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Where are you originally from? Have you lived in other places? What kind of things do you enjoy (eg sports, dance, music, food, art, movies, reading etc)?

Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
I am from India but even in India I am from Kerala which is one of the southern states but I was born in Bihar and then I moved and attended six schools between kindergarten and high school so just get moving. Born in Bihar and I did high school in Chennai, a middle school in Gujarat and college in Delhi and Rajasthan, grad school in Chapel Hill North Carolina. I got my Ph.D. at C.M.U in Pittsburgh, I worked in Boston and now I'm in Washington DC. All my life, I've moved around quite in general, and comfortable it most places. What kind of things do I enjoy, sports, I used to play squash for the longest time till I ended up injuring one of my ankles. Music, I just talked about that, I used to play for a band when I was in grad school and I still, sort of, enjoy dabbling in music. Other than that, now I'm getting into basketball with my son, it's interesting to go to pick up a sport with your son because he beats me at it but it's still good, it gets me out of my comfort zone so that's always fun.  

What do students learn in your bachelor program, and jobs students get afterwards? Please also discuss about your graduate program(s), if you offer any.

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
Our undergraduate program apparently, it's quite though of highly ranked within the university of Maryland. Our undergraduate I.S. program is really focused on mainstream I.S. we prepare our students for jobs IT consulting firms. We have students who go into social media company like facebook and twitter, we have a lot of them who go into defense contracts because we are in Washington so that's a very large section of our employers, Lockheed Martin are companies that come and pick up a lot of our students even though a lot of the IT consulting jobs tend to be defense-oriented or for the federal government so that is the sort of nature of our undergraduate program.With the MBAs, MBA is a little bit more of a diversified so I would say the two majors that people tend to prefer are finance and marketing so we've had success with having people do a double major when they do finance andtechnology or marketing and technology and that combination seems to work quite well so our MBA recruiting is a little bit more broad-based as thirty percent of our students are international so they tend to not look like defense contractors because there are a Visa issues. We also have a masters program in M.S. and I.S. which is doing quite well we have an incoming batch between a hundred and ten and hundred and twenty every year and that's mostly international, I would say ninety percent of the incoming batch is international. They have a few more problems the but they, for the most part, end up in technical jobs so developers at Walmart, social media analyst at Wayfair, business analyst at Pricewaterhouse, Beloit so those are some of the more traditional IT jobs, not quite entry-level but a little better than that so these are people that two or three of the work experience so that seems to be our sweet spot for now hopefully because the turmoil in the immigration scenario so we don't know where things are gonna go but at least that's the sort of strategic position that we are in.  

How would you encourage students to apply to your programs? Would you like to clear any misconceptions that discourage certain students from applying to your programs?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
In the master's program, we have had students who occasionally own who come in from a business background, like they have done a bachelors in business and finance or a bachelors in accounting and economics and they come in are not realizing that there is a level of technical content that they have to master so we have to sort ofwork with them and get them up to speed as quickly as possible because almost half the content tends to be verytechnical in nature so that can be sometimes a problem but other than that we've been quite lucky in terms of being able to hit the required skills so we have people who come in with computer science degrees, electronics degree, electrical engineering, we have a student who comes in from a civil engineering background but has done technical work before coming into the program, we have people who come in from computational economic so in M.S. , I.S. program or our marketing is that sixty percent of the program is technical forty percent of it is more managerial. You should be ready to do the technical stuff but it's not pure technical in the sense that it's not a replacement for a masters in computer science, there is a sizeable business component to it and you need to be okay with this mix. We haven't really had any issues with the wrong student getting into the wrong program that having to do remedial work but not systematically. At this point, my research interests are broadly technology, entrepreneurship, innovation, and the technology service so they sound a little weird because they're on the three buckets so let me give you a quick description of each so when I talk about technology platform I'm talking about, as you are clearly familiar with this stuff, so well you're talking about companies that are essentially market makers like the Facebook, Google and the Amazons of the world where you have your different parts of the market being connected on the basis of technology so the platform provides a matching function, it provides a market-making function, it provides auxiliary services so we have a lot of work that looks at various forms all these technology platforms. The second stream is somewhat uncommon in terms of traditional I.S. research which is the entrepreneurship and innovation I think you're the kind of person who will understand these points. In general, I think the focus here is on understanding how new IT firms or the new technology firms are all. How do they gain support, what is their ecosystem, what is the ecology, how did the role of the become viable and eventually how do they succeed either in the form of being an IPO or in form of being bought out. In some cases they failed, that's fine too as long as people are able to work quickly enough and do something else with their time. These are the general questions about early age firms mostly technology, for the most part, research in this area has stayed in strategy and finance so you have a lot of papers in strategy and finance concerned that have looked at technology firms and how they grow which is sort of interesting because arguably people in IT also have a contribution to the literature and eventually understand more of the technology and the various pieces that work together with relative to a scholar in finance and strategy but there's been this black hole in the I.S. research on understanding entrepreneurial questions about technology and so I think a few years ago I started working in this area with acouple of my colleagues and we realized that there is a hole to be filled so that they can be more workers really looking at this notion of entrepreneurship and technology which, to my mind, is very fertile area for I.S. researchbecause that's what we do. The third area is services which is my dissertation many years ago was on software sourcing and that continues to have sort of a sweet spot like I have a liking or a very affectionate sense of belonging for that community, for that literature so I still have a little bit of work that looks at things like software outsourcing, strategic sourcing, contracts, these are things that I have studied in the past. That stream of work is not quite as active at this point in time as the other two but it is still what I wrote my dissertation on so there'salways the level of affection for the kind of work but it is relatively small compared to the volume on the other twoparts of my research.  

