, let's look at that first question process for creating and updating courses will look at that separately in terms of creating courses that really has to do with having our finger on the pulse of the market and buy the market. I don't just mean on the student acquisition end of it. We do in fact, pay attention to what students are wanting, but it's equally important to us to know what the enterprise wants. You know what the what the hiring managers want and one central aspect of how we've worked over the years, um has some bearing on the answer to all of these questions you just asked, which is that I, as the senior technologist, that the company have been a working software developer through the entire time period that the Tech Academy has been around? And so what that does for me and for the school is it makes it so that I know what's actually being used out in the marketplace. I don't have to make any guesswork. I know you know what's happening with front end Java script development and which frameworks are getting popular and which ones are waning in popularity and which ones might be worth putting into a curriculum because they seem like that's, um, sticking power and which one seems like It's just it's just too early to tell. And so we've been able to be very bright and successful about what courses we create and specifically what technologies technologies. We teach on those courses because because I work in the industry and I watch what happens on a daily and weekly and monthly and yearly basis. So when it comes to creating new courses, we look at what's being asked for by hiring managers, which is part of the reason why we have, you know, a computer security course, because security is massively important and we need many, many more professionals in that area. It's another reason why we have a front end JavaScript developer courses. Because JavaScript has become a first class language, it's no longer just for customizing the behavior of Web pages There are. There's a whole ecosystem there and you have to learn how to operate in that ecosystem. So that's how we you know, I think you know, we work out what courses to create in terms of updating courses is kind of the same question. There's a two part thing, though. There's obviously the fact that I'm working in the industry and I pay a lot of attention to it. But even more importantly, we have a a strongly grooved in line directly from our in students through to the curriculum design team. It runs through instructors, which means that any kind of recommendation or question or, you know, good idea, or what if that anyone has, whether it's a student or instructor about the curriculum gets tow us within hours. And so the curriculum development Team, which I'm a big part of we'll know right away whether you know students are having, you know, difficulty with one particular section of particular course, and we'll be able to step in quickly and change that. Or if there's some new subject that a a large number of students are asking about, we'll be able to see that right away. So our line from our students to the quickly design team is very quick and very easy. It's very easy to tell us what's going on and that also kind of I think, answer is, how do you ensure the relevance of the topics of material covered? It's all wrapped up in what I just described

What criteria do you use to admit students and what are the various student profiles in your programs? What kind of career growth and jobs could students get afterward?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
absolutely. And this is a very personally important answer to me because I meant what I said. Jack Stanley and I, you know where co founders. It's very important to us to break down any kind of barrier There is between the average person and technology. That's an overall mission that we personally have, and it's baked into the company at the Tech Academy. So what does that mean in terms of our admission process? It means that we decided from the beginning that if you are just a reasonably right person who could read, write and do basic math, you should be able to learn to program. And so we we took that on, and we've made the curriculum and the training methodology that we use. Make that riel and it's true if you are reasonably right and you can read, write and do basic math. If you work hard, you can get through a program and be a well rounded entry level developer coming out the other end of it now, in terms of practical implementation, what does that mean? It means that we do an I Q test for everyone, and we have an actual live interaction interview. Just be able to gauge how you know, what's the brightness factor? How willing toe learn are you? So the gate is pretty wide open. The door is pretty wide open. Do well, unlike you. Test like above 100 110 and be able to read, write and do basic math, and you can come right in the door and be part of any one of our programs in terms of the student profiles. Obviously, it's all across the board in terms of what kind of people will sign up for a boot camp. But we see a few general groupings of types of people. The first ones you could say are the young folks and these air you know, young people in their you know, uh, your early twenties kind of time, you know, age range, who have used technology all their lives and are comfortable with it. And they also recognize technology as a valid career path. They know that that's a valid way Thio Good long term career, and they want to short. This one's got quickly. Then we do a lot faster than a four year degree would give them. And so they're willing to put in, you know, a little bit of money upfront and 3 to 7 months of their time in order to break into the industry and then keep on learning afterwards. So it's a young folks. Another really big category is folks who are in their thirties or forties or fifties and have worked in whatever industry they've been in for a long time. But they want to do a career transition, but they don't necessarily want to start from zero and have to get some entry level job. If you're 40 years old, you got a family you're not gonna want to suddenly be making, you know, $10 an hour. You know, you're used to making 60 $70,000 a year or whatever you have done. You wanna be able to find a career. The entrance Ishan, with little to no loss of income and technology, does that for people. The average wage of our graduates in American dollars is about $60,000 a year. That's a great starting wage, and frankly, if you're in your thirties or forties or fifties and you go through one of our boot camps, your average starting wage will probably be higher because you already know how to operate in a corporate environment. You've got years of experience with teamwork and meetings and communication tools and compromise and how to get projects done. All of those skills matter, and they make you a better employee, and so are older. Graduates actually do really well in terms of the wages they get. So that's it for student profiles and finally, turns to career growth and jobs. There's so many jobs and technology Be impossible list all of them. But I will say that our our graduates have successfully worked in some of the following fields, obviously, just strict software development. The vast majority of our graduates just get jobs in software development, but a lot of times they'll go over and do something like, you know, you know, software developer, software development, engineer in test. In other words, they work in the Quality Assurance area as a a testing professional who knows how to code. It's a great role for them. We've had people go into the project management space because they really love working with people and coordinating all the different factors involved in a project. But the fact that they know how to code lets them interact with their development teams. Really, really well, We've had people go into the Dev ops, space development and operations and work at changing the culture of a company and been really successful, so there's a lot of different places they could go at. The core of it is that they understand computers and technology and programming and how software is made and surrounding that group of, you know, body of knowledge. There's a lot of jobs, so there's a lot of routes that people could take in their career.

