Current Time 0:00
/
Duration Time -:-
Progress: NaN%

How did you get to where you are today? What is your story? What incidents and experiences shaped your career path?

Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
so I wouldn't single it down to any specific incident guard throughout my life. It's more of thinking about things of, you know, why not in approaching every task, anything that comes at you as far as you know. Well, why not do this? Why not do something different? So, in between, you know, my undergrad program, which was in psychology and now my grad program in the MSG A So is business analytics. I even took upon, you know, martial arts. I did. Blacksmith united welding, you know, just approaching different things that I typically would not have.

What are the responsibilities and decisions that you handle at work? Discuss weekly hours spent in the office, for work travel, and working from home.

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
So Goldman Sachs is actually pretty flexible with working from home, especially with being a non contingent worker and how they define contended A pretty much like a contract if you're going through like a contract agency, um, so with responsibilities, I am in operations, and I work in alternate investment management selection. So how will that division works? Um, so you can go and you can invest into any entity you can go to Blackstone. You can go to Warburg Pincus and you could make an investment. However, through Goldman Sachs and the alternate investment, select a manager selection. You get invested to Goldman, and then Golden will then select different general partners and invest for you. And then you're gonna have is a way to diversify your portfolio, and you can invest in multiple entities at one time. So as far as ours, they do run a little higher, averaging about like 55 to 60. But there again, very flexible when you need to work from home when you need to make an appointment, because when you think about it, like any time you need to go grocery shopping, if you need to run to the dentist office that are very flexible as faras, if you need to go and make accommodate for those

What tools (software programs, frameworks, models, algorithms, languages) do you use at work? Do you prefer certain tools more than the others? Why?

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
so at a woman. In my current job, I worked with all tricks. I worked with Tableau, Excel Access, not much sequel, but I have learned some. I do have a preference for all tricks just because the capacity it has for data preparation for a lot of business decisions we have to make, and it's very user friendly. So instead of actually writing code, it's through tools, so you can have, you know, a formula tool, and and it's a way to basically right road without writing code.

What things do you like about your job? Were there any pleasant surprises?

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
Oh, definitely. So I think Goldman Sachs has not necessarily a great rep for being a ah, work, family friendly were the balance, whereas that's not the case whatsoever and and, I think went coming in to the firm from as being a lateral hire. So I had prior work experience. I was almost a little intimidated because, you know, I came from having like, a 40 hour job, and now it's like I go in at seven. Sometimes I leave with seven or even later, and it's, you know, it's definitely very intimidating because there's you have these kind of, like pretty conceived notions what your expectations of what you will have, um to accomplish. And so everyone has it. Literally every other person there, everyone does. And so it's almost like there's this built in camaraderie because people go in having the same kind of preconceived notion where you know there's a high expectation of a bit of each other. So it's not that it's a dog eat dog world at the firm, and it's not that, you know, they're gonna push you to the brim. It's like the firm is very accommodating. They're very understanding, and there they value their people very much

What are the job titles of people you routinely work with inside and outside of your organization? What approaches do you find to be effective in working with them?

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
Oh, there are pretty standardised level. So analysts, associate VP managing director partner and typically around the same kind of then you like, we're going to be working with other banks. They have the same levels as well. Like associate senior associate associate, one associate to analysts, one senior analyst. So you kind of have a understanding of where they sit. And it's just in understanding of, you know, just treat everyone with respect. If you see, so you're going to be emailing or interacting with someone who's an officer or someone who's going to be a managing director, you know, obviously have maybe someone do like a once over on the email before you send it. You know you don't want to have because you're our representative of the company of the firm as well, not just of your team

What major challenges do you face in your job and how do you handle them? Can you discuss a few accomplishments?

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
some challenges. Do we have a variety of personalities on the team? But that's, you know, I think you'd encounter that really anywhere. And it's just having, like, open conversations. And how do you because everyone's there and, you know, to be accomplishing goals as a team. It's not what you can accomplish on your own cause. When you succeed, you succeed as a team. When you fail, you fail as a team, and it's not necessarily failure. It's an opportunity to be better. And so it's a discussion of, you know, obviously you know, this route did not pan out. What can we do better? What can we be doing differently? What can we be making more efficient soas faras accomplishments. We have a new head like we've had, like additional five head counts. We're looking at reducing 20 additional hours by making more efficiencies for bigly functions, and you'll re investing that time for more, you know, business purposes

What was the hiring process like for your job? What were the roles of people who interviewed you? What questions were asked and how did you answer them?

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
so it the hiring process varies, and especially because I was a lateral hire, meaning again that I already had prior work experience versus being hired from it directly from the campus and being an intern previously. So I have met people that I went through upwards of 17 rounds of interviews over the phone and in person I had on Lee in person interviews, and I had about six rounds of those, and I had a range of associate and VP level and across different roles in operations and then across different teams as well. A lot of like data products. So working with across different parts in the trade cycle, both pre trade and post trade, and I want that had to deal with you. Are you okay with doing a monotonous work as part of the day is, you know, there's a lot of stuff you're not gonna do that's gonna be fun, but it's going to end up, You know, you kind of have to trudge through the trenches, does it? You, in order to understand, like, what is this function? What is this role and how is it in order to understand, like, what can this be better? How does this function fit into the overall product line? How can this fit into the overall teen overall? How does this team make the firm money?

What are the various starting positions and salaries in your domain? What are the typical career paths after these starting positions?