How did you come across these ideas? How did you decide that these projects would be worth pursuing?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
That is very hard to quantify because there is no recipe for doing this. I have a couple of things that typically work for me, one is I spend a lot of time or at least try to spend a lot of time cultivating working relationships with other scholars who compliment me, to my mind, that is one of the best things about being an academic that you get to work with other people who are extremely smart and ambitious and are able to fully work, collectively the whole is much greater than the sum of the parts and that sort of the group so to a large extent my choice of project is driven by my own sense of what is interesting in what is topical, what needs attention combined with a sense ofcollaboration with somebody else who has a similar idea or who feels the same way and I have often noticed that you’re bouncing ideas off of each other typically gets you past that point where you have an idea and you don't know which one to actually push to the next level. I'm not sure that's making sense so on any given day I have ten to twelve ideas you read the newspaper, you read about what's happening in the world and you have an idea but not every idea makes it to the next level so that's where I think having a very active vibrant collaborative circle comes in handy because your collaborators act as the first level of a filter and they also act like the idea multipliers like somebody says its great and then you start to read or to build on it and before you know in a couple of weeks you after you have the makings all of the viable plan rather than just an idea to me I think there is a combination of serendipity, happen to be in the right place at the right time, open up your mind in terms of considering new projects and the willingness to invest a little bit of time and actually pushing it to the next level. One of the problems that I think we have in our field, sometimes with Ph.D. students, there's a tendency to start many projects but there's always a difficulty in finishing, it is like you are a child in the candy store, there's all the new stuff you can do but I think the problem is finishing so to my mind the ability to finish is necessary and that is by write off the bad habit about having this sort of collaborative effect that helps elevate things to the next level and in a month or two months if that has not gotten elevated to the next level then maybe the time is not right, maybe you know this is not the best time to be exploring that particular idea so it sort of goes on to the back one. I wish Icould say I had this algorithm were to know step one through six, I don’t. A lot of it is collaboration, like-minded people, conversations, and an open mind.  