How do you enable collaboration, social interaction, and comradery among students? Do you use any software, host online or offline events, or follow any processes for this?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
It's a few key things we do one of the things you know, we didn't start up during Kobe times. We've had it for years. There are weekly student round tables that revolve around as a loose concept. You know how to get the job because most of our students are quite concerned with going through the program and landing a job. Why wouldn't they be? By the way, we do have a few students who own technology companies or key executives of technology companies but don't know how to program. And they go through our program. You know, our group camp so they can understand what the company does better. But for the most part, people want a job when they get done with this. So we have these weekly round tables, and we've had them for, you know, five or six years where in general concepts surrounding the job search are discussed. Now that could be a lot of different things. It could be, you know, Hey, let's throw out of coding exercises coding exercise and as a group, all of the attendees will, you know, have one person run point programming and the other people just talk through it, and they collaborate on how it's done. It might be, Hey, listen, let's mock up an actual interview That might happen and what kind of a white board presentation you might have, or some challenging soft skills questions you might be asked, and everybody gets a chance to provide their answer for it. And in those you know, in that meeting, you get to know your fellow students. Even if you're separated by distance or behind time zone, you get to know your fellow students and you learn collaboration skills. Another thing we do those is that towards the end of every single boot camp, there is a two week live project. Some of the boot camps even have multiple two week live projects. But what we do here is we replicate the actual work experience as much as possible. It's a work environment. In other words, you become part of the development team that is working on ongoing maintenance and feature build off an actual piece of software. We have several projects going all the time, internally and externally, and so when you get to the point in your in your training, where you're ready for a live project. You get to work on live software. You do it. You get to do it as part of an agile development team, which means you have to collaborate. You have to interact with all of your fellow developers and with your project manager and whoever is your scrum master. And it's so fantastic because we give people experience what it's gonna be like the first day on the job before they actually arrived on the job. And they can work through any kind of worry or anxiety or questions. They have the number. One question people have Is I just Or they say, I don't feel like I like it all come together for me like all this knowledge I've learned hasn't jelled for me, and I'm scared the first time I've given I'm going to be given a development task. What happens if I embarrassed myself, you know, And so they get to solve that work through it on a riel actual software development project with a real team, and that builds camaraderie like you wouldn't believe in terms of the last part of the question software host online. I'll find events, that kind of thing all of our course work is done, whether you're in campus or your remote in our own proprietary learning management system. And so most of the interaction that students have with other students or the instructors will happen inside that learning management system. But obviously for things like those weekly, you know, roundtables or we have weekly tech talk. So we bring in, you know, in industry Speaker that will all be on a Web conference, and it'll be recorded so that people who miss it can listen to it later on. But there's just it's a wired worlds, the connected world right now, and we're a technology company. So there's a huge number of ways the students to interact with with each other and with the instructors.