Based on experience at: Sr. Analyst, Goldman Sachs
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
Oh, that varies based on experience and roll, because I got hired in as an analyst, but with prior experience. So I did get a little bit higher pay than someone who got fired off of the campus. So starting pay could, ranging from, like 40,000 upwards to maybe, like 55. But then again, it would vary in that, especially bending on area. And what the division and department career pass that you know it can up in the air because opportunities open up every day really depends on you what is in line for the firm and was in line with success of the team.

How does the program prepare you for your career? (Think about career fairs, networking events, resume & interview help, classes & alumni support).

Based on experience at: Master of Science - Business Analytics, University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
Okay, so the program I kind of stumbled upon because I have a co worker that's already in the program. So the tech club helps a lot because they have the job fairs. There is a lot of people that are passionate about the same type of field, the analytics understanding the problem. How do we well, problems? And that's the one thing that I found fascinating, especially with this being the Marquis program in Business Analytics. It's not, you know, you don't have to deal with almost don't necessarily call it nonsense of undergrad. But you know, you don't have to go through, um, you know, required courses. But, you know, it's like, Well, where does that? You know, police. I fit into this. Where does you know this? Softer science kind of fit into this where everything is geared towards what you're really passionate about. So the course work is great. All of the TSR super helpful that professors want to see you succeed And every student I have interacted with is really helpful in understanding, you know? How can we make each other better? How can we get better in this field? How can we get better you're not necessarily just in this class like you want to stick together and there's a like camaraderie like from the get go.

What other majors and universities did you consider? What prompted you to pick this program over others?

Based on experience at: Master of Science - Business Analytics, University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
I did consider a phD in cognitive science because during my undergrad in psychology, I was in Are Ready for that department. I chose not to pursue its It wasn't something I wasn't I'm passionate about. You know, I could see myself being successful, but in the long run, it wasn't something that really made me happy. And and I picked this because so the firm offers what they call like a dad a school where they go over kind of like a broad overview of some data science where it covers, you know, sequel, all tricks, data, visualization, data warehousing and defensive design. And it was something that I felt like I clicked like I understood it very well. I enjoyed it, and I felt like I could pursue it and, you know, for years. So I once I heard that I had a coworker that was actually in a program designed with what I actually felt was part of my knee. Shrew is great, like everything was falling in line

What strategies helped you get into this program? What exams and kind of scores are needed? What things did you highlight in your application package or interview?

Based on experience at: Master of Science - Business Analytics, University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
Okay, So Strategies. I had two separate tutor tutors. So 14 quantitative on the G. Matt and then one for more of the verbal reasoning and analytical writing eso. While there isn't necessarily a minimum score, it was recommended that you get around like 5 50 just to be like a competitive applicants in order to get, like, be eligible for scholarships. But they do take, like, a holistic approach. So it's not just going to your scores. It's gonna be your essays. It's gonna be your letters of recommendation. So honestly think I wouldn't necessarily know what I highlighted Well, in order to get accepted. But I think if you're passionate about it, it shows, so you will show in your scores. It will show in what, though you're recommend Er's will write about you. It'll show in how you present yourself in your essays. It will show in how you connect with the advisers if you reach out to them, and shortly. If you're passionate, it'll show in, regardless of what aspect

What challenges did you face in the program and felt good about overcoming? Were there any concerns before joining that prove to be wrong?

Based on experience at: Master of Science - Business Analytics, University of Utah - David Eccles School of Business
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
was still, I thought with, you know, the with hours that I work and with the hours required just to even be successful in school, regardless of your part time or full time, I was scared that I wouldn't be successful. And it's proving not to be the case because everything is designed to be successful for a full time employee, regardless of where you're employed at. So you could be, you know, a normal like nine to fiver and still be able to make glass at six. And so most of glasses are, you know, 6 to 10 unless indicated otherwise or their online, which is great. You know, I'm able to manage a nearly full time workload and not stress. I'm still able to see my family and still able see friends on weekends, so being able to maintain balance while still working and not having any hiccups in any other facet of my life has been outstanding.

How did the program prepare you for your career? (Think about career fairs, networking events, resume & interview help, classes & alumni support).

Based on experience at: Bachelor's of Science, Psychology, University of Utah
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
psychology goes, I think it's really applicable anywhere. When you think about you know, it's analyzing behaviors, analyzing how people work, analyzing how you know decision making, and depending on which fast you really look at, you know how we development. And so it's also the polar opposite of like Now we're looking at No Business Analytics, and I'm previously it was a noble people. So I think they're really working well together. We're going forward is just in a business sense. So how the program previously works well is especially at the U, because the hugest as an undergrad overall, just there's a lot of job fairs available. There's a lot of involvement just because I was part of several honor societies like the Phi Kappa Phi Tau Sigma, just cause I was a transfer student. There's mailers I still receive just from being part of those two just network, you know, events for Phi Kappa Phi. Um

What other majors and universities did you consider? What prompted you to pick this program over others?

Based on experience at: Bachelor's of Science, Psychology, University of Utah
Summarized By: Jeff Musk on Fri Sep 13 2019
I think. Psychology me, Alex. I do have a brother in the military, and he struggled when he came back and he was medically retired. And I wondered myself a little, How can I make a difference? And it prompted me. That's what the whole reason I was considering. Ah, phD in cognitive science and doing research is seeing the trials and tribulations he dealt with with. Going through with the V A is, well, what can I do to make his experiences not be duplicated to other people? How can this situation not happen for another person? And I want the reason I decided against it. Like, Why do I have to pay money when I can volunteer easily right now and make the same experience happen? Um, but that's pretty much why I went to psychologist. I wanted to see how I could level with his experience with, even though I wasn't able to join the military due to my asthma. But being able to be there for someone who went through experience like thatyou.