What criteria do you use to evaluate papers while reviewing? What are common reasons for papers getting rejected? How can authors improve the chance of getting their papers accepted?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
We have to acknowledge that not all of the papers get accepted into the best runs and not all journal papers are best. I'm not saying anything new I think it's reasonable to say look, there are all these sorts of errors and categorization that happens which is fine. That said, the more time I spend in the field the more I am convinced that asymptotically like in the long run, things do work so in the long run paper that is an important message will make it. Effectively in the long run, a good paper will make it to a good journal. Now it may not happen in the first round, it may not happen in the second round, it may not even happen but eventually, it will make it and I think for the most part eventually papers do get better, not every time but again for the most part. To be successful, I believe a paper has to be able to answer two questions. The first one which I think we struggled with as an academic is so what, so why do I care, what is it about this particular question that is going to change the conversation that is going to in some form or the other really change the way people think about that particular domain. One needs to be able to enunciate the question upfront in a very clear manner and there are shades of gray to go so what I mean certain things are critical if you're talking about health information technologies and saving lives the so what answer is sort of staring you in the face. In other contexts the so what may not be as clear but as an author you still need to be able to sort of enunciating it. You need to be able to say this is why I believe this is a problem that needs to be addressed, this is why you should care about the answer. The second that I think is important is the what's a new question, what is unique, what is novel, what is interesting about this particular approach in the problem so I think we need to be able to talk about novelty or we talk about interesting so we talk about how the methodology is cool. I think that is sort of the what's the new angle which is what is it aboutthis particular approach that is novel. Now, to my mind, an idea of paper will answer both, it will have a very clear so what question answered and will also tell you clearly look this is why this particular paper is novel. Now that's an ideal one but we live in a not ideal world so in many cases you have papers that address the so what question but may not be able to hit the novelty or the what’s a new angle and in other cases the so what question is not necessarily new but I'm able to hit the problem with a level of novelty in terms of data or the methodology that could make it somewhat compelling. To my mind, as an editor or even as an author I have these two dimensions that I can play with how do I figure out on the margins or how to push each dimension out enough to the pointwhere I'm able to make enough of a contribution to the field by virtue of my writing I'm able to show the contribution to read. It could be that some papers will go the extra mile on one dimension and they don't quite to the other dimension as well and it's okay I know there are people that address really important question very topical, very critical of the methods are not that great but I'm willing to give the paper a pass because the topic is really interesting and all the papers where the topic is not particularly interesting it's an old and standard topic but the logical treatment or the approach is so unique that you will say, okay the question is not actually new or thatinteresting but the treatment so cool, okay so I tend to think on those line until I'm constantly making trade-offs or as an editor, I'm making trade-offs between saying do you have enough all these two dimensions if you don't haveeither then you are in trouble. Let me add this one more piece, I think, in our field its often assumed that science wise writers, we compare ourselves sometimes to people in physics or genetics and biology where they write papers and you think of yourself as a science writer so there is a tendency to try and quantify everything and write it out in a very mathematical format or write it out almost algorithmically. I think that is a problem, if you pick up an article in science or in nature if you pick up an article in biology or genetics, the article, in most times, by the time they get to the second sentence it's jargon, you're writing if you are a novice you cannot get beyond the first paragraph, at the end of the first paragraph you have no idea what’s happening and that's science. That's because you're writing to somebody who speaks the language you're using, vocabulary that is very clear you don't need towaste time in spelling out. I think in our fields, we are fundamentally social science writers. We write socialscience papers which my mind means I'm not giving you a fact I'm giving you an interpretation of a phenomenon and I'm trying to convince you through arguments and source of logic from being able to reason from point a to point B in a reasonable manner that my interpretation of this phenomenon is accurate so I'm not stating a fact I'm trying to convince in trying to persuade you which means that the writing style that I use has to be different it has to be persuasive. It's like I'm trying to convince you it also means that writing becomes very important, being able to provide an argument and back it up and be able to justify it using contextual knowledge and using domain knowledge I mean all of that becomes really important. The reason I'm saying this is I think generally that there is a sense in our field that I can write a paper I can that write fifteen tables together and I can give you a bunch of robustness check making you a bunch of analogy that basically told the statistical econometric look at the problem and I'm done my mind that sort of misses the point about social science writing where the focus should be on convincing in relatively imperfect data environment we don't have complete visibility to keep it. It's just not you go to a kind of you're talking about economical sociology psychology don’t have complete visibility so a certain amount of time has to be spent on writing an opinion manner and sometimes that is missing so even though a paper has the two dimensions in its control, you do have an interesting question and you will have a good methodology you have to be able to write it nicely and sometimes that can be a problem.  

What are some major research gaps that you believe needed to be addressed? Gaps could be in the field in general, or in your area of research.