How do you support your students for internships or jobs? How do you prepare them for job interviews? How do you provide networking and mentoring opportunities?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
I'm really actually glad you asked this question. I'm referred to it a couple of times that you know how important actually landing the job is. And while no one can really, honestly guarantee your job, here's what it comes down to is the technology of how to find a technology computer programming job and get hired. The skills involved in that are not the skills of programming of computers. It's a separate skill set. So we recognized early on were about six months, you know, into our existence, existence as the company when we came face to face with the fact that if our graduates we're gonna get hired, we had to teach them how to get hired. It wasn't enough to just teach them how to how to program. We had to teach them to get hired, and what came out of that is one of the courses that we're most proud off. It's the last course that everyone does, no matter what boot camp they get from us. They do a job placement course, and that course covers all of the fundamental skills needed in finding and getting a job. And it's not necessarily people things that people walk in the door already knowing. So we covered everything from all the different types of interviews where there's a phone interview, a screening interview, you know, a white board interview, you know, ah, conference, uh, call. Where you asked, Present. We cover all those things and we provide ample opportunity for people to practice all those skills so they don't get blindsided. We cover and things about how to figure out how to dress for the interview. There's an actual technology to that. There's a way to figure out what is the best way to dress, given the exact company you're going to go for a job at, and it's not the same for everyone, and you need to figure out you know what it is. We cover things as simple as hygiene and resume preparation, all the stuff that you would want to know to be well armed not to be a computer programmer. We already handled that earlier in the boot camp, but to be well armed to find ah place that is a good fit for you and the you're a good fit for them and they know that and you know that, and you seal that with employment offer. So we provide a lot to our students. And once you're done with that course, then there is a whole separate area of our company called Job Placement on. We have dedicated job placement specialists who themselves are graduates to the program and understand it inside and out that their whole job five days a week, orm or they worked really hard is just to help our graduates find and secure jobs, and they're incredibly dedicated to it. They have the best job in the whole company. As far as I'm concerned, they get to be there at that moment when one of our graduates gets a job offer and says yes, which is an absolutely fantastic moment, and they get the best, the best part of the entire, the entire thing. So, yeah, we do a lot for that

How do you assist students in paying for your program? What kind of scholarships and financial aid are available for students and how can they avail those?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
completely up to date information on that because it can change from time to time. You really should go to our website. Learn coding anywhere dot com because learn coding anywhere dot com. That's what you'll find completely current data. I will say in general that there's three roughly, you know, three ways that it could be done. There's obviously just pay for it up front, pay for the whole thing, and when you do that, you can get a substantial discount because it makes it a lot easier on everyone involved. Just have tuition paid for right. The second thing is that we are we partner with a few different financing companies. If you wanna be able to pay for it up front, but you don't have the funds yourself. We work with climb. Which is it really well respected? Technology sector Sorry, education sector loan provider. And they do a great job of administering loans since you can work through them. And finally we have a really successful income share agreement, so that means literally don't pay anything upfront. Go through your whole boot camp, go out and get a job, and once you have a job, then over the first year of you working. We'll take a certain percentage of your pay every month to pay for your boot camp. And those have been extremely successful because then the proof is in the pudding. You're like, you know that it was worth going to the boot camp because you landed the job. And only then do you start paying. So there's a lot of different options. But like I said, for totally up to date information, people should go on Thio, you know, learn coding anywhere dot com terms of scholarships. You know, we've occasionally offered things. There's not a lot on that line. Frankly, our technology training offerings are boot camp classes are priced below the average for the industry in America, despite the fact that we've won Top Boot Camp of the Year awards for four years running. We have an excellent program. We want to make it easy to break into the industry, and so you're not gonna find it super expensive. We haven't found that there's much need for for scholarships, um, pretty approaching with most people. So I hope that this is that

What marketing software and channels do you use to find and engage prospective students? Which are less effective? Which one do you recommend to students to learn?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
all that. So the two parts first two parts pretty easily because it's pretty straightforward. And I'd love to talk about, you know, recommendation for students. The vast majority of our students sign ups come from Google AdWords. It's an incredibly effective program. You just have to stay on top of it all the time because one Google changes how they do business in terms of paid listings. And they changed it all the time and to what people are looking for, search terms that people are looking for, that you want to have them arrived at you, and your company also shifts overtime. At the beginning, the idea of a boot camp was not a very, very well known term related to technology training. Boot camps for were for, like, the military or, you know, you go to a weight loss boot camp or that kind of thing. It wasn't really connected to learning computer programming. But over the past eight years since boot camps became a very real valid part of the technology training landscape. Now we find that people you know, you know when they're doing their own organic search, they will type in boot camp and they expect to find technology results, They'll say Python boot Camp C Sharp boot camp You know, Web boot camps and expect that to direct them to training schools. So with Google AdWords and this kind of answers, the third part, if you're interested in marketing, is a student. It's hard to get away from Google AdWords in the modern technology ecosystem. And so the one thing to know about this, you have to constantly pay attention to how they're administering that program and what your exact audience is and how your audience uses the actual tool of Google, the actual certain search engine. And so it's a constantly moving target. Eso that's like the vast majority of our successful marketing. The second most effective tool is referrals are students are very happy with our service, and you can see that with our, you know, rating reviews review ratings on Facebook and Google and Course Report, which is a great website for finding out data about boot camps. You know, all these places you can find out about boot camps. Our ratings are really high. As a result, they were further friends and loved ones to our school, really effectively So that's the second most, um, most effective, Um, you know, marketing. And the thing about that marketing is it doesn't cost you anything. Word of mouth is the best marketing there is. So we've tried a lot of other things. We've tried magazine, you know, ads, articles, blog's, um, you know, partnerships with other technology companies, that kind of thing and the only one that had any real traction. And there is a lesson here for your students. The only ones that had any real traction are partnering with course report and and the other sites like, um, that are dedicated to being a clearing house for information. Just about the software developer boot camp industry. That's all there about is just software developer boot camps and because they have made a name for themselves and they get a lot of traffic on their site. Prospective students who would sign up for boot camp arrive at their at their website very often. And so we've worked with them to do paid partnerships and has been really successful. So the lesson there for your students is that you'll find these niche markets or these types of industries that air pretty well defined. And when people want to find out about those industries, there are almost always to three really popular online resource is for them, and so you can work with those. Resource is, and that takes you outside of the realm of Google search and being stuck in the way they do things. So that's that's what I recommended them. Two overall recommendations for students to learn. Um, there's no specific platform that would recommend It's just that it's very important when you're looking at marketing to understand the audience. Who is this going to receive your communication? We've talked about defining that exact type of person that you want to address and find out what questions they have, whatever their needs, What are they looking for? You don't wanna be talking about you and your company and what's so awesome about you? Yes, you wanna bring up what is good about your company, but do it after you've done the research to know your exact target audience member Really, really well, and that is an ongoing thing requires being communication with your with your perspective, students or customers, right, and especially asking your students and your graduates, they'll tell you what it was that made them interested in your in your service we've done. We do that two or three times a year. We asked our students over and over again. What drew you to us. What were you worried about in your search for a boot camp? What were the things you were looking for? That that if it was, if you found a B and C, that was an automatic. Yes, but if you found C, d and e like No, that's it. I'm not gonna go there constantly being communication because marketing is not a static thing. It moves and shifts throughout time.

How has the demand for certain skills and technologies changed? What kind of jobs would see big growth in the upcoming years?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
is of being a technology professional, someone who works in the computer industry, the job outlooks. The demand is very strong, and it's projected to be strong well into the next decade. So just say that right at the gate, OK, that there, every once in a while you see some kind of stories, some doom and gloom story and newspapers or online about, you know, you know, have we reached the end of the technology boom or kind of weirdness like that? Absolutely not true. I know this for being a working developer. The number of jobs the positions available versus the number of people available to fill those jobs is, um, it's drastically mismatched. There's never enough talent to fill the available technology jobs Now. That said, this is a great question. Demand for certain skills, technologies changing. There's a few areas to call out for people to pay attention to. Right. One. Is this whole area of the front end JavaScript or JavaScript, developer kind of area. Five or six years ago, JavaScript was mostly known, as I said earlier, as just a really great tool for customizing the behavior of your website. But a lot of really bright people realized that we could take those skills and programming JavaScript and bring them down to the Web server. And with the development of technologies like Node, you can write, you can use your that language you know so well. JavaScript and write your actual server side code. The coast is gonna get executed on the Web server to handle business logic and use your interactions and all that. You can read it in Java script so that when you get to use JavaScript for both your front end, what happens in your browser and you're back in what happens on the server, it's fantastic. So, um, the demand for anything involving front and development and JavaScript development is growing rapidly and will remain strong. Another area that is absolutely growing quickly. And there's three things to present. The second one is the whole area of what's called DEV Ops. This stands for refer to it already since for development and operations. And it's actually ah, cultural change in how an organization does business with computer software that essentially relies on improved communication between the development people that are making the software and the operations people to provide the systems and hardware that the running software lives on and where the users actually take advantage of it when the communication between those separate parts of an organization is increased and when the you know the process of making software has lots of different points. Where, um if there's a problem, the feedback that there's a problem gets picked up almost instantly and could be acted upon right away. When that kind of a situation occurs, better software gets made faster and with less money, and that's a win win for a lot of people. So jobs surrounding Dev ops like software development engineer Sorry, site Reliability engineer is a job title. You see a lot, you'll probably see Dev Ops, Engineer or Dev, ops specialist or develops. You know, developer, anything related to that area is gonna be greatly increasing, is already on the rise and greatly increased the last one. Man. Actually, two more data science. Anything surrounding data science, Massive job increase. Right. And you wanna be very careful about searching for a program to teach you data science because it's a very loose definition is not a strict discipline yet. And so pay close attention do your research when you're looking for a data science training provider. I'm very proud of our data science boot camp. If you wanna