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
In my area of research, I think you know as I said you know this notion of entrepreneurship and innovation so entrepreneurial thinking, what makes small software firms do well for instance. Now there's a lot of work that looks at incubators and software accelerators, seed accelerators, these are the little companies that take on TechStars and these are programs that help small firms reach traction. We believe that IT industry is sort of our subject tool than most IT firms actually started, there is this stereotype of two guys starting a firm in the garage. We tend to study the Microsofts and Googles of the world but we don't actually study to form a two guy firm that started in the garage and that's entrepreneurship and I think that is a big gap. I'm actually happy that in the last four or five years there are more and more papers addressing that specific gap. I think that is good, I think your papers are also in that group so I think I'm sort of speaking to somebody who's hopefully convinced of the same problem. We need more papers of this type in the field, other thing that I think we'll become more and more relevant I think there is a gap in gender issues in computing so now with the me too movement and with the chills and bugs sort of leaning in that the whole of sort of metaphor of trying to break the glass ceiling for women deck and if you extend that to all the stuff you read about who was in the toxic environment that was apparently there in uber for women and I mean there is a huge gap about how in the tech industry, gender dynamic plays out, I think thatthere is very little work that actually looks at that and that I think is something that we need to look at. We already have plenty of people looking at platforms, plenty of people looking at the standard questions that you talkabout social media and how social media influences firms which I'm not mocking that research because I think it's important and there's a lot of work but I think these other spaces where we need a little bit more work, one is thisnotion of gender issues in tech, the second area that I think is also becoming interesting is the use of technology in what is broadly called prosocial behavior, right so one of our students at Maryland, Priyanshu. Priyanshu had apaper that if they're going to hit, or soon going to hit the management sciences and I don't know if it's already been accepted or not about how in China they run an experiment using SMS on mobile to try and get people todonate blood. The idea was effective, if I can use incentives who yes a mess how do I get people to actually, how do I nudge them into going and donating blood so on my paper on looking at how you can use the mobile apps to get people to donate money to charity by applying the right incentive so I think this notion of using technology in a pro-social context not based on sales rank or not based on revenues and not on the market share but really looking at how do we get people to do more good I think that is an interesting end. I think that that there's a little bit more gap there that needs to be addressed and the third one that I think people are already working on it is in the context of healthcare and not just EMRs and EHRs, I’m talking about, I think there’s a gap in understanding how an individual interacts with an embedded device on the mobile app by or a more sort of personal technology device to enhance their Personal wellbeing at a level in a sort of taking healthcare down to the individual as opposed to hospitals and teams I think that's the gap and that's a little hard to do because you have a lot of these data regulations but I think that's another area where you're going to see some really cool stuff.  

What approaches have you found to be effective in working with various grant making agencies? What common mistakes researchers do while applying for grants and funding?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
A lot of my work tends to be with industry, I think all of my papers have some sort of industry component that usually involves three to six months of following them and talking to them and convincing them. There's a very substantial time that's built into getting new collaborations up and running. In my experience there is no shortcut in creating that trust, unfortunately, every one of these relationships takes time to build, and almost always the first project is usually small. It takes a Little bit of time to build that trust, in the long run I think these have worked out well because once you have access to the company and companies data and once they trust you then they are willing to open up and you have access to all kinds of interesting data as long as you don't violate that trust, at that point they are willing to say okay, so the good thing about having industry relationships is your looking not at one paper, you’re looking at platform research because you can get three or five papers out because there are layers to what we can do within that industry once you have access to the company data but these are hard, it takes time so the advice that I would give on getting industry collaborators is when I was a when I came to Maryland I worked two and a half years at a consulting firm and I used to help this partner I used to work for in business development and his approach was very useful which is you approach by customers, you give it your best shot, if it doesn’t work then walk away so you have to actually at some point you have to say okay this is not gonna work, I'm not getting the data I want, it’s just too much trouble. It's hard to walk away because you spent time is always on the Suncor but in my experience I think for every collaboration that we’ve actually had to the companies that are one or two that you tried and tried and tried and it doesn't work and you are like it’s fine, you just take your losses and then you walk away and I think sometimes we need to do that we need to sort of really adopt very consulting like approach, I'm going to go up to ten companies, five will respond the other five won't, it's okay so most of these times when I worked with companies they have actually also given us funding so at the at the university of Maryland we have a way to, there’s a standard NDA non disclosure agreement that we can use for funding and it works quite well so we've gotten anything from ten thousand dollars to twenty thousand dollars to work with the companies on data and it’s been useful, three hundred thousand dollars from the end of that I mean that's a pretty large volume but this is more targeted to you get twenty thousand dollars from the company and you can use all of that money, there are bo overheads I eventually end up using that money to pay for students or summer or the things that are directly related to that project and that's useful but the thing to note is that you have to be willing to put in the time and you also have to be willing to know when it's not working and walk away.  