look at ours, right, the last one is security. Cyber security is a massive, massive problem. There's so many websites and other technology systems that are extremely vulnerable to attack by bad actors. And so there is much work to be done both in patching up all the existing systems and programs that are out there and making sure that any new computer programs or systems that created are done so in a much more intelligent fashion as regards security. So if you get quality training in cybersecurity, you are. Unless you're really unhappy and not easy to person to work with, you're gonna get a job, and you're gonna get a really good job, and you'll have a really great job prospect ahead of you.I just reviewed it recently. What we're doing creating a cybersecurity professionals is we want a working, full stack software developer who understands all of the principles of cybersecurity and how they're applied across the whole stack. So as an example, there'll be a programmer or developer, which means they can build front ends. They could build the interfaces that Web applications use. But they also know all of the vulnerabilities that are exposed in the front end in terms of processing form, inputs and, you know, sending in, you know, um, falsified or spurious requests toe Web servers. They understand all the stuff that can go wrong. So when they make a front end application, they build it with those things in mind or if they're called into analyze the front end application. From a security standpoint, they could do their work much more intelligently because they understand what the developer was thinking, how the developer coded same thing on the server side. They know all the vulnerable points on the service side, same, and so they could build service side code that's safer. Or they can analyze existing service side code from a security point of view and absolutely on the database. They can program databases, both relation all databases and no sequel databases. And because they know how they're attacked, they know how to shore them up and protect them. So that's again. There's a lot of subjects you have to cover their but one final thing that they know about really well. If they know what the hardware the actual communications hardware used in networking and all the different protocols that the computers used to talk to each other, they know how that how that they should work optimally, but also what attack vectors there are that a bad actor can come in on. So when they're whenever they're doing coding work involving that or physical assembly of networks, they can think with it and they build it safer. Or if they come in to analyze an existing hardware situation, they know what to look for. So those are some of the things we cover on our cybersecurity boot camp. For a full description of it, you should go to learn coding anywhere dot com. It covers all of it

What were the major exciting and memorable moments? Were there also any moments that almost got you to quit? How did you get past them?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
of these wonderful moments revolve around that. I'll never forget. When we got our first graduated job, it was, Ah, phenomenal moment. We had four students and one of them graduated and got a job, and everybody was cheering because it worked. We were able to help people break into the industry. The next thing was pretty awesome is when someone who wasn't even fully done with the boot camp landed a job with Disney. You got a job at Disney? I mean, everyone around the world knows Disney only doing a job of Disney, but he got a job for $150,000 a year. Now that's an outlier, the average wage of our graduates of $60,000. But I'm gonna tell you, when he called into the office and said that they gave a job offer at Disney for $152,000 a year, we did jumping jacks. It was fantastic. Other big like, you know, uh, exciting. Remember moments along the way, Um, when we did our first partnership with training institution in another country. It's called the Academy of Learning, and they have 50 campuses all over Canada. and now 90 campuses over in the United Kingdom and our curriculum. They chose our curriculum to be their Web and software development curriculum. Across all 140 campuses. Signing that was a phenomenal day. But even more exciting was when all the training went live and started to be sold. And people around the world are actually doing our our training. So those are some of the really remember moments again, they really revolve around the student outcomes, which is fantastic. You said fantastic outcomes. So moments we almost got that we almost quit. Well, I'll tell you almost never started. I almost never started the thing when it was just me. I hadn't even found a partner yet. A co founder, um, I heard about boot camps and I looked online, and I'm in Portland, Oregon, and I found a website for Portland Code school, and I swore out loud, I was very upset. Great. There's already a code school in Portland. Port will never be able to support two code schools, so I might as well not even do this. Thankfully, I did. And look at it. No, no, no. This is a This is a city of two million people. I think we'll be fine. So that moment almost got me to quit. Um, I'm not gonna lie. They've been points along the way, which has been very, very tough where we've had to do, you know, big layoffs of people that are our friends and loved ones. And, you know, when you have you a startup, people are very dear to you. And there have been points where we almost had to close. But we made the painful decision of letting a bunch of people go and then rebuilding from that, they're really, really tough. The way you get past the moments like that and other moments is one. Surround yourself with people that will tell you the truth. It will be honest with you you don't want Yes, man, the people you want close to you are willing to make the difficult decisions. My co founder and I have had to make very difficult decisions. And when it comes to tough things, like layoffs or canceling an entire like, uh, you know, program that we really thought was gonna be awesome but turned out not to be good. Man, you don't want people that will beat around the bush. They need to confront what's actually going on and say what it is. Um, the other way to get past it is just to remember to study the journey of other of other founders. Every single successful technology company or any other great company of any endeavor has almost died many, many, many times. Steve Jobs lost his company, Steve Jobs founded Apple Computer and got kicked out of his own company and then came back and turned into the greatest technology company in the world. So you gotta keep reminding yourself, Educate yourself into what the journey of a founder is like what, the journey of someone who's trying to do something brave, trying to build something big and effective. It's not easy. It's a tough environment, but read about people that made it surround yourself with good people who love you and are willing to tell you the truth and just keep your eye on the mountain

Who were your competitors when you started and how did the competition evolve? How did you create a competitive advantage and a unique selling proposition?

Based on experience at: Co-Founder, The Tech Academy
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
For the most part, they were small boot camps. They were started by one or two people who like teaching and new technology well but didn't know how to run businesses. And so what we saw in the early years is boot camps would spring up left and right all over the country all over the world, and they would very rapidly die. They would just go away. We start here in our home town of Portland, Oregon, where we were founded. When we started, There were four boot camps. Way were the fourth boot camp, and it's only been no nine months since boot camps even started down in the Bay Area. So even up here in Oregon, you could see people caught on real quick. Hey, there's something going on here. We have four different boot camps were the fourth to enter the ring. Well, it's six or seven years later, and there's only two of us left, and that other one wants to sell his business and move on to something else. So what's happened in those intervening years? You know, the rapid start up of a bunch of small ones is two things. One ah, consolidation by some large educational companies who see the value of this intensive, short term computer programming training kinda like a trade school for computer programmers, if you will. And they bought up some boot camp providers. And so there's some consolidation going on in the industry. The other thing you see is individual operators of boot camps like myself and Jack, who haven't necessarily wanted to do that to merge into something large and are instead concentrating on getting bigger and bigger themselves with greater licensing deals, mawr, physical campuses, more boot camp offerings, public publishing books, um, you know, offering free services toe help the community, you know, becoming a whole entity in love itself, but not part of some big, huge educational company. So those are the two kind of trends I see. There is a lot of merger and acquisition activity has happened over the years in the boot camp industry for anything from $10 million up to $450 million and it za vibrant economy now vibrant industry in terms of, um, competitiveness, how to competition involved over. At first it was the wild Wild West. But then, in about 2015 we were getting enough flak as an industry. Enough criticism for, um, certain schools misrepresenting the metrics of how effective they were that we all banded together into something called the C I R R the Coalition for, uh, independent results reporting. And this is third party reviewed results of how effective our programs are getting people hired and so you could go to see I r R. And they'll show everybody. So that actually helped competition Because people of goodwill are really trying to do a good job. Had a nice level playing field of comparison to demonstrate to prospective students and the people that were really not, you know in it with good intentions fell off, the radar disappeared. Finally, how did you create a competitive advantage? Unique selling proposition. We knew from the beginning that we had an exact educational philosophy wanted operate off, and that part of it included making it so that anyone who is reasonably bright a new math could get through our program and then it be self paced and they'd be open enrollment. We didn't want to do the cohorts that all starting the same day and all moved the pro through the program in lockstep because what I knew from having taught for years in the Navy is that when you do that, you'll get most of your students. But you have outliers. On the one hand you have On the one hand, you have the people that are really, really bright and are screaming through it, and they get very frustrated at being held back. But on the other hand, you have people that are bright. But for some reason one thing got them hung up, and from the moment they found something like that and misunderstood word or some sort of concept, and they're not quite grasping everything else you're saying or presenting its blank, they don't get it at all. And so we needed a system that would help both of them. If you're Brighton, you can scream through it, Do it. We had one guy that went through one of our early boot camps. Ah, boot camp was supposed to take 15 weeks. He did it nine weeks. The guy was there 70 hours of week. He was an incredible student. He's one of the most intelligent, dynamic, fantastic developers I personally have ever seen, and we had a program perfect for that guy because he could scream through and put in whatever hours he wanted to. On the other hand, we have people that they use every bit of the seven months it might take together through a program. When they're done, both of them know what they're doing. They understand the technology and they can apply it. They get hired and they can actually part of a working development team. So self paced, open enrollment so you can start any time right and both full time and part time options. That is an absolute competitive advantage. And it's a unique selling proposition. There's lots of boot camps out there besides the fact that our curriculum is highly reviewed. There's other good curriculums out there. Yeah, anybody who's recently bright could get through a program, and you can do it part time, open enrollment and and you can start any time. Uh, there's one more about in there. It's self paced. Exactly exactly

What college programs did you attend and what were their best parts? How did each of your college programs prepare you for your career?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