What do you look for while accepting PhD students or postdocs? What kind of funding do they get and for how many years?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
I don't have any postdocs because I don't have much experience with postdocs. With Ph.D. students, there are a couple things that I specifically look for so at Maryland every time we have students we end up interviewing all of our students before we admit them, with this you can actually talk to the person on Skype or sometimes when they visit campus so you can gauge their personality and stuff like that in person. Well, a couple of things I look for, one is a general sense of curiosity, I think you need to be curious you need to be able to come in and say that there’s a child in a candy store, there has to be that sense of, oh so many things you can do, to my mind it's better to have many things that you want to do and not have enough time than to come in and say I know exactly what I want to do and I have my plan now and I'm really not interested in exploring. I would say the first is the level of curiosity like so that's the interest that's important. The second that we generally tend to sort of look for is a reasonably good technical background in their undergraduate program so if you have an engineering or a scienceundergraduate program. I tend to look at what are your grades for your math courses because we spend quite a bit of time with our students putting them through so our students are required to take courses in economics, the issue-level courses in economics so because we send our students to economics I mean they actually are the econ department now has decided to hold an entrance test of sort or a qualifying test for students coming in. You have to know the basic, you have to know some calculus, after this you have to you know some stats. To my mind if you have a reasonable background that just makes you go to the closest so those are the two things that I absolutely look what one is this essence that you're curious or your interested in your looking around, in your thinking and then usually you can tell by the way the person is interacting with you. The second thing that I think is important is to make sure that you have at least some technical jobs before you come in the door otherwise you're spending the first year trying to make up and that's all hard and it pushes you back by the way.  

How do you evaluate progress of PhD students or postdocs, and decide if they need to leave your program? What mistakes do you see them making in their initial years in the program?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
There’s a couple of things that I tell them upfront, well, a couple of things that I think are important, one I tell them that the issue program is an apprenticeship program so there is no recipe for how to be an academic, there's no guidebook for how to write a paper. I don't think any of us read a book and then decided that we are now researchers, you basically learn on the job so if it's an apprenticeship program it is very important that you find somebody to apprentice yourself to so you have to work with somebody and that is important because over two-three years, you'll learn from that person and you don't learn by reading, you learn by doing work with other people. The first mistake that I think a lot of our students make is they have the same mentality when they come in that they have in the masters and bachelors program which is they are thinking of professors being these cost perfectly substitutable pieces okay I took the SAT scores now I need to take a marketing course and just switch people out which means that your reading what is a mentorship relationship or what is an apprenticeship relationship you're treating it like a contractual relationship and I think that becomes a problem because then that's not how a doctor program functions that's not how it's made to work. The first thing I tell them is to find one or two people that you’re going to work with and don't try to be a lone ranger all by yourself, doing your work independently because you think you're really smart. You have to work with somebody that you are able to talk to, you're able to get a mental connect with. Where your work style matches and use that over two or three periods to learn the tools of the trade you learn how to be able to research or by working with the good researcher, you don’t learn by switching and faculty member are not Chinese buffet you're not gonna take a little bit of rice and a little bit of chicken because it doesn’t work like that. I think there are students who have that all I think a little bit here and there and it doesn’t work. Find a mentor who find a faculty member stick to that person and learn in the long run through apprenticeship. The second is our students sometimes tend to take on too many projects so everything looks interesting I want to do everything and they sometimes underestimate how long it takes to actually get up through completion. I'm not even talking about the review process, I’m talking about from getting a good idea actually having a thirty-five page draft that is reasonable and can be circulated, that itself takes a long time so then the student end up starting six projects and then the third or fourth year they're going oh Ihave six projects in my hand I don't know which one to do, they’re all incomplete and that can be an issue that is a huge problem often when they are in the fourth year we have to walk them through this process of coming up today okay prioritize, these two are important, push these two to the point of completion and these 4 we'd work later but at that point, they're working with five other professors so it gets a little awkward. Another thing that I thought was a problem but it slipped my mind, it'll come back. At the macro level there is this is how would biologists call EO Wilson, he's an interesting guy he's written a bunch of these books and I watch the talk about him like he was giving a seminar at Harvard once for a bunch of Phd students and graduate students he had this interesting idea he said look when I was doing my dissertation topic, I decided that if everybody was going left I'm going to go right, if everybody was going north I was going to go south and the way I saw it was yes there's greater risk in not going where everybody else is going but there's also potentially great appeal so one thing I tell students in terms of choosing their dissertation topics is it's tempting to do what everybody else is doing and it's tempting to do what is currently the fan so right now it is tempting to do crowdfunding it's tempting to do whatever is the social networks or whatever that the call back but it's also realizing that you do what everybody else is doing then you have to work that much harder and being able to differentiate yourself from what the other has and there is no guarantee that three or four years when you're on the market this is going to remainfashionable.  