because I would frankly put the training that I got the Navy up against almost any engineering school. It was extremely good, actually had something that happened last week that reminded me after 30 years how good the training was in the Navy. So the program I attend was called, Asai said earlier, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, and it was at that time down in Orlando, Florida I think now it's in Charleston, South Carolina, or something like that. But it's the same school. It's the same basic program because the set of technologies, instead of you know, the body of knowledge you need to know, hasn't changed much and probably won't for a long time, Right? So here's what it waas is. You get out of boot camp and you do six months of school. As you know, electron ICS training. Now it must be stressed What training is like in the military one. It's about 60 to 70 hours a week. Ah, classroom time. So in six months you can learn an unbelievable amount of data. You don't have to worry about food, about lodging, about having any other job. It's like you're on a scholarship on steroids. All you're doing is going to class all the time, right? And it's extremely competitive. You know, you're with a bunch of nerdy guys and every wants to be the top of the class. You work your butt off. And in six months, I learned so much about electron ICS. It was really, really good. Okay, I would put up against, ah, year and a half worth of college in electronic engineering. Right? But then the real fun came. Now you go to nuclear power school, enable nuclear power school was then and is still now the most academically intense and challenging school in the U. S. Military. At the time I attended it, it had a 14% drop out rate and a 1% suicide rate. I don't publicize that cause it's great just to illustrate the picture. It was very, very hard. And in that in that school they taught you obviously nuclear engineering, all kinds of advanced math, especially into, you know, calculus because you have to be able to think with the mathematics, what's going on with nuclear fission, and we keep transfer and with fluid flow. Oh, and they also taught you heat transfer and fluid flow. They taught you all the principles of physics, and they taught you chemistry in detail because the chemistry inside a nuclear reactor with water that's at £2000 of pressure and is it 560 degrees? And it's being constantly circulated through a nuclear no mass. That chemistry is utterly vital, and you need to know all the factors involved in it, right? You know, several other subjects, especially related to electrical engineering power, you know, power generation and distribution. And here's the thing about this. You asked, What's the best part of it? The best part of it? Is it because the outcome of that school was a working sailor who could go to an actual operational ship and be part of a working engineering department? What they concentrated on with the practical application of all of this knowledge. So they were definitely gonna teach you the theory in order to learn anything about you know how to generate electricity. There's a lot of theory you need to know, but what they concentrated heavily is how does this get applied in the real world? So as a huge, overarching statement, what I walked away from. This is How did you eat your college programs? Prepare you for career? It is more of a general statement. It's that because every aspect of it had as core. How are you going to use this in the real world? What I do when I arrive on a job or when I teach someone is I care enough about the theory for them to understand why I think exists or the thought process behind it. What I care about much Mawr is can they use it? Can they do the job? And I'll give you an example of why this is important early on in the Tech Academy in our history, it's about like spring of 2014. It was really early on. We've been around for, like, three or four months. We needed to hire someone we needed another instructor and ah, friend of mine was a college computer science professor, and his son had just graduated from his program, and his program is widely respected. And so we hired his son and it was a disaster. Give me the first practical task that we asked him to do was to create a simple default WordPress website do. We could later customize. All I wanted to do was spit up a WORDPRESS website. He literally couldn't do it. Couldn't do it. There's probably, if not thousands, at least hundreds of tutorials online telling you exactly how to do this, and he couldn't do it now. In his defense, he's a bright kid. He got trained in theory of computer science much better than even I know, but he couldn't apply it. He couldn't think on his feet with stuff, right? He's doing really well now. He works in cybersecurity with Nike, and he's got his dream job and he's a great kid. But it showed me that if you don't concentrate on the practical element of what you're learning, you're hobbling somebody. You're cutting them off the knees. And that came directly from what I learned in the Navy as part of that training program. So that's how prepared me for my career is I just want to get into my hand, get my hands dirty. Yes, teach me how you know how it works, but more importantly, I want to jump in and use it and do something with it. That's really helped me a lot

What three life lessons have you learned over your career? If any, please also discuss your experiences facing adversity, or trying something unusual.