What advice would you give to PhD students, particularly who are searching for dissertation topic, and who are looking to enter the job market?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
I tell the students to go in the different direction, even if it is risky, you're better off going in a different direction, opening up a new stream of work, taking chances that other people cannot take because you have the freedom that a Ph.D. program affords, they give you a type of flexibility that you don’t have later on in life. Whatever you want as long as you're able to convince the people that it’s reasonable so that the time to take risks. I tell them, look, don't go where everybody else is going, two, it is important to do what you really like and what you find in enjoyable, when I was at CMU, I took a seminar and I was a student and his advice was actually very clear, he said to look about the dissertation topic pick something that you really love because by the time you're done with it you will hate it because you've gone through so many emotions, so many different versions of the paper that you will absolutely hate it. If you pick something that you're not particularly passionate to start with then you aredead in the water right there. His thing was pick what you really find interesting then we can find ways to construct your dissertation around. I've had students who come to us and say okay what is interesting right now what can I work on, what do you think is interesting. In my mind that this is a silly question what is it you find interesting, what is it that you want to work on. My dissertation is done I'm done and the third thing that I think is you people ask me how do you do well in the market I think in general the market responds to enthusiasm and energy. Even if I don't understand what you're doing, I'm at a job talk and you are clearly so much in love with your own topic and you’re so enthusiastic about it, you’re so energetic and you have so much positive energy towards that topic most likely you're going to draw me in. We respond to people positively when they are so much in love with what they do and that only comes if you're doing what you really like doing, what you really want to doand so I think I tell my students that in my mind the secret to be good in the market is not methodology it's not domain this year all the jobs are going to healthcare. It's not like structural models are the in thing, not really, I mean there are people who do structural models get jobs. You have to find a topic that is near to you, that speaks to you, you have to be able to hit it with all your interests, your passion and that has to show up in a job talk. You have to be interested in your topic if you're not interested then nobody else will be. If you can you put that together then that is needed, most times rather than have a sort of a laundry list of what is interesting and then speaking, it doesn’t work.  

What courses do you teach? How has your teaching philosophy changed over the years?

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
I teach the core I.S. MBA class, we have an IT class in the MBA core so I teach the IT core class in the MBA program. I also teach one of the required courses in our master's program so, in the N.S. and I.S. program, I teach the required courses. The third course I teach in every alternate year is the big data elective to the master'sstudents. I go back and forth, those are the three courses that I teach. In terms of how my teaching has evolved, interesting, so now I firmly believe that less is more, when I was a junior faculty, I used to try and put in a lot of material in my courses. I used to feel that my job is to give you as much as I can give you and those two hours or three hours or whatever so I would end up giving them a lot of work, I think, increasingly now, I sort of step back and feel that less is more. You don’t need to give as much, it's better to give less and have more discussion and have more time to process that usually makes more of a difference. The students absorb more by having a little bit less that's one. Second is I tend to stress more on theory think I've been teaching at Maryland for my fourteenth year so I think you've been in this line for fourteen years you see the technologies change but the concepts remained the same. What used to be the technology of interest in 2002 is no longer the technology interest now but the underlying theories and concepts are still old. Increasingly now I tend to focus on the framework and the theory rather than just saying now look at technology per se. When I was younger, the technology was cool now I'm willing to step back from the technology and look at the concepts.     

What are some of the memorable things that students said or wrote to you? Feel free to share stories behind these notes.

Based on experience at: Professor, University of Maryland
Summarized By: arushi chaudhary on Tue May 12 2020
I think students I work with, each one tends to have a personality which is interesting. The approach that I have a student is as I mentioned, I don't expect students to do what I do so I don't have a student who's working on contracts because I want on contracts. The interesting part about the students I work with, each one tends to go off on a different direction which is consistent with my philosophy, to find what you're interested in and go in that direction so he doesn't bother don't have to buy the dissertation so far and each dissertation is different which means that at every point the students are essentially dragging me down the spot that I don't know so it's not something that I'm necessarily familiar with but I'm essentially being dragged by the students which means I act as the first level of the filter if you can’t convince me then you're not going to convince anybody else. This also means there are these open drawn-out arguments in my office where the students trying to convince me that I'm wrong and I'm trying to convince that they’re wrong and that can be quite interesting. I think apparently, here in Maryland I have a reputation for, students feel that I yell at them, that's not how I remember it but I think students feel like I’m pushing back and I feel they are pushing back and I think that is healthy and necessary, sort of back and forth. That seems to, for the most part, characterize my relationship with students I work with there is no argument that it sort of back and forth and I encourage that and I'm okay with people telling me that I'm wrong and I don't know what I'm talking about and that’s alright. Other than that, there is the standard, you know, I yell at them and they yelled back at me. I feel that any good relationship is built on a healthy level of conflict.