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
We are not at our best when we're being selfish and only looking out for number one. We as human beings, are at our best. We're helping others, and when we kept that in mind, have succeeded and the people around me have done well. So maybe the first thing. The second thing is this, that it sounds very mechanical, but I think it's really important because I work in education. When you are studying any subject the moment you encounter, ah, word or symbol that you don't understand. Stop immediately and clear up what it ISS work out, what that word or symbol means. It's extremely important. It applies to any endeavor. Anything you're trying to study, don't go past those words. And then the third thing is that the most important skill you have is not technical. It doesn't matter whether you're a plumber, a carpenter computer programmer, a teacher. The most important skill you have isn't technical. It never is. It's communication and understanding. If you are willing to communicate with the goal of actually understanding another person's point of view, you can solve anything, you can solve anything. So those lessons I've learned of my career experiences facing adversity. Umand I refer to this little bit earlier when it's talking about, you know, surrounding yourself with, you know, really competent people and people will tell you the truth. Um, but the fact of the matter is that life is tough and I have gone through personal loss of an almost unimaginable level. And I can tell you that when I came away from that with Is that whatever your group is that matters to you on a and emotionally spiritually level, cultivate that group, love them, help them. And if you ever go through something horrible, they'll be there for you. I wouldn't be ableto emerge through this without them. The second thing is to never lose sight of how amazing you are. People are wonderful. People are really fantastic. They're interesting and dynamic and wild and crazy and fun and spirited. And they have creativity in them. And yeah, I just love people never lose sight of of how amazing you are and how amazing other people are. Despite all of the reasons given to be cynical and suspect that people are bad, don't buy into it. That will help you get through adverse situations because you're gonna need friends, and you can look at people and love them and trust. Um, you're gonna do well if you're constantly thinking that someone's trying to get something over on you or they can't be trusted, man, when something really bad goes down, gonna be all alone and that's not a place you want to be.

What starting job (after internship) would you recommend to students who hope to grow professionally like you? What other parting advice, dos, and don'ts would you give?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Mon Nov 16 2020
being an entrepreneur, a writer, a creator, that kind of profession, right, because that's a lot of what I do now, right? Um, and the answer is that there isn't any one particular starting job or internship that recommend, as there aren't really that money, like there's no jobs for being an entrepreneur, for being a business owner for being a mentor or cultivator of other people. And yet that's what I find myself doing a lot. What I'm going to say is, this is whatever business area or domain you find yourself wanting to or ableto work in, I would concentrate on a couple of things. One is always being willing to learn and to help other people. You're going to consistently find, um, that if you're open to seeing other people's point of view and helping them to achieve something that's important to them, you're gonna find out about opportunities and ways of doing things that you're never going to see if you're concerned only with you, and that an entrepreneur or business leader has to be able to do. A leader is concerned with the viewpoint and success of every single person around them, not him. That's how that works, right? The second thing is, this is it's very helpful or smart, in my opinion, to find one sort of technology or skill that's usually worth a lot of money to do and takes a lot of intelligence or hard work to get good at and get very, very good at it. Because you can leverage that in brief. You could do things like this. You can let's say its programming use programming because that's what I do right. You can get paid to directly program for other people. Fine, you can get paid to supervise other people in programming because you know it really well. You can get paid to teach other people to program because you know programming really well. You can get paid to write books about programming because you know it really well. The fact is that if you have possession of deep skill, the knowledge in one area that's very valuable, you can leverage that to make a lot of money in a lot of different areas. And it isn't about the money. It's about surviving well, all these multiple, different ways that you can leverage, having worked really hard to learn one thing and learn it well into mawr survival. Mawr exchange with the people around you. So that's the That's the advice, argued people parting advice do's and don't you want that? I mean, I think I already covered a lot of stuff that's important to me. Do find the things that you like and admire and others. And don't concentrate on the things you don't like about them. You're not gonna get anywhere. Do be willing to be brave and do something that's scary. But don't be afraid to pull the plug and change your mind when you realize Wow, okay, it's time. It's time to pivot, right? Fail early and fail often kind of a thing, right? And finally just, um, advice is, um, just be kind. Two people just be kind. I know it's not a business thing. It's not a teaching thing. It's not a technology thing, but it applies in every endeavor. Just be kind. You don't need to be mean or jerk or excessively forceful to succeed. Yes, you've gotta hold your position and be certain and express that certainty. They can do so with respect for others in kindness Always been my pleasure